Chris Leslie Portrait

Chris Leslie

The Independent Group for Change - Former Member for Nottingham East

First elected: 6th May 2010

Left House: 6th November 2019 (Defeated)


International Trade Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 8th May 2019
International Trade Committee
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer
8th May 2015 - 14th Sep 2015
Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury
7th Oct 2013 - 8th May 2015
Shadow Minister (Treasury)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2013
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Constitutional Affairs)
13th Jun 2003 - 5th May 2005
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Office of the Deputy Prime Minister)
29th May 2002 - 13th Jun 2003
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
11th Jun 2001 - 29th May 2002
Public Accounts Committee
25th Jul 1997 - 5th Nov 1998


Division Voting information

Chris Leslie has voted in 1585 divisions, and 11 times against the majority of their Party.

29 Oct 2019 - Early Parliamentary General Election Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 The Independent Group for Change Aye votes vs 3 The Independent Group for Change No votes
Tally: Ayes - 295 Noes - 315
30 Jan 2019 - Crime (Overseas Production Orders) Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Labour Aye votes vs 206 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 310 Noes - 257
12 Sep 2018 - EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (FTA) And Investment Protection Agreement (IPA) - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 21 Labour Aye votes vs 143 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 331 Noes - 145
10 Sep 2018 - EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (FTA) AND INVESTMENT PROTECTION AGREEMENT (IPA) - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Labour Aye votes vs 3 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 8 Noes - 3
7 Dec 2016 - The Government's Plan for Brexit - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 23 Labour No votes vs 150 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 461 Noes - 89
20 Apr 2016 - Record Copies of Acts - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 23 Labour Aye votes vs 23 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 117 Noes - 38
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 56 Labour No votes vs 139 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 390
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 65 Labour Aye votes vs 153 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 397 Noes - 223
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Labour No votes vs 48 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 101 Noes - 166
18 Oct 2010 - Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Labour No votes vs 180 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 196 Noes - 346
15 Jun 2010 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Labour Aye votes vs 57 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 171 Noes - 263
View All Chris Leslie Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
David Gauke (Independent)
(99 debate interactions)
Greg Clark (Conservative)
(79 debate interactions)
Mark Hoban (Conservative)
(73 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(1498 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(100 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(93 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018
(34,204 words contributed)
Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Act 2018
(8,618 words contributed)
Trade Bill 2017-19
(942 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Chris Leslie's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Chris Leslie

14th March 2018
Chris Leslie signed this EDM on Thursday 15th March 2018

RUSSIA'S POISONING OF SERGEI AND YULIA SKRIPAL

Tabled by: Lord Walney (Crossbench - Barrow and Furness)
That this House unequivocally accepts the Russian state's culpability for the poisoning of Yulia and Sergei Skripal in Salisbury using the illegal novichok nerve agent which has also led to the serious illness of Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey who went to their rescue, and to the possible poisoning of other …
52 signatures
(Most recent: 23 Apr 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 25
Liberal Democrat: 12
Independent: 6
Scottish National Party: 5
The Independent Group for Change: 4
Crossbench: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
Conservative: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
24th October 2016
Chris Leslie signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 24th October 2016

REGENERATING NOTTINGHAM CASTLE AND THE NOTTINGHAMSHIRE VISITOR ECONOMY

Tabled by: Lilian Greenwood (Labour - Nottingham South)
This House notes that tourism is a key economic driver for Nottinghamshire, creating £1.6 billion in income and generating over 21,000 jobs; further notes that tourism, and the wider visitor economy, has a significant impact on the county's economy with further potential to deliver growth in the Midlands Engine region; …
9 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Oct 2016)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 5
Independent: 2
The Independent Group for Change: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Chris Leslie's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Chris Leslie, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


4 Urgent Questions tabled by Chris Leslie

Monday 7th October 2019
Thursday 24th January 2019
Wednesday 4th December 2013
Thursday 22nd March 2012

3 Adjournment Debates led by Chris Leslie

Thursday 15th September 2016
Wednesday 9th May 2012

1 Bill introduced by Chris Leslie


A Bill to prohibit universities awarding Master’s degrees unless certain standards of study and assessment are met; and for connected purposes

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 21st October 2011

1 Bill co-sponsored by Chris Leslie

Assaults on Retail Workers (Offences) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Alex Norris (LAB)


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
7 Other Department Questions
9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what progress his Department has made on the merger of further education colleges in Nottingham; and what options are under consideration for broadening and improving the governance of that new institution.

Following a city-wide review of further education provision in Nottingham by the Further Education Commissioner, the Boards of Governors of New College Nottingham and Central College Nottingham have agreed to pursue a merger of their colleges to take effect from September 2016.

Colleges are independent corporations and responsible for their own decision making, including the governance arrangements that will apply to the merged entity.

17th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what plans he has to review the adequacy of regulations protecting employees who report concerns about child exploitation; and if he will make a statement.

This Government is committed to ensuring there is a strong legislative framework to encourage workers to speak up about wrongdoing, risk or malpractice without fear of reprisal. The whistleblowing legislation ensures there is a legal remedy for those that do suffer a detriment in their employment as a result of whistleblowing. We recognise there is further to go and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills is currently implementing further legislative and non-legislative changes to improve the understanding and application of the law.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many businesses received support through the UK Guarantees Exports Refinancing Facility in 2013-14.

Following the Chancellor's announcement in the 2014 Budget UK Export Finance formally launched the Export Refinancing Facility (ERF) on 30 April 2014.

ERF is aimed at supporting UK bids for projects that require finance above $150m. As these projects typically involve lengthy contract negotiations, it may be sometime before we see a pipeline of deals that benefit from the ERF.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

Under this Government's transparency programme, details of spend are published on GOV.UK which are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications?departments%5B%5D=department-for-business-innovation-skills

To provide the level of detail requested in relation to agency fees would incur disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The Table below details the companies used and the total amounts paid to them in the last financial year. We are unable to identify separately the amounts retained by the companies as fees and the amounts passed on to the temporary worker by the company.

Agency

2013-14

£k

Adecco UK Ltd

1,162

Michael Page International Recruitment Ltd

533

Methods Consulting Ltd

517

Parity Resources Ltd

461

Allen Lane Ltd

406

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The Table below details the Department of Energy and Climate Change's consultancy expenditure in 2013-14:

2013-14

£k

KPMG LLP

2,340

Lazard & Co Ltd

1,940

Deloitte LLP

855

Baringa Partners LLP

238

Mott Macdonald Group Ltd

91

Redpoint Energy Ltd

91

Poyry Management Consulting (UK) Ltd

61

Oxera Consulting Ltd

60

Cambridge Economic Policy Associates

55

E S P Consulting

48

To ask the Attorney General, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for the Law Officers' Departments in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The following table lists the top five companies used by the Treasury Solicitor's Department (TSol), to provide temporary workers in 2013-14, by expenditure. TSol financial systems do not distinguish between the costs of temporary workers and the associated agency fee. TSol data also covers any expenditure incurred by HM Crown Prosecution service inspectorate and the Attorney General's Office.

Firm

Amount spent (net of VAT)

Capita Resourcing Ltd (Staff)

£5,404,407

Kelly Services (UK) Ltd

£1,711,926

Experis (Elan Computing Ltd)

£634,916

Hudson

£347,834

Methods Consulting Ltd

£168,256

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has spent the following amounts with four companies during 2013/14 in relation to the provision of temporary workers. The expenditure includes the cost of temporary staff. It is not possible to separately identify the agency element of the payments.

Firm

Amount spent (including VAT)

Brook Street (UK) Limited

£99,423

Reed Employment Plc

£52,718

Badenoch and Clark

£31,739

Hays Accountancy Personnel

£19,832

This information has been produced from the CPS accounting system.

The following table lists the top five companies used by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) to provide temporary workers in 2013-14, by expenditure. SFO financial systems do not distinguish between the costs of temporary workers and any associated agency fee.

Firm

Amount spent (including VAT)

Adecco

942,075

Alvarez and Marsal

609,499

Crowe Clarke Whitehill

590,264

Mazars LLP

567,627

FTI Consultancy

207,354

To ask the Attorney General, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by the Law Officers' Departments in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

In 2013-14 Professor Shute was paid £2,286.30 and Dr Tapley was paid £1,735.70 for consultancy services to HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI). There has been no other consultancy spend within that financial year by HMCPSI, the Treasury Solicitor's Department or the Attorney General's Office.

The two companies listed below are the only organisations to have been paid by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) for consultancy work during the last financial year.

SCC £32,316

CIO Partnership Ltd £2,100

Inaddition, two individuals carried out consultancy work for the SFO. The total amount paid for this work was £13,812

The table below details payments made by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) to consultancy firms during the last financial year.

Evolve Business Consultancy

£74,319

Saville Consulting UK Ltd Surrey

£22,008

Triad Group Plc Surrey

£19,260

Deloitte LLP Milton Keynes

£9,661

Hay Group Management Limited

£7,200

LA International Computer Consultants Ltd

£6,398

ASE Consulting Ltd Lancashire

£4,995

Enquin Enviromental Ltd Cardiff

£4,110

HR Lounge Ltd London Total

£3,180

Long and Partners Commissioning Consultancy Ltd

£2,010

This information has been produced from the CPS accounting system, analysing spend against account codes for consultancy and professional services. Expenditure may include some payments for services not covered by the Crown Commercial Service Consultancy Value Programme definition of consultancy but provided by companies categorised as a consultancy firm. Excluded are payments for professional services supplied by third parties not classified as a consultancy firm such as employment agencies, training providers, solicitors, ICT managed service suppliers and freelance consultants engaged directly by the department.

12th Oct 2017
To ask the Prime Minister, whether it is her understanding that the Article 50 notice signifying the intention of the UK to leave the EU is revocable.

I refer the hon. member to the answers I gave, on 9 October, to him, the right hon. member for Wolverhampton South East (Mr McFadden), Official Report, column 52, the hon. member for Bishop Auckland (Mrs Goodman), Official Report, column 60, the hon. member for Hampstead and Kilburn (Mrs Siddiq), Official Report, column 62 and the right hon. member for Exeter (Mr Bradshaw), Official Report, column 50.

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The Prime Minister's Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

Before the last General Election, including for the entire period while the Hon. Member was a minister in this very department, there were no effective cross-Governmental controls on consultancy spend. Nor were spending controls exercised on other areas such as procurement, advertising and marketing, and IT spend.

That's all changed and ministers - supported by Cabinet Office officials - now closely scrutinise what we spend on consultants and temporary labour. Departments saved over £1billion in 2012-13 (the last year for which we have audited figures) compared to the spending levels in the final year of the last administration, 2009-10. This helped us save taxpayers £10 billion in 2012-13 against a 2009-10 baseline.

We will continue to spend money on consultants and temporary labour when there is an appropriate business need to do so. Indeed in some cases engaging temporary labour is more flexible and cheaper for the taxpayer than taking on new staff. But we are also ensuring that the Civil Service has the skills needed. Our Capabilities Plan is designed to address long-standing gaps in four particular areas: digital skills, project management skills, commercial skills, and the leadership and management of change.

We publish all spend data over £25,000 and contracts over £10,000 on Gov.uk and Contracts Finder.

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for No. 10 Downing Street in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The Prime Minister's Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

Before the last General Election, including for the entire period while the Hon. Member was a minister in this very department, there were no effective cross-Governmental controls on consultancy spend. Nor were spending controls exercised on other areas such as procurement, advertising and marketing, and IT spend.

That's all changed and ministers - supported by Cabinet Office officials - now closely scrutinise what we spend on consultants and temporary labour. Departments saved over £1billion in 2012-13 (the last year for which we have audited figures) compared to the spending levels in the final year of the last administration, 2009-10. This helped us save taxpayers £10 billion in 2012-13 against a 2009-10 baseline.

We will continue to spend money on consultants and temporary labour when there is an appropriate business need to do so. Indeed in some cases engaging temporary labour is more flexible and cheaper for the taxpayer than taking on new staff. But we are also ensuring that the Civil Service has the skills needed. Our Capabilities Plan is designed to address long-standing gaps in four particular areas: digital skills, project management skills, commercial skills, and the leadership and management of change.

We publish all spend data over £25,000 and contracts over £10,000 on Gov.uk and Contracts Finder.

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The Prime Minister's Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

Before the last General Election, including for the entire period while the Hon. Member was a minister in this very department, there were no effective cross-Governmental controls on consultancy spend. Nor were spending controls exercised on other areas such as procurement, advertising and marketing, and IT spend.

That's all changed and ministers - supported by Cabinet Office officials - now closely scrutinise what we spend on consultants and temporary labour. Departments saved over £1billion in 2012-13 (the last year for which we have audited figures) compared to the spending levels in the final year of the last administration, 2009-10. This helped us save taxpayers £10 billion in 2012-13 against a 2009-10 baseline.

We will continue to spend money on consultants and temporary labour when there is an appropriate business need to do so. Indeed in some cases engaging temporary labour is more flexible and cheaper for the taxpayer than taking on new staff. But we are also ensuring that the Civil Service has the skills needed. Our Capabilities Plan is designed to address long-standing gaps in four particular areas: digital skills, project management skills, commercial skills, and the leadership and management of change.

We publish all spend data over £25,000 and contracts over £10,000 on Gov.uk and Contracts Finder.

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by No. 10 Downing Street in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The Prime Minister's Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

Before the last General Election, including for the entire period while the Hon. Member was a minister in this very department, there were no effective cross-Governmental controls on consultancy spend. Nor were spending controls exercised on other areas such as procurement, advertising and marketing, and IT spend.

That's all changed and ministers - supported by Cabinet Office officials - now closely scrutinise what we spend on consultants and temporary labour. Departments saved over £1billion in 2012-13 (the last year for which we have audited figures) compared to the spending levels in the final year of the last administration, 2009-10. This helped us save taxpayers £10 billion in 2012-13 against a 2009-10 baseline.

We will continue to spend money on consultants and temporary labour when there is an appropriate business need to do so. Indeed in some cases engaging temporary labour is more flexible and cheaper for the taxpayer than taking on new staff. But we are also ensuring that the Civil Service has the skills needed. Our Capabilities Plan is designed to address long-standing gaps in four particular areas: digital skills, project management skills, commercial skills, and the leadership and management of change.

We publish all spend data over £25,000 and contracts over £10,000 on Gov.uk and Contracts Finder.

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people were employed in Number 10 Downing Street in 2012; and how many people are so employed currently.

The Prime Minister’s Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

As part of this Government’s transparency agenda, information on working in the Cabinet Office is published on gov.uk

The latest organogram for the Cabinet Office may be viewed at http://data.gov.uk/organogram/cabinet-office

10th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment he has made of the effect of the changes to the Disabled Students' Allowance on the number of university applications in the forthcoming academic year.

The reform of Disabled Students’ Allowances is intended to ensure higher education institutions are consistently meeting their duties to disabled students under the Equality Act, and is not expected to impact on application rates.

The Government carried out an Equality Analysis as part of the recent consultation on reforms to Disabled Students’ Allowances. This is available online at https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/481527/bis-15-658-disabled-students-allowances-equality-analysis.pdf

10th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, whether he plans to conduct an equality impact assessment on the effect of changes to the Disabled Students' Allowance.

An Equality Analysis was undertaken as part of the consultation exercise on reforms to Disabled Students’ Allowances. This was published on 2 December 2015.

22nd Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many people were (a) in receipt of the Disabled Students' Allowance (DSA) in 2015-16 and (b) affected by proposed changes to the DSA by constituent region of the UK.

Student support for Higher Education in the UK is a devolved issue.

Statistics showing the number of English applicants awarded Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) are published annually by the Student Loans Company (SLC) in the Statistical First Release ‘Student Support for Higher Education in England’.

http://www.slc.co.uk/official-statistics/financial-support-awarded/england-higher-education.aspx

We are only partway through the academic year 2015/16 and so published figures only provide an early indication of DSA support for the whole academic year.

The changes being introduced in 2016/17 will apply to all students applying for DSAs for the first time from the 2016/17 academic year, and are intended to ensure that Higher Education Institutions are meeting their responsibilities to disabled students under the Equalities Act.

28th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, for what reasons his Department's Annual Report and Accounts for 2013-14 has not yet been published; and when that report is due to be published.

DCMS’s Annual Report and Accounts for 2013-14 was published on Wednesday 29th October.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by her Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The 10 professional services firms that were paid the most in 2013/14 are listed in the table below:

Supplier Name

Total paid in 2013-14 (£)

KPMG LLP

1,934,209.35

Pinsent Masons

950,789.80

Local Partnerships

429,919.24

Grant Thornton UK LLP

401,867.88

Regeneris Consulting Ltd

75,187.00

Andrew Dumbreck Media Limited

62,165.60

National Centre for Social Research

70,732.00

Deloitte (LLP No 2 a/c)

49,480.00

CLAS Co-operative Ltd

29,820.00

SQW Limited

29,413.00

These are unaudited figures from the Department's financials systems, net of recoverable VAT. The department uses professional services firms for a variety of purposes. In addition to consultancy services, they include expenditure on external legal support and advice on programmes, research fieldwork, evaluation, specialist technical advice and the provision of interim managers. Legal services from the Treasury Solicitors and providers of recruitment services have been excluded in order to arrive at a list of firms that are predominantly providers of consultancy.

3rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what records his Department holds on the number of child contact services contracts entered into by local authorities in England and Wales on an annual basis; and if he will make a statement.

Regarding the number of child contact services contracts entered into by local authorities in England and Wales, this information is not held centrally.

10th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what investigations (a) her Department and (b) the Further Education Commissioner has undertaken into the educational impact and value for money of the Gazelle Colleges Group, and if she will make a statement.

The Gazelle College Group is an independent organisation, not funded by Government. Decisions taken by Colleges to join or fund independent sector bodies are for their Corporations as charitable trustees, who should ensure they receive value for money for any expenditure incurred.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how existing schools embedded in hospitals for pupils with medical needs will be supported financially if planned changes to the commissioning of alternative provision proceed; and if she will make a statement.

We will announce more detail on the funding for alternative provision under the new commissioning arrangements in due course. We are mindful of the diverse range of provision which comes under the banner of alternative provision, and the particular logistical and geographical issues related to hospital schools.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will undertake an assessment of the costs and benefits to the community in Nottingham of re-establishing a motor project on the Wheelbase site in Sneinton.

Assessing the costs and benefits to the community is a local issue. Funding for alternative provision is delegated to local authorities within their high needs budgets so that they can determine the provision needed for children and young people in their area.

Local authorities also have duties to secure sufficient suitable education and training provision for all 16-19 year olds, and to support them to participate. Where gaps in provision are identified, the Education Funding Agency will either fill those places through negotiation with existing providers or run a competitive tender.

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 128 of her Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC 745, what the reasons are for the £466.7 million expenditure listed under other expenditure.

Academies provide the Department with an annual return which reports their expenditure in various categories, such as staff salaries, utilities or catering. Some expenditure is incurred that is difficult to categorise, and is therefore collated as ‘other expenditure’. Examples include some insurance costs, and PFI charges.

For the 2013-14 Department for Education Group Annual Report and Accounts, this ‘other expenditure’ was £466.7 million.

We are working to improve our sector reporting to reduce this figure and improve transparency. It should be noted that this year we reduced our reliance on the ‘other expenditure’ classification from £783.2m in 12-13 to £466.7m in 13-14, despite the significant increase in the number of academies.

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 128 of her Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC 745, what the reasons are for the increase in auditors' remuneration compared to the previous financial year.

Auditors’ and educational consultancy remunerations have increased in 2013-14 to reflect the increasing number of academies consolidated into the Department for Education’s accounts. In 2013-14, 2,585 Academy Trusts were consolidated into the Department’s accounts (2012-13: 2,108 Academy Trusts).

Audit fees are costs incurred by Academy Trusts in fulfilling their statutory duty of ensuring that their financial statements are audited whilst non-audit fees may include fees for preparing statutory accounts and management accounts, internal audit and systems check and payroll preparation.

20th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 128 of her Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC 745, what the reasons are for the increase in the cost of other office services since the previous financial year.

The Department for Education reported £1,179 million for ‘other office expenditure’ in its 2013-14 accounts, an increase of £672.6 million compared to 2012-13. The expenditure disclosed relates exclusively to the Department’s academy trusts and is sourced from the academy trusts’ own accounts.

The increase arises for two reasons, the first being the growth in academy numbers since 2012-13 (an increase of 1082 academies since March 2013 to 3905 in March 2014).

Secondly, academy trust costs are reported slightly differently in the Department’s 2012-13 and 2013-14 accounts. This is not unusual; we have only consolidated accounts for two years and we are working at improving the transparency of expenditure. For example, some costs reported under the caption ‘other expenditure’ in 2012-13 have now been included under the heading ‘other office expenditure’ in 2013-14.

20th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the reasons were for the cash losses, fruitless payments and write-offs worth more than £100,000 referred to on page 156 of her Department's Annual Report and Accounts, 2013-14, HC 745.

There are three instances of individual losses over £100,000:

  • St. Aldhelm’s Academy, £1.21 million: as disclosed in the Department’s accounts, the academy trust suffered a loss as a result of a misdirection of a payment into the wrong bank account. The loss has not been recovered and a police investigation is in hand.

  • Oasis Community School Walthamstow, £138,000: the free school project was stopped before opening, but had already incurred unrecoverable costs.

  • Chorley Career and Sixth Form Academy, £129,554: another free school project, was also stopped before opening, but had already incurred unrecoverable costs.

9th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when her Department's Annual Report and Accounts for 2013-14 will be published; and what the reasons are for the time taken to publish that report.

The Department for Education’s 2013-14 Annual Report and Accounts is due to be laid in Parliament on 19 January 2015 and published on 20 January 2015. The accounts cover three executive agencies (Education Funding Agency, Standards Testing Agency and National College of Teaching Leadership), and two executive non-departmental public bodies (Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service and the Office of the Children’s Commissioner). In addition they also consolidate the accounts of 2,585 Academy Trusts, operating 3,905 schools. As the accounts will explain in more detail, this consolidation is a significant piece of work, involving a number of technical accounting challenges, and it is not possible to complete it in time to enable publication within the usual Parliamentary pre-summer recess timeframe.

5th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she plans to publish the findings of her Department's review into asbestos management in school buildings; and if she will make a statement.

The Department for Education is working with stakeholders, experts and the Health and Safety Executive to thoroughly consider the latest evidence, and determine appropriate policy responses. We will provide an update on the management of asbestos in schools shortly.

28th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons her Department's Annual Report and Accounts for 2013-14 has not yet been published; and when that report is due to be published.

The 2013-14 Departmental Consolidated Accounts are the second set of accounts to include academy trusts information. The sheer size and complexity of the consolidation means that the accounts could not be laid within the usual Parliamentary pre-summer recess timeframe.

The Department for Education has advised the Public Accounts Committee it aims to lay the annual report and accounts in December 2014, a month earlier than was possible last year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

Under this Government's transparency programme, details of spend for the Department for Education are published on gov.uk which are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications?departments%5B%5D=department-for-education

To provide the level of detail requested in relation to agency fees would incur disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

Under this Government's transparency programme, details of spend is published on gov.uk which is available at: http://data.gov.uk/data/openspending-report/index

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average annual revenue budget was for an (a) primary school academy and (b) secondary school academy in England and Wales in financial year 2012-13.

Annual revenue budgets for primary and secondary academies for the academic year September 2012 to August 2013 are available on the gov.uk website:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/academy-pre-16-allocation-data-2012-to-2013-academic-year

Education in Wales is a devolved matter for the Welsh Government.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools had academy status in England and Wales at the latest date for which figures are available.

The information requested can be found at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/open-academies-and-academy-projects-in-development.

Education in Wales is a devolved matter and is the responsibility of the Welsh Government.

26th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has allocated funding for the planning and construction of laboratories to inspect meat and plant products at the Dover entrance to the Channel Tunnel in the event that the UK leaves the customs union.

The animal and plant health conditions applicable to trade between the UK and the EU after the UK leaves the EU will be subject to negotiation. The outcome of these negotiations will influence what form of official controls will be required for trade with the EU in future, including at the UK border. Like all Government departments, Defra is working on preparations for a range of scenarios to deliver a smooth departure from the EU.

6th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the 10 largest domestic subsidies used by UK industry by virtue of UK membership of EU trading arrangements under the World Trade Organisation definition of aggregate measurement of support are by (a) type of good, (b) sector, (c) quantity of goods affected and (d) estimated value to the UK economy.

The most recent notification for the EU domestic support in agriculture is for the marketing year 2012/13.

The total aggregate measure of support notified was €5.9bn. This is overwhelmingly market price support which is only calculated for the EU as a whole and not for individual member states. The products with the largest notified support are:

Product

Aggregate Measure of Support

Butter

€2,743m

Common wheat

€1,865m

Skimmed milk powder

€1,145m

Wine

€696m

Milk

€192m

Ethyl alcohol

€82m

Sugar

€59m

Bee keeping

€43m

Olive oil

€18m

Fibre flax and hemp

€7m

6th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the 10 existing EU tariff rate quotas with the largest economic value for the UK economy are by (a) type of good, (b) sector of the economy, (c) quantity and (d) estimated value for UK industry.

The EU currently notifies over 120 tariff rate quotas in agriculture and a further 19 non-agriculture tariff rate quotas. There can be several tariff rate quotas within a single sector such as beef or sugar, for different products and different countries which export to the EU and UK. We do not currently assess tariff rate quotas by economic value: they are defined and administered according to the volume rather than the value of imports. All tariff rate quotas which other countries use to export to the UK, however, will be important to them, and important to the industry affected.

6th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of whether the UK should negotiate a UK-specific entitlement to the aggregate measurement of support that the EU is allowed under World Trade Organisation rules; and if she will make a statement.

In leaving the EU, we will need to update the terms of our WTO membership where, at present, our commitments are currently contained in the EU’s schedule. We recognise the need to work with the EU and with other WTO Members in order to ensure a smooth transition which minimises the disruption to our trading relationships with other WTO Members, including developing country Members and our closest trading partners.

As the Secretary of State for International Trade said in his Written Ministerial Statement on 5th December “the Government will prepare the necessary draft schedules which replicate as far as possible our current obligations”. We do not intend to alter the scope of concessions currently enjoyed by WTO members. While this is largely a technical process, there are a number of areas where we will need to consult with other WTO members.

6th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of whether the UK should agree a division of EU tariff rate quotas before consideration by Parliament of UK-specific World Trade Organisation schedules of concessions; and if she will make a statement.

In leaving the EU, we will need to update the terms of our WTO membership where, at present, our commitments are currently contained in the EU’s schedule. We recognise the need to work with the EU and with other WTO Members in order to ensure a smooth transition which minimises the disruption to our trading relationships with other WTO Members, including developing country Members and our closest trading partners.

As the Secretary of State for International Trade said in his Written Ministerial Statement on 5th December “the Government will prepare the necessary draft schedules which replicate as far as possible our current obligations”. We do not intend to alter the scope of concessions currently enjoyed by WTO members. While this is largely a technical process, there are a number of areas where we will need to consult with other WTO members.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

This table sets out the information requested in respect of 2012-13, the last financial year for which audited information is available. Information relating to 2013-14 will be available in July 2014, once the Department's accounts for the year have been audited and published. The figures relate to the Core Department.

Consultancy firm

Amount paid

in 2012-13 (£)

Ernst and Young

1,012,378

Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer

587,922

Local Partnerships

152,226

KPMG

118,351

Bureau Veritas UK Ltd.

105,185

Baker Tilly

101,925

ADAS UK Ltd.

99,138

GHK Consulting Ltd.

71,424

Resource Decisions Ltd.

64,800

Temple Group Ltd.

44,380

31st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how many trade-related agreements, that are not full Free Trade Agreements, would require rolling-over to ensure that the UK continues to trade with non-EU countries on substantially the same terms after (a) 29 March 2019 and (b) any implementation period.

The Government is seeking to deliver continuity of existing international agreements as we leave the EU.

The EU has agreed to notify third countries that, during the implementation period, the UK is treated as an EU member state for the purposes of international agreements. This includes all EU international agreements, including free trade, and trade-related agreements. This provides a basis for continuity across all such agreements during this period.

In parallel, we’ve been engaging with third countries to identify which agreements are relevant, important and need action. Where this is the case, we are working with them to put in place successor agreements that replicate the effects of existing agreements as far as possible and which will come into force following the implementation period or on exit in the event of a ‘no deal’ scenario. The Secretary of State recently deposited information in the House Library on those international agreements which have already been signed and those which we expect to sign shortly. A number of these agreements include trade-related elements; for example the Trade in Wine Agreement with Australia, and Mutual Recognition Agreements with Australia and New Zealand. There are other agreements where the UK is seeking to ensure readiness by the end of March 2019. The precise number will depend on ongoing discussions with third countries, and we will provide a further update on these other agreements after technical discussions have concluded.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
25th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether his Department plans to update its website entitled Information about the Withdrawal Bill to reflect the decision of the House to pass amendment 7 to clause 9 of the EU (Withdrawal) Bill.

The Government has provided a range of explanatory material to accompany the EU (Withdrawal) Bill in its passage through Parliament. We will update this material periodically to reflect any changes to the Bill as necessary.

12th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, in what format and by what date he plans to publish his Department's plan for the UK's negotiations on exiting the EU; and if he will make a statement.

We will set out our broad plans before triggering Article 50 by the end of next March, repeating the proviso as agreed by the House on 12 October 2016, without division, confirmed on the 7th December, that nothing we do or say should undermine the UK's negotiating position.

12th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the UK remaining a member of the European Economic Area.

We want to see UK companies having the maximum freedom to trade with and operate in the Single Market, and for EU companies to be able to do the same here.

We are currently looking at all the options. To support this work, officials across Government are carrying out a programme of sectoral and regulatory analysis, which will identify the key factors for UK businesses and the labour force that will affect our negotiations with the EU. They are looking in detail at over 50 sectors as well as cross-cutting regulatory issues.

As the UK is party to the EEA agreement only in its capacity as an EU member state, once we leave the European Union the EEA agreement will automatically cease to apply to the UK.The model we are seeking is one unique to the United Kingdom and not an off the shelf solution.

12th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether it is his policy to negotiate a transitional agreement with the EU so that existing trading arrangements for UK companies will be able to continue beyond 1 April 2019; and if he will make a statement.

The Prime Minister has said we want a smooth and orderly exit from the EU, and to provide certainty where we can. How the government achieves that will depend on the nature of the negotiations and the agreement reached with the EU, but it would not be in the interests of either side– Britain or the EU – to see disruption. The government is considering all possible options, focusing on the mutual interests of the UK and the EU.