Chris Leslie Portrait

Chris Leslie

The Independent Group for Change - Former Member for Nottingham East

International Trade Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 8th May 2019
International Trade Committee
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer
8th May 2015 - 14th Sep 2015
Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury
7th Oct 2013 - 8th May 2015
Shadow Minister (Treasury)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2013
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Constitutional Affairs)
13th Jun 2003 - 5th May 2005
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Office of the Deputy Prime Minister)
29th May 2002 - 13th Jun 2003
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
11th Jun 2001 - 29th May 2002
Public Accounts Committee
25th Jul 1997 - 5th Nov 1998


Division Voting information

Chris Leslie has voted in 1585 divisions, and 11 times against the majority of their Party.

29 Oct 2019 - Early Parliamentary General Election Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 The Independent Group for Change Aye votes vs 3 The Independent Group for Change No votes
Tally: Ayes - 295 Noes - 315
30 Jan 2019 - Crime (Overseas Production Orders) Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Labour Aye votes vs 206 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 310 Noes - 257
12 Sep 2018 - EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (FTA) And Investment Protection Agreement (IPA) - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 21 Labour Aye votes vs 143 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 331 Noes - 145
10 Sep 2018 - EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (FTA) AND INVESTMENT PROTECTION AGREEMENT (IPA) - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Labour Aye votes vs 3 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 8 Noes - 3
7 Dec 2016 - The Government's Plan for Brexit - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 23 Labour No votes vs 150 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 461 Noes - 89
20 Apr 2016 - Record Copies of Acts - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 23 Labour Aye votes vs 23 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 117 Noes - 38
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 56 Labour No votes vs 139 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 390
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 65 Labour Aye votes vs 153 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 397 Noes - 223
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Labour No votes vs 48 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 101 Noes - 166
18 Oct 2010 - Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Labour No votes vs 180 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 196 Noes - 346
15 Jun 2010 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Chris Leslie voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Labour Aye votes vs 57 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 171 Noes - 263
View All Chris Leslie Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
David Gauke (Independent)
(99 debate interactions)
Greg Clark (Conservative)
(79 debate interactions)
Mark Hoban (Conservative)
(73 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(1498 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(100 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(93 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Chris Leslie's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Chris Leslie

14th March 2018
Chris Leslie signed this EDM on Thursday 15th March 2018

RUSSIA'S POISONING OF SERGEI AND YULIA SKRIPAL

Tabled by: Lord Walney (Crossbench - Barrow and Furness)
That this House unequivocally accepts the Russian state's culpability for the poisoning of Yulia and Sergei Skripal in Salisbury using the illegal novichok nerve agent which has also led to the serious illness of Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey who went to their rescue, and to the possible poisoning of other …
52 signatures
(Most recent: 23 Apr 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 25
Liberal Democrat: 12
Independent: 6
Scottish National Party: 5
The Independent Group for Change: 4
Crossbench: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
Conservative: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
24th October 2016
Chris Leslie signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 24th October 2016

REGENERATING NOTTINGHAM CASTLE AND THE NOTTINGHAMSHIRE VISITOR ECONOMY

Tabled by: Lilian Greenwood (Labour - Nottingham South)
This House notes that tourism is a key economic driver for Nottinghamshire, creating £1.6 billion in income and generating over 21,000 jobs; further notes that tourism, and the wider visitor economy, has a significant impact on the county's economy with further potential to deliver growth in the Midlands Engine region; …
9 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Oct 2016)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 5
Independent: 2
The Independent Group for Change: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Chris Leslie's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Chris Leslie, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


4 Urgent Questions tabled by Chris Leslie

Monday 7th October 2019
Thursday 24th January 2019
Wednesday 4th December 2013
Thursday 22nd March 2012

3 Adjournment Debates led by Chris Leslie

Thursday 1st November 2018
Thursday 15th September 2016
Wednesday 9th May 2012

Chris Leslie has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Chris Leslie has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


196 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
11 Other Department Questions
12th Oct 2017
To ask the Prime Minister, whether it is her understanding that the Article 50 notice signifying the intention of the UK to leave the EU is revocable.

I refer the hon. member to the answers I gave, on 9 October, to him, the right hon. member for Wolverhampton South East (Mr McFadden), Official Report, column 52, the hon. member for Bishop Auckland (Mrs Goodman), Official Report, column 60, the hon. member for Hampstead and Kilburn (Mrs Siddiq), Official Report, column 62 and the right hon. member for Exeter (Mr Bradshaw), Official Report, column 50.

10th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment he has made of the effect of the changes to the Disabled Students' Allowance on the number of university applications in the forthcoming academic year.

The reform of Disabled Students’ Allowances is intended to ensure higher education institutions are consistently meeting their duties to disabled students under the Equality Act, and is not expected to impact on application rates.

The Government carried out an Equality Analysis as part of the recent consultation on reforms to Disabled Students’ Allowances. This is available online at https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/481527/bis-15-658-disabled-students-allowances-equality-analysis.pdf

10th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, whether he plans to conduct an equality impact assessment on the effect of changes to the Disabled Students' Allowance.

An Equality Analysis was undertaken as part of the consultation exercise on reforms to Disabled Students’ Allowances. This was published on 2 December 2015.

22nd Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many people were (a) in receipt of the Disabled Students' Allowance (DSA) in 2015-16 and (b) affected by proposed changes to the DSA by constituent region of the UK.

Student support for Higher Education in the UK is a devolved issue.

Statistics showing the number of English applicants awarded Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) are published annually by the Student Loans Company (SLC) in the Statistical First Release ‘Student Support for Higher Education in England’.

http://www.slc.co.uk/official-statistics/financial-support-awarded/england-higher-education.aspx

We are only partway through the academic year 2015/16 and so published figures only provide an early indication of DSA support for the whole academic year.

The changes being introduced in 2016/17 will apply to all students applying for DSAs for the first time from the 2016/17 academic year, and are intended to ensure that Higher Education Institutions are meeting their responsibilities to disabled students under the Equalities Act.

9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what progress his Department has made on the merger of further education colleges in Nottingham; and what options are under consideration for broadening and improving the governance of that new institution.

Following a city-wide review of further education provision in Nottingham by the Further Education Commissioner, the Boards of Governors of New College Nottingham and Central College Nottingham have agreed to pursue a merger of their colleges to take effect from September 2016.

Colleges are independent corporations and responsible for their own decision making, including the governance arrangements that will apply to the merged entity.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many businesses received support through the UK Guarantees Exports Refinancing Facility in 2013-14.

Following the Chancellor's announcement in the 2014 Budget UK Export Finance formally launched the Export Refinancing Facility (ERF) on 30 April 2014.

ERF is aimed at supporting UK bids for projects that require finance above $150m. As these projects typically involve lengthy contract negotiations, it may be sometime before we see a pipeline of deals that benefit from the ERF.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

Under this Government's transparency programme, details of spend are published on GOV.UK which are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications?departments%5B%5D=department-for-business-innovation-skills

To provide the level of detail requested in relation to agency fees would incur disproportionate cost.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The Table below details the companies used and the total amounts paid to them in the last financial year. We are unable to identify separately the amounts retained by the companies as fees and the amounts passed on to the temporary worker by the company.

Agency

2013-14

£k

Adecco UK Ltd

1,162

Michael Page International Recruitment Ltd

533

Methods Consulting Ltd

517

Parity Resources Ltd

461

Allen Lane Ltd

406

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

Under this Government's transparency programme, details of spend are published on GOV.UK which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications?departments%5B%5D=department-for-business-innovation-skills.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The Table below details the Department of Energy and Climate Change's consultancy expenditure in 2013-14:

2013-14

£k

KPMG LLP

2,340

Lazard & Co Ltd

1,940

Deloitte LLP

855

Baringa Partners LLP

238

Mott Macdonald Group Ltd

91

Redpoint Energy Ltd

91

Poyry Management Consulting (UK) Ltd

61

Oxera Consulting Ltd

60

Cambridge Economic Policy Associates

55

E S P Consulting

48

To ask the Attorney General, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for the Law Officers' Departments in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The following table lists the top five companies used by the Treasury Solicitor's Department (TSol), to provide temporary workers in 2013-14, by expenditure. TSol financial systems do not distinguish between the costs of temporary workers and the associated agency fee. TSol data also covers any expenditure incurred by HM Crown Prosecution service inspectorate and the Attorney General's Office.

Firm

Amount spent (net of VAT)

Capita Resourcing Ltd (Staff)

£5,404,407

Kelly Services (UK) Ltd

£1,711,926

Experis (Elan Computing Ltd)

£634,916

Hudson

£347,834

Methods Consulting Ltd

£168,256

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has spent the following amounts with four companies during 2013/14 in relation to the provision of temporary workers. The expenditure includes the cost of temporary staff. It is not possible to separately identify the agency element of the payments.

Firm

Amount spent (including VAT)

Brook Street (UK) Limited

£99,423

Reed Employment Plc

£52,718

Badenoch and Clark

£31,739

Hays Accountancy Personnel

£19,832

This information has been produced from the CPS accounting system.

The following table lists the top five companies used by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) to provide temporary workers in 2013-14, by expenditure. SFO financial systems do not distinguish between the costs of temporary workers and any associated agency fee.

Firm

Amount spent (including VAT)

Adecco

942,075

Alvarez and Marsal

609,499

Crowe Clarke Whitehill

590,264

Mazars LLP

567,627

FTI Consultancy

207,354

To ask the Attorney General, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by the Law Officers' Departments in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

In 2013-14 Professor Shute was paid £2,286.30 and Dr Tapley was paid £1,735.70 for consultancy services to HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI). There has been no other consultancy spend within that financial year by HMCPSI, the Treasury Solicitor's Department or the Attorney General's Office.

The two companies listed below are the only organisations to have been paid by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) for consultancy work during the last financial year.

SCC £32,316

CIO Partnership Ltd £2,100

Inaddition, two individuals carried out consultancy work for the SFO. The total amount paid for this work was £13,812

The table below details payments made by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) to consultancy firms during the last financial year.

Evolve Business Consultancy

£74,319

Saville Consulting UK Ltd Surrey

£22,008

Triad Group Plc Surrey

£19,260

Deloitte LLP Milton Keynes

£9,661

Hay Group Management Limited

£7,200

LA International Computer Consultants Ltd

£6,398

ASE Consulting Ltd Lancashire

£4,995

Enquin Enviromental Ltd Cardiff

£4,110

HR Lounge Ltd London Total

£3,180

Long and Partners Commissioning Consultancy Ltd

£2,010

This information has been produced from the CPS accounting system, analysing spend against account codes for consultancy and professional services. Expenditure may include some payments for services not covered by the Crown Commercial Service Consultancy Value Programme definition of consultancy but provided by companies categorised as a consultancy firm. Excluded are payments for professional services supplied by third parties not classified as a consultancy firm such as employment agencies, training providers, solicitors, ICT managed service suppliers and freelance consultants engaged directly by the department.

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the total amount of remuneration paid to non-executive directors of Government departments was for the financial year (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2012-13.

Since the last General Election the Cabinet Office has overhauled, strengthened and formalised the system of non-executive directors which operated under the previous administration.

Remuneration for non-executive board members is detailed in ‘Corporate governance in central government departments: Code of good practice July 2011- Guidance Note’ and is in line that of the Bank of England’s non-executive Directors of Court.

In 2012-2013, 28% of the 67 non-executives either waived their fee or donated it to charity.

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people were employed in Number 10 Downing Street in 2012; and how many people are so employed currently.

The Prime Minister’s Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

As part of this Government’s transparency agenda, information on working in the Cabinet Office is published on gov.uk

The latest organogram for the Cabinet Office may be viewed at http://data.gov.uk/organogram/cabinet-office

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The Prime Minister's Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

Before the last General Election, including for the entire period while the Hon. Member was a minister in this very department, there were no effective cross-Governmental controls on consultancy spend. Nor were spending controls exercised on other areas such as procurement, advertising and marketing, and IT spend.

That's all changed and ministers - supported by Cabinet Office officials - now closely scrutinise what we spend on consultants and temporary labour. Departments saved over £1billion in 2012-13 (the last year for which we have audited figures) compared to the spending levels in the final year of the last administration, 2009-10. This helped us save taxpayers £10 billion in 2012-13 against a 2009-10 baseline.

We will continue to spend money on consultants and temporary labour when there is an appropriate business need to do so. Indeed in some cases engaging temporary labour is more flexible and cheaper for the taxpayer than taking on new staff. But we are also ensuring that the Civil Service has the skills needed. Our Capabilities Plan is designed to address long-standing gaps in four particular areas: digital skills, project management skills, commercial skills, and the leadership and management of change.

We publish all spend data over £25,000 and contracts over £10,000 on Gov.uk and Contracts Finder.

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for No. 10 Downing Street in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The Prime Minister's Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

Before the last General Election, including for the entire period while the Hon. Member was a minister in this very department, there were no effective cross-Governmental controls on consultancy spend. Nor were spending controls exercised on other areas such as procurement, advertising and marketing, and IT spend.

That's all changed and ministers - supported by Cabinet Office officials - now closely scrutinise what we spend on consultants and temporary labour. Departments saved over £1billion in 2012-13 (the last year for which we have audited figures) compared to the spending levels in the final year of the last administration, 2009-10. This helped us save taxpayers £10 billion in 2012-13 against a 2009-10 baseline.

We will continue to spend money on consultants and temporary labour when there is an appropriate business need to do so. Indeed in some cases engaging temporary labour is more flexible and cheaper for the taxpayer than taking on new staff. But we are also ensuring that the Civil Service has the skills needed. Our Capabilities Plan is designed to address long-standing gaps in four particular areas: digital skills, project management skills, commercial skills, and the leadership and management of change.

We publish all spend data over £25,000 and contracts over £10,000 on Gov.uk and Contracts Finder.

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The Prime Minister's Office is an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

Before the last General Election, including for the entire period while the Hon. Member was a minister in this very department, there were no effective cross-Governmental controls on consultancy spend. Nor were spending controls exercised on other areas such as procurement, advertising and marketing, and IT spend.

That's all changed and ministers - supported by Cabinet Office officials - now closely scrutinise what we spend on consultants and temporary labour. Departments saved over £1billion in 2012-13 (the last year for which we have audited figures) compared to the spending levels in the final year of the last administration, 2009-10. This helped us save taxpayers £10 billion in 2012-13 against a 2009-10 baseline.

We will continue to spend money on consultants and temporary labour when there is an appropriate business need to do so. Indeed in some cases engaging temporary labour is more flexible and cheaper for the taxpayer than taking on new staff. But we are also ensuring that the Civil Service has the skills needed. Our Capabilities Plan is designed to address long-standing gaps in four particular areas: digital skills, project management skills, commercial skills, and the leadership and management of change.

We publish all spend data over £25,000 and contracts over £10,000 on Gov.uk and Contracts Finder.

28th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, for what reasons his Department's Annual Report and Accounts for 2013-14 has not yet been published; and when that report is due to be published.

DCMS’s Annual Report and Accounts for 2013-14 was published on Wednesday 29th October.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by her Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The 10 professional services firms that were paid the most in 2013/14 are listed in the table below:

Supplier Name

Total paid in 2013-14 (£)

KPMG LLP

1,934,209.35

Pinsent Masons

950,789.80

Local Partnerships

429,919.24

Grant Thornton UK LLP

401,867.88

Regeneris Consulting Ltd

75,187.00

Andrew Dumbreck Media Limited

62,165.60

National Centre for Social Research

70,732.00

Deloitte (LLP No 2 a/c)

49,480.00

CLAS Co-operative Ltd

29,820.00

SQW Limited

29,413.00

These are unaudited figures from the Department's financials systems, net of recoverable VAT. The department uses professional services firms for a variety of purposes. In addition to consultancy services, they include expenditure on external legal support and advice on programmes, research fieldwork, evaluation, specialist technical advice and the provision of interim managers. Legal services from the Treasury Solicitors and providers of recruitment services have been excluded in order to arrive at a list of firms that are predominantly providers of consultancy.

3rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what records his Department holds on the number of child contact services contracts entered into by local authorities in England and Wales on an annual basis; and if he will make a statement.

Regarding the number of child contact services contracts entered into by local authorities in England and Wales, this information is not held centrally.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
10th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what investigations (a) her Department and (b) the Further Education Commissioner has undertaken into the educational impact and value for money of the Gazelle Colleges Group, and if she will make a statement.

The Gazelle College Group is an independent organisation, not funded by Government. Decisions taken by Colleges to join or fund independent sector bodies are for their Corporations as charitable trustees, who should ensure they receive value for money for any expenditure incurred.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how existing schools embedded in hospitals for pupils with medical needs will be supported financially if planned changes to the commissioning of alternative provision proceed; and if she will make a statement.

We will announce more detail on the funding for alternative provision under the new commissioning arrangements in due course. We are mindful of the diverse range of provision which comes under the banner of alternative provision, and the particular logistical and geographical issues related to hospital schools.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will undertake an assessment of the costs and benefits to the community in Nottingham of re-establishing a motor project on the Wheelbase site in Sneinton.

Assessing the costs and benefits to the community is a local issue. Funding for alternative provision is delegated to local authorities within their high needs budgets so that they can determine the provision needed for children and young people in their area.

Local authorities also have duties to secure sufficient suitable education and training provision for all 16-19 year olds, and to support them to participate. Where gaps in provision are identified, the Education Funding Agency will either fill those places through negotiation with existing providers or run a competitive tender.

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 128 of her Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC 745, what the reasons are for the increace in consultancy costs compared to the previous financial year.

Auditors’ and educational consultancy remunerations have increased in 2013-14 to reflect the increasing number of academies consolidated into the Department for Education’s accounts. In 2013-14, 2,585 Academy Trusts were consolidated into the Department’s accounts (2012-13: 2,108 Academy Trusts).

Audit fees are costs incurred by Academy Trusts in fulfilling their statutory duty of ensuring that their financial statements are audited whilst non-audit fees may include fees for preparing statutory accounts and management accounts, internal audit and systems check and payroll preparation.

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 128 of her Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC 745, what the reasons are for the £466.7 million expenditure listed under other expenditure.

Academies provide the Department with an annual return which reports their expenditure in various categories, such as staff salaries, utilities or catering. Some expenditure is incurred that is difficult to categorise, and is therefore collated as ‘other expenditure’. Examples include some insurance costs, and PFI charges.

For the 2013-14 Department for Education Group Annual Report and Accounts, this ‘other expenditure’ was £466.7 million.

We are working to improve our sector reporting to reduce this figure and improve transparency. It should be noted that this year we reduced our reliance on the ‘other expenditure’ classification from £783.2m in 12-13 to £466.7m in 13-14, despite the significant increase in the number of academies.

20th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 128 of her Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC 745, what the reasons are for the increase in the cost of other office services since the previous financial year.

The Department for Education reported £1,179 million for ‘other office expenditure’ in its 2013-14 accounts, an increase of £672.6 million compared to 2012-13. The expenditure disclosed relates exclusively to the Department’s academy trusts and is sourced from the academy trusts’ own accounts.

The increase arises for two reasons, the first being the growth in academy numbers since 2012-13 (an increase of 1082 academies since March 2013 to 3905 in March 2014).

Secondly, academy trust costs are reported slightly differently in the Department’s 2012-13 and 2013-14 accounts. This is not unusual; we have only consolidated accounts for two years and we are working at improving the transparency of expenditure. For example, some costs reported under the caption ‘other expenditure’ in 2012-13 have now been included under the heading ‘other office expenditure’ in 2013-14.

20th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the reasons were for the cash losses, fruitless payments and write-offs worth more than £100,000 referred to on page 156 of her Department's Annual Report and Accounts, 2013-14, HC 745.

There are three instances of individual losses over £100,000:

  • St. Aldhelm’s Academy, £1.21 million: as disclosed in the Department’s accounts, the academy trust suffered a loss as a result of a misdirection of a payment into the wrong bank account. The loss has not been recovered and a police investigation is in hand.

  • Oasis Community School Walthamstow, £138,000: the free school project was stopped before opening, but had already incurred unrecoverable costs.

  • Chorley Career and Sixth Form Academy, £129,554: another free school project, was also stopped before opening, but had already incurred unrecoverable costs.

9th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when her Department's Annual Report and Accounts for 2013-14 will be published; and what the reasons are for the time taken to publish that report.

The Department for Education’s 2013-14 Annual Report and Accounts is due to be laid in Parliament on 19 January 2015 and published on 20 January 2015. The accounts cover three executive agencies (Education Funding Agency, Standards Testing Agency and National College of Teaching Leadership), and two executive non-departmental public bodies (Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service and the Office of the Children’s Commissioner). In addition they also consolidate the accounts of 2,585 Academy Trusts, operating 3,905 schools. As the accounts will explain in more detail, this consolidation is a significant piece of work, involving a number of technical accounting challenges, and it is not possible to complete it in time to enable publication within the usual Parliamentary pre-summer recess timeframe.

5th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she plans to publish the findings of her Department's review into asbestos management in school buildings; and if she will make a statement.

The Department for Education is working with stakeholders, experts and the Health and Safety Executive to thoroughly consider the latest evidence, and determine appropriate policy responses. We will provide an update on the management of asbestos in schools shortly.

28th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons her Department's Annual Report and Accounts for 2013-14 has not yet been published; and when that report is due to be published.

The 2013-14 Departmental Consolidated Accounts are the second set of accounts to include academy trusts information. The sheer size and complexity of the consolidation means that the accounts could not be laid within the usual Parliamentary pre-summer recess timeframe.

The Department for Education has advised the Public Accounts Committee it aims to lay the annual report and accounts in December 2014, a month earlier than was possible last year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

Under this Government's transparency programme, details of spend for the Department for Education are published on gov.uk which are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications?departments%5B%5D=department-for-education

To provide the level of detail requested in relation to agency fees would incur disproportionate cost.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average annual revenue budget was for an (a) primary school academy and (b) secondary school academy in England and Wales in financial year 2012-13.

Annual revenue budgets for primary and secondary academies for the academic year September 2012 to August 2013 are available on the gov.uk website:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/academy-pre-16-allocation-data-2012-to-2013-academic-year

Education in Wales is a devolved matter for the Welsh Government.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools had academy status in England and Wales at the latest date for which figures are available.

The information requested can be found at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/open-academies-and-academy-projects-in-development.

Education in Wales is a devolved matter and is the responsibility of the Welsh Government.

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

Under this Government's transparency programme, details of spend is published on gov.uk which is available at: http://data.gov.uk/data/openspending-report/index

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
26th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has allocated funding for the planning and construction of laboratories to inspect meat and plant products at the Dover entrance to the Channel Tunnel in the event that the UK leaves the customs union.

The animal and plant health conditions applicable to trade between the UK and the EU after the UK leaves the EU will be subject to negotiation. The outcome of these negotiations will influence what form of official controls will be required for trade with the EU in future, including at the UK border. Like all Government departments, Defra is working on preparations for a range of scenarios to deliver a smooth departure from the EU.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the 10 largest domestic subsidies used by UK industry by virtue of UK membership of EU trading arrangements under the World Trade Organisation definition of aggregate measurement of support are by (a) type of good, (b) sector, (c) quantity of goods affected and (d) estimated value to the UK economy.

The most recent notification for the EU domestic support in agriculture is for the marketing year 2012/13.

The total aggregate measure of support notified was €5.9bn. This is overwhelmingly market price support which is only calculated for the EU as a whole and not for individual member states. The products with the largest notified support are:

Product

Aggregate Measure of Support

Butter

€2,743m

Common wheat

€1,865m

Skimmed milk powder

€1,145m

Wine

€696m

Milk

€192m

Ethyl alcohol

€82m

Sugar

€59m

Bee keeping

€43m

Olive oil

€18m

Fibre flax and hemp

€7m

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the 10 existing EU tariff rate quotas with the largest economic value for the UK economy are by (a) type of good, (b) sector of the economy, (c) quantity and (d) estimated value for UK industry.

The EU currently notifies over 120 tariff rate quotas in agriculture and a further 19 non-agriculture tariff rate quotas. There can be several tariff rate quotas within a single sector such as beef or sugar, for different products and different countries which export to the EU and UK. We do not currently assess tariff rate quotas by economic value: they are defined and administered according to the volume rather than the value of imports. All tariff rate quotas which other countries use to export to the UK, however, will be important to them, and important to the industry affected.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of whether the UK should negotiate a UK-specific entitlement to the aggregate measurement of support that the EU is allowed under World Trade Organisation rules; and if she will make a statement.

In leaving the EU, we will need to update the terms of our WTO membership where, at present, our commitments are currently contained in the EU’s schedule. We recognise the need to work with the EU and with other WTO Members in order to ensure a smooth transition which minimises the disruption to our trading relationships with other WTO Members, including developing country Members and our closest trading partners.

As the Secretary of State for International Trade said in his Written Ministerial Statement on 5th December “the Government will prepare the necessary draft schedules which replicate as far as possible our current obligations”. We do not intend to alter the scope of concessions currently enjoyed by WTO members. While this is largely a technical process, there are a number of areas where we will need to consult with other WTO members.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of whether the UK should agree a division of EU tariff rate quotas before consideration by Parliament of UK-specific World Trade Organisation schedules of concessions; and if she will make a statement.

In leaving the EU, we will need to update the terms of our WTO membership where, at present, our commitments are currently contained in the EU’s schedule. We recognise the need to work with the EU and with other WTO Members in order to ensure a smooth transition which minimises the disruption to our trading relationships with other WTO Members, including developing country Members and our closest trading partners.

As the Secretary of State for International Trade said in his Written Ministerial Statement on 5th December “the Government will prepare the necessary draft schedules which replicate as far as possible our current obligations”. We do not intend to alter the scope of concessions currently enjoyed by WTO members. While this is largely a technical process, there are a number of areas where we will need to consult with other WTO members.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

This table sets out the information requested in respect of 2012-13, the last financial year for which audited information is available. Information relating to 2013-14 will be available in July 2014, once the Department's accounts for the year have been audited and published. The figures relate to the Core Department.

Consultancy firm

Amount paid

in 2012-13 (£)

Ernst and Young

1,012,378

Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer

587,922

Local Partnerships

152,226

KPMG

118,351

Bureau Veritas UK Ltd.

105,185

Baker Tilly

101,925

ADAS UK Ltd.

99,138

GHK Consulting Ltd.

71,424

Resource Decisions Ltd.

64,800

Temple Group Ltd.

44,380

31st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how many trade-related agreements, that are not full Free Trade Agreements, would require rolling-over to ensure that the UK continues to trade with non-EU countries on substantially the same terms after (a) 29 March 2019 and (b) any implementation period.

The Government is seeking to deliver continuity of existing international agreements as we leave the EU.

The EU has agreed to notify third countries that, during the implementation period, the UK is treated as an EU member state for the purposes of international agreements. This includes all EU international agreements, including free trade, and trade-related agreements. This provides a basis for continuity across all such agreements during this period.

In parallel, we’ve been engaging with third countries to identify which agreements are relevant, important and need action. Where this is the case, we are working with them to put in place successor agreements that replicate the effects of existing agreements as far as possible and which will come into force following the implementation period or on exit in the event of a ‘no deal’ scenario. The Secretary of State recently deposited information in the House Library on those international agreements which have already been signed and those which we expect to sign shortly. A number of these agreements include trade-related elements; for example the Trade in Wine Agreement with Australia, and Mutual Recognition Agreements with Australia and New Zealand. There are other agreements where the UK is seeking to ensure readiness by the end of March 2019. The precise number will depend on ongoing discussions with third countries, and we will provide a further update on these other agreements after technical discussions have concluded.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
25th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether his Department plans to update its website entitled Information about the Withdrawal Bill to reflect the decision of the House to pass amendment 7 to clause 9 of the EU (Withdrawal) Bill.

The Government has provided a range of explanatory material to accompany the EU (Withdrawal) Bill in its passage through Parliament. We will update this material periodically to reflect any changes to the Bill as necessary.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, in what format and by what date he plans to publish his Department's plan for the UK's negotiations on exiting the EU; and if he will make a statement.

We will set out our broad plans before triggering Article 50 by the end of next March, repeating the proviso as agreed by the House on 12 October 2016, without division, confirmed on the 7th December, that nothing we do or say should undermine the UK's negotiating position.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the UK remaining a member of the European Economic Area.

We want to see UK companies having the maximum freedom to trade with and operate in the Single Market, and for EU companies to be able to do the same here.

We are currently looking at all the options. To support this work, officials across Government are carrying out a programme of sectoral and regulatory analysis, which will identify the key factors for UK businesses and the labour force that will affect our negotiations with the EU. They are looking in detail at over 50 sectors as well as cross-cutting regulatory issues.

As the UK is party to the EEA agreement only in its capacity as an EU member state, once we leave the European Union the EEA agreement will automatically cease to apply to the UK.The model we are seeking is one unique to the United Kingdom and not an off the shelf solution.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
12th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether it is his policy to negotiate a transitional agreement with the EU so that existing trading arrangements for UK companies will be able to continue beyond 1 April 2019; and if he will make a statement.

The Prime Minister has said we want a smooth and orderly exit from the EU, and to provide certainty where we can. How the government achieves that will depend on the nature of the negotiations and the agreement reached with the EU, but it would not be in the interests of either side– Britain or the EU – to see disruption. The government is considering all possible options, focusing on the mutual interests of the UK and the EU.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
23rd Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, with reference to the 2013 meeting convened by the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute in co-operation with the Vienna International Justice Institute and the International Coloured Gemstone Association, what steps the Government is taking to promote the establishment of a mechanism for the traceability and certification of ethical origin of coloured gemstones; and if she will make a statement.

The Government is supporting international efforts to promote ethical sourcing of minerals. We contributed to the development of the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict Affected and High Risk Areas. We are a founding member of the European Partnership for Responsible Minerals, which works with industry and civil society to share best practice on mineral traceability and certification schemes. We are also working to improve the livelihoods of artisanal miners in Rwanda and Zimbabwe.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of offering assistance to conservation organisations in Madagascar for the protection of the environment from the effect of unregulated sapphire mining; and if she will make a statement.

The Government believes that environmental protection and regulation of extractive industries are vital for sustainable development. Madagascar receives assistance through a number of global programmes. These include the Global Environment Facility, which has numerous projects in Madagascar. In addition, we are contributing to improved governance of Madagascan mining through our support to the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative.


To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for her Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The list below details the five companies used most often to provide temporary workers for DFID in financial year 2013/4:

1. Hays Specialist Recruitment Ltd

2. Hudson Global Resources Ltd

3. Anderson Knight Ltd

4. Allegis Group Ltd

5. Michael Page International

It is not possible to disaggregate agency fees from the total payments made to these companies for the services of temporary staff.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by her Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The 10 consultancy firms paid the most by the Department for International Development in the last financial year, and how much each was paid; is detailed in the table below.

Company

Amount (£)

Computer Futures

79,334

Mark McGivern

27,188

Unit 4

14,806

Kilcher Consultancy Limited

14,642

Tam O'Neil

10,000

Naina Patel

7,194

Network of International Consultants in Health and Development

6,358

Social Development Direct Ltd

6,048

Aikan Uganda Limited

3,643

Zodiak Broadcasting Station

3,480

11th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which Departments are responsible for each of the EU free trade agreements that the UK is seeking to roll-over.

The task of ensuring continuity of EU free trade agreements is a cross-government programme with the Department of International Trade’s Trade Policy Group (TPG) working closely with other government departments, alongside the Department for International Development (DFID), the Department for Exiting the European Union (DExEU) and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO).

1st Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether he plans to replicate existing EU non-reciprocal preferential trade agreements with developing countries after the UK leaves the EU; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is currently reviewing its trade policy as the UK prepares to leave the EU.

The UK remains committed to ensuring developing countries can reduce poverty through trading opportunities. We recognise the need for a smooth transition which minimises disruption to our trading relationships, including with developing countries.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to his written ministerial statement of 5 December 2016, Official Report, HCWS316, on the UK's commitments at the World Trade Organisation, what process he plans to adopt to secure parliamentary approval of the necessary draft schedules he is preparing.

Parliament will be involved in helping shape the UK's future as we leave the European Union. We will keep Parliament informed of the development of the schedules.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment he has made of the potential costs and benefits for the UK of membership of the European Free Trade Association; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon Member for Nottingham East to the answer I gave to my hon Friend for Bristol North West on 31 October, UIN:50013.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will hold discussions with the Secretary of State for Justice on introducing tighter measures for companies that employ drivers so that such companies are automatically informed when an employee is convicted of a motoring offence and subsequently loses their professional driving licence; and if he will make a statement.

There are no plans for the Secretary of State to hold discussions with the Secretary of State for Justice about measures of this kind.

The Driver and Vehicle and Licencing Agency (DVLA) does not hold or ask for details of where drivers work. In the haulage sector, some drivers are self-employed or work through agencies on short-term contracts for a variety of different companies.

All employers have a duty to check their employees’ licences regularly; the DVLA advises that this should be done at least once every three months and they can do so using the DVLA’s free licence check service.

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 26 January 2015 to Question 222065, what amount was spent on each of the 10 largest items of media and publicity expenditure in 2013-14.

The amount spent on the 10 largest items of media and publicity expenditure in the financial year 2013-14 are provided in the table below:

Amount

£’000

Coastal Rescue Public Relations events

87

DfT Road Safety Marketing Campaign: Purchase of road safety materials

70

Internal Communications

37

Procurement advertising

32

Highways Agency: Statutory Advertising. Advertising in local papers advising the public

of future works, closures and route changes.

23

As above

22

As above

21

As above

20

As above

17

As above

17

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 29 January 2015 to Question 222103, how many vehicles were clamped by the DVLA wheel-clamping service in 2013-14.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)’s wheelclamping contractors clamped or impounded 45,602 vehicles between 1 April 2013 and 31 March 2014. Some local authorities and police forces have devolved powers to take enforcement action against unlicensed vehicles on behalf of the DVLA. Between 1 April 2013 and 31 March 2014, 9,289 vehicles were clamped or impounded by these local authorities and police forces. It is not possible to separate the number of vehicles that were clamped from the number of vehicles that were impounded.

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 2 February 2015 to Question 222099, what the amount spent was on each instance of reprographic expenditure totalling more than £10,000 in 2013-14.

The amount spent on separately identifiable instances of reprographic expenditure totalling more than £10,000 in 2013-14 are listed in the table below:

Reasons

Expenditure totalling more than £10,000

Items

£'000

DVLA reprographic costs – specialist printing undertaken.

7,521

Printing of the Environmental Statement and Environmental consultation costs

886

British Transport Police costs relating to reusable CDs & USB sticks being used for policing purposes. Such items are charged to this account code along with reprographics.

655

Certificates issued to sea-men as proof of necessary qualifications. These have to be specially printed to prevent forgery.

180

Franking machine to cover postage of mass updated copies of car fuel consumption guide, print copies and manuals and technical reports.

107

3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 22 January 2015 to Question 221264, in respect of which projects or programmes were the sums for Ove Arup & Partners Limited, Atkins Limited, Environmental Resources Management Limited and CH2M Hill UK incurred.

The projects or programmes sums for Ove Arup & Partners Limited, Atkins Limited, Environmental Resources Management Limited and CH2M Hill UK incurred are provided in the table below as follows:

Organisation

Project/Programme

Ove Arup & Partners Limited

Activity 1 and Activity 2

Atkins Limited

Activity 1 and Activity 2

Environmental Resources Management Limited (ERM)

Activity 2

CH2M Hill UK

Activity 3

These suppliers contribute to the design of the HS2 project overall. This is split into three 3 activities listed below:

· Activity 1 – Civil Engineering and Structural Design Services:

To develop the existing concept design and produce a design which meets HS2 Ltd’s strategic objectives and the overall design programme.

· Activity 2 – Environmental Services:

This activity includes scope and methodology for surveys and impact assessments, environmental design aims, environmental engagement with stakeholders, environmental survey, environmental impact assessment, health impact assessment, equality impact assessment, and a mitigation report.

· Activity 3 – Development Partner role:

Supporting HS2 Ltd moving from Hybrid Bill Delivery to support and assisting on the next stage.

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, to which organisations his Department paid subscriptions of more than £1,000 in 2013-14; and how much his Department paid to each such organisation.

The organisations that the Department paid subscriptions of more than £1,000 in 2013-14; and the amounts paid to each such organisation are provided in the table below:

Organisations to which the Department paid subscriptions of more than £1,000

Amount paid (£’000)

UK Contribution to Paris Agreement

40

Technical Standards Agency Subscription

31

Etsi Subscription

6

Equasis

54

IMO Annual Subscription

1,552

Environment and Ship Safety subs

103

ITSO (Integrated Transport Smartcard Organisation) Ltd

39

The Chartered Institution of Highways & Transportation (CIHT)

47

DHL Global

1

The European New Car Assessment Programme (Euro NCAP)

120

Telephone Technologies Inc (TTI Technologies LLC)

28

Imperial College London

19

ERTICO - ITS Europe

11

Intergovernmental Organisation for International Carriage by Rail (OTIF) Annual Subscription

240

Informa PLC

2

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 26 January 2015 to Question 221267, which banks charged his Department more than £1,000 in 2013-14; and what the reason was for each such bank charge.

The banks that charged more than £1,000 in 2013-14; and the reason for each such bank chargeare listed in the table below:

Which Bank charged the Department more than £1000

Reason

RBS

This is the payment made for the running of British Transport Police accounts including charges for BACS and CHAPS payments

International Banks around the Globe

VCA has a global presence and uses a number of commercial banks to conduct its Business. The bank charges cover normal commercial transaction costs and currency conversion charges.

Barclays

Barclays provides banking services ranging from quarterly commitments fees, credit facilities, overdraft facilities and interest charges on Swaps to a number of external Entities within the Group

Barclaycard Expenses

VCA has a global presence and uses a number of commercial banks to conduct its Business. The bank charges cover normal commercial transaction costs and currency conversion charges.

Bank of England

The Bank of England charges the Department for using the Government Banking Service. The costs incurred relate to the production of e.g. high volumes of payable orders through these bank accounts.

Royal Bank of Scotland

Bank charges for general transaction and account administration fees.

Lloyds

HS2 Ltd operates a Commercial Bank Account with Lloyds and incurred transaction charges for making and receiving payments in the ordinary course of business.

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 26 January 2015 to Question 221267, what the reasons were for each of the agent's fees of more than £100,000 in financial year 2013-14; and what the amount was that was paid to each agent.

The reason for each agent's fees more than £100,000 in financial year 2013-14 and the amount that was paid to each agent are provided in the table below as follows:

Reasons for each agent's fees of more than £100,000

Amount paid to each Agent (£’000)

The total agents fees paid as set out in this specific cost category relate to the DVLA Wheel-clamping service.

8,475

Railway Pensions Management Ltd - management costs of the railway pension schemes which were taken over by the DfT when British Railways closed down, and are a statutory obligation.

4,750

Costs relating to the Modernising Employment Contract Buyout and subsequent merger of VOSA and DSA to form the DVSA.

14,988

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 26 January 2015 to Question 221267, what the reasons were for each instance of reprographic expenditure totalling more than £10,000 in 2013-14.

The reasons for each instance of reprographic expenditure totalling more than £10,000 in 2013-14 are listed in the table below; however note that the account codes used for reprographic costs by some agencies include a range of expenditure types beyond strictly reprographic costs.

Reasons

Items

Costs relate to reusable CDs & USB sticks being used for policing purposes. Such items are charged to this account code along with reprographics.

Franking machine (1) to cover postage of mass updated copies of car fuel consumption guide (2) print 105,000 copies of car fuel consumption guide costing £16,275 and (3) manuals and technical reports.

DVLA's reprographic costs – specialist printing undertaken by the Agency

Certificates issued to sea-men by Maritime and Coastguard Agency as proof of necessary qualifications. These have to be specially printed to prevent forgery.

Printing of the Environmental Statement and HS2 Environmental consultation costs

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 26 January 2015 to Question 221267, what the reasons were for the 10 largest items of media and publicity expenditure in financial year 2013-14.

The reasons for the 10 largest items of media and publicity expenditure in the financial year 2013-14 are provided in the table below as follows:

Largest items

Reasons for largest items of media and publicity expenditure

DfT Road Safety Marketing Campaign

The expenditure relates to Think Road Safety Campaign.

Purchase road safety materials

For local Authorities Road Safety Officers and Teachers.

Advertising costs

(several items)

Highways Agency’s Statutory advertising - advising the public, transport users and business of future road closures, route changes and maintenance of the road Networks.

Internal Communications

External Agency for media and publicity activities.

Coastal Rescue Public Relation events

Payments for public relation events for coastal rescue services.

Recruitment & appointment

(several items)

Recruiting and appointing new staff.

Licence Fees

For Survey Access.

United states Advertising

Vehicle Certification Agency Business Development analysis through American Express.

Procurement advertising

Advertising procurement opportunities over 2013-14.

19th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to page 168 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, which were the 10 largest recipients of payments by the Departmental Group for Professional Services; and how much was paid to each such recipient.

The 10 largest recipients of payments for Professional Services were as follows:

£m

1

Ove Arup & Partners Limited

35

2

Atkins Limited

24

3

Environmental Resources Management Limited

22

4

CH2M Hill UK

21

5

Mott Macdonald Limited

14

6

Capita Symonds Ltd

12

7

Parsons Brinckerhoff Ltd

8

8

Aecom Ltd

3

9

Network Rail Infrastructure Ltd

2

10

Deloitte

2

19th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to page 168 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC 12, what items constitute the other costs category of programme costs in that document.

The major categories of cost are as follows:


Items

Amount £'000

Training

4,436

Other Staff related costs

19,622

Bank charges

712

Reprographics

3,398

Subscriptions

2,252

Insurance

11,589

Media and Publicity

1,939

Agents’ Fees

24,583

Accounting adjustments

(3,264)

Property related costs

8,214

Other operational costs incurred by:

Central department

14,481

Highways Agency

38,127

Maritime and Coastguard Agency

20,249

Vehicle Certification Agency

2,236

Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency

124,249

British Transport Police

5,074

Lighthouse Authorities

10,272

Other entities

869

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The table below sets out the ten professional services consultancy firms paid the most by the Department during the eleven months of the financial year 2013-14 for which we have data. These companies are sorted in descending level of departmental expenditure.

Company Name

Total spend for periods 1 to 11 of financial year 2013/14

EVERSHEDS LLP

13,829,112

FRESHFIELDS BRUCKHAUS DERINGER

3,245,153

SYSTEMS UP LTD

706,248

DTZ

414,077

ALLEN & OVERY

236,786

CUBIC TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS LTD

234,598

THOMPSONS SOLICITORS

234,260

NABARRO LLP

200,614

ROWSELL WRIGHT LTD

160,486

BOYES TURNER LLP

160,000

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The five companies used most often to provide temporary workers to Department for Transport were:

Badenoch and Clark

Capita

Networkers

Spring Technology

Michael Page

We are unable to provide the amount in fees paid to each Supplier as this information is not recorded. The cost of a temporary worker is provided as a total daily rate which is inclusive of Supplier fees.

14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans she has to fund the Citizens Advice help to claim scheme beyond April 2020; and if she will make a statement.

The Department takes seriously the need to support vulnerable claimants, and wants the application process for Universal Credit to be as quick and easy as possible, ensuring that claimants receive money at the earliest opportunity.

Citizens Advice and Citizens Advice Scotland have been delivering the ‘Help to Claim’ service on a pilot basis since April 2019, supporting claimants with making a new claim to Universal Credit. The Citizens Advice Help to Claim service offers tailored, practical support to help people make a Universal Credit claim up to receiving their first full correct payment on time, and is available online, on the phone and face-to-face through local Citizen’s Advice services.

We are committed to ensuring that delivery of services, such as Help to Claim, are carefully monitored and evaluated to provide effective support to our most vulnerable claimants, whilst ensuring value to taxpayers. We have begun evaluation of the service and will use this to inform decisions about the future of the service beyond March 2020.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the timetable is for the roll-out of universal credit in Nottingham; which categories of claimants will be included in each phase of that roll-out; and what deadline is planned for the completion of that roll-out.

Universal Credit was recently rolled out to jobcentres in Nottingham on Wednesday 17 October, and in December, Universal Credit will be live in every Jobcentre in the country.

The Managed Migration regulations will come before Parliament in the autumn, and during 2019 we will test and refine our processes on a small scale to ensure they are working well before we take on larger volumes from 2020 onwards, and complete the process in 2023.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
31st Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many employers are currently accredited under the Two Ticks scheme.

The previous Positive about Disability (Two Ticks) scheme has been replaced by the new Disability Confident scheme, which was formally launched on 2 November 2016 with attendant publicity aimed at both employers and disabled people. Prior to the change there were about 3,500 employers listed as “Two Ticks”. There are currently more than 2,400 employers signed up to Disability Confident, with that number growing daily.

The new scheme has been designed to give employers the tools they need to recruit, retain and develop disabled staff. Employers currently registered with the Two Ticks scheme are invited to transfer to Disability Confident. If they accept, they are sent the Disability Confident Employer self-assessment pack and allowed 12 months to undertake the self-assessment.

Some employers have chosen to undertake the self-assessment straight away. In submitting details to be awarded Disability Confident Employer, the employer is required to confirm that they have undertaken the self-assessment.

No validation of the self-assessment is required. However, to reach the highest level of Disability Confident Leader, a business must put that assessment up for external challenge, which could include examination by disabled groups, disabled staff networks or professional assessment bodies.

The new Disability Confident scheme went live in a test and learn phase from July 2016. Feedback was considered and changes made to the scheme before it was launched on 2nd November. The effectiveness of the scheme will now be closely monitored, looking at the number of employers signed up by sector and by geographic area, as well as such issues as what offers of employment, apprenticeships, internships, etc. they are making and delivering.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
31st Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that disabled people are made aware that the Two Ticks scheme is being transferred to the Disability Confident scheme.

The previous Positive about Disability (Two Ticks) scheme has been replaced by the new Disability Confident scheme, which was formally launched on 2 November 2016 with attendant publicity aimed at both employers and disabled people. Prior to the change there were about 3,500 employers listed as “Two Ticks”. There are currently more than 2,400 employers signed up to Disability Confident, with that number growing daily.

The new scheme has been designed to give employers the tools they need to recruit, retain and develop disabled staff. Employers currently registered with the Two Ticks scheme are invited to transfer to Disability Confident. If they accept, they are sent the Disability Confident Employer self-assessment pack and allowed 12 months to undertake the self-assessment.

Some employers have chosen to undertake the self-assessment straight away. In submitting details to be awarded Disability Confident Employer, the employer is required to confirm that they have undertaken the self-assessment.

No validation of the self-assessment is required. However, to reach the highest level of Disability Confident Leader, a business must put that assessment up for external challenge, which could include examination by disabled groups, disabled staff networks or professional assessment bodies.

The new Disability Confident scheme went live in a test and learn phase from July 2016. Feedback was considered and changes made to the scheme before it was launched on 2nd November. The effectiveness of the scheme will now be closely monitored, looking at the number of employers signed up by sector and by geographic area, as well as such issues as what offers of employment, apprenticeships, internships, etc. they are making and delivering.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
31st Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that employers transferred from the Two Ticks scheme to the Disability Confident scheme are meeting the requirements for which they are being accredited.

The previous Positive about Disability (Two Ticks) scheme has been replaced by the new Disability Confident scheme, which was formally launched on 2 November 2016 with attendant publicity aimed at both employers and disabled people. Prior to the change there were about 3,500 employers listed as “Two Ticks”. There are currently more than 2,400 employers signed up to Disability Confident, with that number growing daily.

The new scheme has been designed to give employers the tools they need to recruit, retain and develop disabled staff. Employers currently registered with the Two Ticks scheme are invited to transfer to Disability Confident. If they accept, they are sent the Disability Confident Employer self-assessment pack and allowed 12 months to undertake the self-assessment.

Some employers have chosen to undertake the self-assessment straight away. In submitting details to be awarded Disability Confident Employer, the employer is required to confirm that they have undertaken the self-assessment.

No validation of the self-assessment is required. However, to reach the highest level of Disability Confident Leader, a business must put that assessment up for external challenge, which could include examination by disabled groups, disabled staff networks or professional assessment bodies.

The new Disability Confident scheme went live in a test and learn phase from July 2016. Feedback was considered and changes made to the scheme before it was launched on 2nd November. The effectiveness of the scheme will now be closely monitored, looking at the number of employers signed up by sector and by geographic area, as well as such issues as what offers of employment, apprenticeships, internships, etc. they are making and delivering.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many (a) adults and (b) children with cystic fibrosis who have previously claimed disability living allowance have received no award when assessed under the new personal independence payment.

The Department intends to provide detailed breakdowns of DLA to PIP reassessment outcomes in due course. The Department is working to guidelines set by the UK Statistics Authority to ensure we are able to publish statistics that meet high quality standards at the earliest opportunity.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many recipients of disability living allowance between the ages of 16 and 64 qualifying for each rate of (a) care and (b) mobility component have a main disabling condition of cystic fibrosis.

The information requested is shown in the table below.

DLA care component with Cystic Fibrosis as an identified main disability condition, aged 16-64 - August 2015

All

3,770

Higher Rate

1,320

Lower Rate

720

Middle Rate

1,670

Nil Rate

70

DLA mobility component with Cystic Fibrosis aged 16-64 - August 2015

All

3,770

Higher Rate

1,780

Lower Rate

110

Nil Rate

1,880

Source: DWP 100% WPLS.

Notes:

1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 2. Totals show the number of people in receipt of an allowance, and excludes cases where the payment has been suspended e.g. if they are in hospital.

3. A diagnosed medical condition does not mean that someone is automatically entitled to DLA. Entitlement is dependent on an assessment of how much help someone needs with personal care and/or mobility because of their disability. These statistics are only collected for administrative purposes.

4. DLA care and mobility components can be paid together or on their own. The nil payment row is where the claimant is in receipt of the care component and not the mobility component 5. This information does not include PIP which replaced DLA for new claimants aged 16 to 64 from 8 April 2013.

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much his Department spent on tackling benefit fraud and error in each of the last five financial years.

Fraud and error is tackled within a number of areas across the Department. Specifically, the Fraud, Error and Debt Programme which commenced in June 2013 and delivers major change projects.

Spending on the Fraud, Error and Debt Programme for the 5 years between 2010/11 and 2014/15 was £300m, delivering savings of circa £2bn. Further savings in the region of £2.9bn are expected by the end of 2021- 2022.

In addition the Fraud and Error Service is a specialist organisation focused on identifying and correcting benefit fraud and the many Operational teams across the Department also play a critical role in preventing fraud and error occurring. The Department also provides financial incentives to Local Authorities with regard to identifying fresh initiatives to support the reduction of fraud and error in housing benefit.

To provide a breakdown of how much the Department spent in aggregate on tackling benefit fraud and error in the last five years would incur disproportionate costs and we have therefore not provided a breakdown.

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans his Department has to work with credit reference agencies on addressing benefit fraud and error.

We already use credit reference agency data in the Fraud and Error Service on a case by case basis to support investigations, for example once high suspicion has already been identified which could be via a Hotline allegation or staff referral for example. In debt recovery the use of credit reference agency data enables us to have more informed discussions with the debtor and to reach agreement on rates of repayment that are sustainable for the debtor and meet our needs.

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when he plans to transfer housing benefit fraud investigation powers from local authorities to national investigation service.

The current intention is for Local Authority powers to prosecute Housing Benefit cases to be turned off from 02 April 2016, at which time the Department for Work and Pensions Fraud and Error Service will assume overall responsibility, following the full implementation of the Single Fraud Investigation Service Project.

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the cost to the public purse was of benefit fraud in (a) 2014-15 and (b) 2013-14; and what proportion of total expenditure on housing benefit that cost represented in each of those years.

Overpayments in the benefit system have fallen to a record low of 1.8% for 2014-15.


In 2013-14 total benefit expenditure excluding housing benefit was £140bn, of which the cost of benefit fraud was £0.77bn (0.55%). Similarly, Housing Benefit expenditure was £24.2bn, of which the cost of benefit fraud was £0.43bn (1.78%).


In 2014-15 total benefit expenditure excluding housing benefit was £144bn, of which the cost of benefit fraud was £0.71bn (0.49%). Similarly, Housing Benefit expenditure was £24.3bn, of which the cost of benefit fraud was 0.59bn (2.43%).


9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the reasons for increased benefit fraud in the last financial year.

The 2014-2015 national statistics for fraud and error were published on 5 November 2015. We are committed to tackling fraud and error, and these figures show a reduction in total benefit fraud and error to the lowest ever level of 1.8%. There was a slight increase of 0.1% in the benefit fraud figure (from 0.7% in 2013-2014 to 0.8%).

4th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, which credit reference agencies his Department has engaged in housing benefit claim verification in the last financial year; and for what purpose each such agency was engaged.

The Department has not engaged any credit reference agencies in Housing Benefit claims in the last financial year. Individual local authorities are free to make their own local arrangements for the administration of Housing Benefit and some may use credit reference agencies to verify claims. We do not collect information on this.

9th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have made at least one claim for out of work benefits in each region and constituent part of the UK since May 2010.

The information requested is not available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The top 10 consultancy firms by spend in 2013/2014 were:

PriceWaterhouse Coopers £2,964,276

KPMG £2,573,186

WS Atkins PLC £2,155,486

Capgemini PLC £1,520,975

Ernst & Young £1,195,116

Deloitte MCS Ltd £836,116

Methods Consulting Ltd £35,400

Compass Management Consulting Ltd £31,250

British Telecom PLC £27,250

Experian Group Ltd £12,500

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

In the last financial year 2013-14 DWP used the services of Capita Resourcing Limited and Capita Business Services to provide temporary workers. The amounts paid in agency fees were as follows:

Capita Resourcing Limited £9,517,163

Capita Business Services £1,108,082

Both Capita Resourcing Ltd and Capita Business Services provided a managed service to DWP to provide interim personnel and specialist contractors. The figures represent the total fee paid to Capita including the fees paid by Capita to the workers.

8th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 22 November 2016 to Question 53151, if the Government will ensure that the Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme begins to collect data on patient experience and outcomes.

The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) commissions, develops and manages the National Clinical Audit and Patient Outcomes Programme (NCAPOP), on behalf of NHS England, Wales and other devolved administrations. The programme currently consists of over 30 national clinical audits, six clinical outcome review programmes and the National Joint Registry. The Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme is one of the NCAPOP topics.

Patient Reported Experience Measures and Patient Reported Outcome Measures are not routinely commissioned through the NCAPOP.

The design of the clinical audit is a matter for HQIP on behalf of NHS England and the Royal College of Physicians.

7th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 22 November 2016 to Question 53101, on strokes, what criteria NHS England uses to renew or develop condition-specific strategies.

The National Health Service will continue to build on the successes of the current Stroke Strategy. There has been significant, sustained improvement in the quality of stroke care over the last decade and we will continue to deliver our ambition for truly world leading care. That is why the NHS rigorously audits the quality of stroke care across the country each year. It means that we now have some of the fastest improvements in hospital recovery rates for stroke and heart attacks in Europe.

Decisions on whether the stroke strategy should be renewed are a matter for NHS England. As NHS England has moved away from disease specific strategies towards guidance that is more cross cutting, and because the stroke strategy remains valid and implementation of it continues, NHS England has no current plans to renew it.

NHS England’s approach to priority setting was set out in its Five Year Forward View, available at:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/5yfv-web.pdf

NHS England makes decisions about commissioning on advice from its Clinical Priorities Advisory Group, full details of which can be found at:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/cpag/

7th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Oral Answer of 7 February 2017, Official Report, column 226, to the hon. Member for St Ives, what steps his Department is taking to produce a detailed implementation plan to improve stroke services in England.

The National Health Service will continue to build on the successes of the current Stroke Strategy. There has been significant, sustained improvement in the quality of stroke care over the last decade and we will continue to deliver our ambition for truly world leading care. That is why the NHS rigorously audits the quality of stroke care across the country each year. It means that we now have some of the fastest improvements in hospital recovery rates for stroke and heart attacks in Europe.

Decisions on whether the stroke strategy should be renewed are a matter for NHS England. As NHS England has moved away from disease specific strategies towards guidance that is more cross cutting, and because the stroke strategy remains valid and implementation of it continues, NHS England has no current plans to renew it.

NHS England’s approach to priority setting was set out in its Five Year Forward View, available at:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/5yfv-web.pdf

NHS England makes decisions about commissioning on advice from its Clinical Priorities Advisory Group, full details of which can be found at:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/cpag/

10th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 22 November 2016 to Question 53101, what meetings took place on the National Stroke Strategy between (a) Ministers and officials of his Department, (b) Ministers of his Department and representatives of NHS England and (c) officials of his Department and representatives of NHS England in each month since October 2016.

Ministers and officials have met with a range of stakeholders interested in stroke and have discussed a number of topics including the National Stroke Strategy.

19th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps are being taken to ensure physiotherapy is available to people with muscle-wasting conditions at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust as a result of his Department's review of that hospital's therapy service provision.

The Department has made no review of therapy provision at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. That is a matter for the local National Health Service.

NHS England advises that Rushcliffe Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), Nottingham North and East CCG, Nottingham City CCG and Nottingham West CCG this year undertook clinically-led reviews of services that fall outside the national tariff payment mechanism. The reviews were initiated because the CCGs need to ensure they are getting the best value for money when commissioning publicly funded health services.

As part of this work, the CCGs identified some services currently delivered by Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust that could be delivered in a community setting, closer to patients’ homes, providing better value to the local NHS and capacity within local hospitals. The CCGs are committed to continuing to provide the three neurological services provided by the Trust as a single specialty neuro-rehabilitation service provided in the community. This will be supported by the same level of clinical expertise and care as is currently provided.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what meetings Ministers and officials of his Department have had on the National Stroke Strategy since October 2016.

Decisions on whether the stroke strategy should be renewed are a matter for NHS England.

The Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme (SSNAP) collects detailed data on the processes of care that a stroke patient receives in hospital. SSNAP covers all of the key aspects of care identified in the National Stroke Strategy. It also collects data on the care that discharged patients receive from community stroke teams (early supported discharge and community rehabilitation teams as well as bed based rehabilitation facilities) and provides the opportunity for clinicians to enter follow-up data six months after the stroke occurred. However, SSNAP does not collect data on patient experience and outcomes, areas highlighted as important in the strategy.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, which key indicators defined as important in the National Stroke Strategy are not currently measured by the sentinel stroke national audit programme.

Decisions on whether the stroke strategy should be renewed are a matter for NHS England.

The Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme (SSNAP) collects detailed data on the processes of care that a stroke patient receives in hospital. SSNAP covers all of the key aspects of care identified in the National Stroke Strategy. It also collects data on the care that discharged patients receive from community stroke teams (early supported discharge and community rehabilitation teams as well as bed based rehabilitation facilities) and provides the opportunity for clinicians to enter follow-up data six months after the stroke occurred. However, SSNAP does not collect data on patient experience and outcomes, areas highlighted as important in the strategy.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish his evaluation of the National Stroke Strategy for England and the Government's approach to outpatient rehabilitation services for stroke survivors.

There has been no formal evaluation of the National Stroke Strategy. However there is a continuous evaluation of the quality of stroke care via the Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme (SSNAP). This measures most of the key indicators defined as important in the strategy and findings are freely available on the SSNAP website:

https://www.strokeaudit.org/

The Government’s approach to outpatient rehabilitation services for stroke survivors is to encourage clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to commission evidence based care such as early supported discharge and longer term neurorehabilitation. There are some areas where these services are incomplete and NHS England is working with CCGs and the Sustainability and Transformation Plan footprints to address this.

11th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the cost to the public purse has been of storing, maintaining and facilitating research access to the Corsellis Brain Collection in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

The excess costs of maintaining the collection compared with the income from specimen preparation over a number of years have rendered the collection unsustainable as a research resource. West London Mental Health Trust has therefore decided - once it has responded to current requests for samples - to respectfully dispose of those tissue samples for which no scientific purpose can be envisaged. Some tissue has also been requested by the University of Hong Kong for training purposes for their neuropathology students, which the Trust is providing as a more appropriate use of such clinical material than respectful disposal. The Trust has obtained the appropriate Human Tissue Authority licenses for this work. We understand that the collection will close by the end of June 2016.

The Trust has provided figures for each of the three years to 2014/15. In each case the cost has been borne by the Trust, offset (to a relatively small extent) by fees received for tissue sample requests and - in 2014/15 - by a donation. The figures are shown in the following table.

Financial Year

Cost

Income

Donation

2012/13

£101,126

Nil

Nil

2013/14

£84,561

£7,016

Nil

2014/15

£80,684

£1,003

£69,316

The Medical Research Council supports a range of brain tissue banks which have been set-up around specific disorders and diseases generally to collect post-mortem brain tissue from consented donors.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what information his Department holds on the future of the Corsellis Brain Collection at the West London Mental Health NHS Trust; and if he will make a statement.

The excess costs of maintaining the collection compared with the income from specimen preparation over a number of years have rendered the collection unsustainable as a research resource. West London Mental Health Trust has therefore decided - once it has responded to current requests for samples - to respectfully dispose of those tissue samples for which no scientific purpose can be envisaged. Some tissue has also been requested by the University of Hong Kong for training purposes for their neuropathology students, which the Trust is providing as a more appropriate use of such clinical material than respectful disposal. The Trust has obtained the appropriate Human Tissue Authority licenses for this work. We understand that the collection will close by the end of June 2016.

The Trust has provided figures for each of the three years to 2014/15. In each case the cost has been borne by the Trust, offset (to a relatively small extent) by fees received for tissue sample requests and - in 2014/15 - by a donation. The figures are shown in the following table.

Financial Year

Cost

Income

Donation

2012/13

£101,126

Nil

Nil

2013/14

£84,561

£7,016

Nil

2014/15

£80,684

£1,003

£69,316

The Medical Research Council supports a range of brain tissue banks which have been set-up around specific disorders and diseases generally to collect post-mortem brain tissue from consented donors.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will make an assessment of the contribution of the Corsellis Brain Collection to medical research and health improvement in the UK; and if he will make a statement.

Started in the early 1950s by Professor Nick Corsellis at Runwell Hospital, in recent years the Corsellis Collection of brain pathology specimens has been managed and maintained by West London Mental Health Trust (WLMHT). The excess costs of maintaining the collection can only be supported by WLMHT from funds received for patient care. Therefore WLMHT has decided to dispose of the collection by seeking expressions of interest in the brain tissue of value for research, mainly sub-collections of the less common pathologies, and to respectfully dispose of that tissue for which no scientific purpose could be envisaged.

WLMHT has received expressions of interest, but none in taking the complete collection. The original timescale for closure was by the end of March 2016, but WLMHT will support a further three months activity to meet the additional requests for tissue samples. The collection will close by the end of June.

The Department and NHS England have not made any specific assessment of the contribution of the collection to medical research and health improvement in the United Kingdom, or undertaken any specific analysis of the potential effect on medical research of dismantling the collection.

The Medical Research Council supports a range of brain tissue banks which have been set-up around specific disorders and diseases generally to collect post-mortem brain tissue from consented donors.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what analysis his Department or NHS England has undertaken of the potential effect on medical research of dismantling the Corsellis Brain Collection; and if he will place any such analysis in the Library.

Started in the early 1950s by Professor Nick Corsellis at Runwell Hospital, in recent years the Corsellis Collection of brain pathology specimens has been managed and maintained by West London Mental Health Trust (WLMHT). The excess costs of maintaining the collection can only be supported by WLMHT from funds received for patient care. Therefore WLMHT has decided to dispose of the collection by seeking expressions of interest in the brain tissue of value for research, mainly sub-collections of the less common pathologies, and to respectfully dispose of that tissue for which no scientific purpose could be envisaged.

WLMHT has received expressions of interest, but none in taking the complete collection. The original timescale for closure was by the end of March 2016, but WLMHT will support a further three months activity to meet the additional requests for tissue samples. The collection will close by the end of June.

The Department and NHS England have not made any specific assessment of the contribution of the collection to medical research and health improvement in the United Kingdom, or undertaken any specific analysis of the potential effect on medical research of dismantling the collection.

The Medical Research Council supports a range of brain tissue banks which have been set-up around specific disorders and diseases generally to collect post-mortem brain tissue from consented donors.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will direct West London Mental Health Trust to consider mothballing or other alternatives to dismantling the Corsellis Brain Collection.

Started in the early 1950s by Professor Nick Corsellis at Runwell Hospital, in recent years the Corsellis Collection of brain pathology specimens has been managed and maintained by West London Mental Health Trust (WLMHT). The excess costs of maintaining the collection can only be supported by WLMHT from funds received for patient care. Therefore WLMHT has decided to dispose of the collection by seeking expressions of interest in the brain tissue of value for research, mainly sub-collections of the less common pathologies, and to respectfully dispose of that tissue for which no scientific purpose could be envisaged.

WLMHT has received expressions of interest, but none in taking the complete collection. The original timescale for closure was by the end of March 2016, but WLMHT will support a further three months activity to meet the additional requests for tissue samples. The collection will close by the end of June.

The Department and NHS England have not made any specific assessment of the contribution of the collection to medical research and health improvement in the United Kingdom, or undertaken any specific analysis of the potential effect on medical research of dismantling the collection.

The Medical Research Council supports a range of brain tissue banks which have been set-up around specific disorders and diseases generally to collect post-mortem brain tissue from consented donors.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the value of surplus land held by his Department.

As part of the Government’s land disposal programme, the Department of Health has sold land with capacity for more than 3,200 houses, against a target of 3,609. Our current estimate of the value of surplus land remaining, held by this Department, is £54.8 million.

5th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what briefing his Department gave to the media ahead of his speech to the King's Fund on 13 November 2014 in relation to surplus land held by his Department.

The Department did not provide any briefing to media in relation to land held only by the Department.

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 21 January 2015 to Question 221099, and with reference to his speech to the King's Fund on 13 November 2014 in which he cited the claim by the London Health Commission that the total value of surplus NHS estate in the capital is worth £1.5 billion, what information he holds on the evidential basis of that claim; what assessment he has made of whether that claim is compatible with the data given in the Answer; and if he will make a statement.

The London Health Commission figure relates to property assets owned by National Health Service organisations in London. The data given in Question 221099 represented only land and buildings owned nationally by the Department. The two data sets can therefore not be compared.

19th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the amount that his Department will spend on temporary staff in each of the next five years.

The Department uses temporary staff, both civil servants on fixed term contracts and interim and agency workers, to provide flexibility to meet variations in workloads, fill short term resourcing or skills gaps and to help deliver time limited projects. The use of such staff is an important element of managing our resources in the context of the expectation of reducing staffing numbers and admin budgets over the next five years.

The following table shows the estimated spend on payroll-funded staff that are on fixed term contracts, over the next three years. These staff represent around 2.5% of the workforce and around 2.4% of the pay bill.

Estimated spend on payroll staff on fixed term contracts

Item

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Estimated spend for payroll staff on fixed-term contracts

£2.75 million

£2.66 million

£2.58 million

Estimated numbers of staff on fixed-term contracts (full-time equivalent)

49

47.5

46

For interim and agency workers, no forecast is available for the spend on such staff and the Department is looking to reduce their use. All interim and agency staff will be funded from within the Department’s pay budget.

16th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much each surplus building and piece of land owned by his Department is worth; where each such building and piece of land is located; and which such building and piece of land he intends to dispose of.

The Department owns the following sites, which are deemed surplus to requirements and are earmarked for sale. Valuations are shown, where they are available and appropriate to disclose; values have been excluded where disclosure could potentially compromise commercial negotiations. For the remainder of the sites, valuations have not yet been made.

In addition to these sites, the Department retained ownership of several strips of land adjoining sites previously sold where benefit from future development may be gained. Decisions on these retained ”ransom strips” are made as and when development on the adjoining areas is proposed.

Site and Location

Value

Northern

Land at Ashton Rd, Lancaster

Being determined

Land at Peasley Cross, St Helens

Under negotiation

Land at Rooley Avenue, Bradford

Being determined

Leeds, Former St Mary's Hospital

Nominal

East Midlands

Strip of land at Darklands Road, Swadlincote, Derbyshire

Being determined

Warwick Cottage, Ankle Hill, Melton Mowbray

Commercial in confidence

Burial Grounds, South Rauceby, Nr Sleaford

Nil value

West Midlands

Land at Eaves Lane, Bucknall, adjoining Bucknall Hospital.

Commercial in confidence

Land adjoining Princess Royal Hospital, Telford.

£200,000

Land at Somerby Drive, Shrewsbury - adjoining Shelton Hospital

Commercial in confidence

Land at Racecourse Lane, Shrewsbury

Being determined

Eastern

Land at Harp Close Meadow, Waldingfield Road, Sudbury, Suffolk

Commercial in confidence

Kingsley Green, Radlett, Herts.

Commercial in confidence

Little Plumstead, Norfolk Phase 2

£2,575,000

Land at Mollands Lane, South Ockendon, Essex

Nominal

Meacham Clinic, Stratford Rd, Wolverton. Milton Keynes

£380,000

Ropewalk House, 32 Kings Lane, St Neots

£252,000

London

15 Ambleside, Streatham

£529,500

67 Warwick Road, Kensington

£1,222,000

Hazel Court, St John's Hill, Battersea

£1,672,000

Edward Wilson House, Battersea

Being determined

N3 Site - Carlton Gate, Elmfield Way, London W9

Being determined

South East

Stoke Mandeville Bucks. Stadium

Nil

St Michael's Hospice, Basingstoke

Commercial in confidence

Land at Bob Dunn Way, Dartford

£850,000

Abbey Road, Ilford

Being determined

South West

Oaklands, Plymouth

£250,000

Halcyon House, Plymouth

Commercial in confidence

Farm Lane House, Plymouth

£226,250

Land at the rear of 3 & 5 Spurfield Cottages, Exminster

Commercial in confidence

Land to rear of 1-4 Farm Lane cottages, Exminster

Being determined - dependent on planning.

11th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether Health Education England monitors the quality of child autism awareness training in NHS hospital emergency departments; and if he will make a statement.

Health Education England (HEE) provides national direction and leadership on high quality healthcare education and training, working with regulators, Royal Colleges and other stakeholders on curricula to ensure that the NHS workforce provides the highest standards of care for patients, including children and young people. The content and standard of healthcare professional training is the responsibility of the regulators, which are independent statutory bodies. They have the general function of promoting high standards of education and co-ordinating all stages of education to ensure that students and newly qualified professionals are equipped with the knowledge, skills and attitudes essential for professional practice.

The Emergency Medicine curriculum is designed by the College of Emergency Medicine, within standards set by the independent regulator, the General Medical Council. It contains explicit requirements to be aware of the impact of any chronic illness or disability on the presentation and management of patients in the Emergency Department. All Emergency physicians are required to be trained to level 3 safeguarding skills which encompasses being cognisant of these conditions and ensuring the patient condition is fully assessed and adjustments made as required.

For the employed workforce, HEE does not directly control the Continued Professional Development activity of specialist staff but does, however, spend approximately £215 million per year on activities which together are termed as ‘workforce development’.

22nd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether the Government plans to introduce legislative proposals related to the agreement reached on the UK's relationship with the EU at the European Council on 19 February 2016.

At the February European Council, the Government negotiated a new settlement giving the UK a special status in a reformed EU.

The Government's view is that the UK will be stronger, safer and better off remaining in a reformed EU. The UK does intend to pass domestic legislation where necessary to underpin this settlement, following a vote to remain in the EU in the referendum.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 104 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC17, what the amount spent was on each instance of travel expenditure totalling more than £1,000.

Before undertaking any travel staff must consider whether the journey is necessary and cost effective. We encourage staff to find alternatives to travel, such as video-conferencing facilities in a further effort to reduce the number of flights needed. Due to the nature of our diplomatic work, however, travel is essential.

The sum referred to on page 104 of the 13/14 Annual Accounts is £48.5m for Travel incurred under the delivery of our overseas programmes. These figures cannot be broken down further without incurring disproportionate costs.

Further detail of our Programmes can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/foreign-commonwealth-office/about#our-funding-programmes

Further details of senior officials and ministers travel can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/minister-data

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/pus-data.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 104 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC17, what the reasons are for the £3.2m expenditure listed under consular.

The £3.32m expenditure listed under consular on page 104 of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14 include payments ranging from Emergency Travel Documents and other passport stationery to consular crisis and human rights work.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 104 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC17, what the amount spent was on each instance of contractor, consultancy and fee-based services expenditure totalling more than £1,000.

This information is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 104 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC 17, what the amount spent was on each instance of business hospitality expenditure totalling more than £500.

This information is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.
20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 104 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC 17, what the amount spent was on each instance of property rental expenditure totalling more than £5,000.

During 2013-14, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) paid rental, service and condominium charges for properties in the UK and overseas totalling £83,067,963, of which:

  • Residential accommodation - £47,705,887
  • Non-residential accommodation - £35,362,076

Residential accommodation incorporates the rental, service and condominium charges for all FCO staff working overseas, including staff working for Partners Across Government on the FCO overseas network. Non-residential accommodation incorporates the rental, service and condominium charges for offices and ancillary buildings. Any contracts over £10,000 can be found at http://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

To break these figures down further would incur disproportionate costs and payments to private landlords would not be provided as this would be commercially sensitive.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 107 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC17, what the value is of each piece of residential land worth more than £250,000.

The net book value of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s property (land and buildings) in the UK and overseas as at 31 March 2014 was £2,030m. This excludes property held by our Non-Departmental Public Bodies. Individual valuations per property cannot be provided as this information is commercially sensitive.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 107 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC17, what the value is of each dwelling worth more than £250,000.

The net book value of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s property (land and buildings) in the UK and overseas as at 31 March 2014 was £2,030m. This excludes property held by our Non-Departmental Public Bodies. Individual valuations per property cannot be provided as this information is commercially sensitive.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 107 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC17, what the value is of each antique and work of art worth more than £1,000.

The net book value of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s Antiques and Works of Art in the UK and overseas as at 31 March 2014 was £16.672m. Individual valuations per item cannot be provided as this information is both commercially sensitive and would represent a security threat to the staff and properties.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 107 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC17, what the value is of each building (excluding dwellings) worth more than £250,000.

The net book value of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s property (land and buildings) in the UK and overseas as at 31 March 2014 was £2,030m. This excludes property held by our Non-Departmental Public Bodies. Individual valuations per property cannot be provided as this information is commercially sensitive.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 107 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC17, what the value is of each piece of non-residential land worth more than £250,000.

The net book value of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s property (land and buildings) in the UK and overseas as at 31 March 2014 was £2,030m. This excludes property held by our Non-Departmental Public Bodies. Individual valuations per property cannot be provided as this information is commercially sensitive.

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 105 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, HC17, what the reasons are for the £1.397m expenditure listed under other subscriptions.

Individual subscriptions are disclosed in the Annual Report and Accounts if they amount to over £1m. The £1.397 million expenditure listed under other subscriptions on page 105 includes payments to the Commonwealth Foundation (~£726.5k), the Institute for Security Studies (~£533k), the International Bureau of Expositions (~£20.5k) and the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environmental Programme (~£117.7k).

20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to page 77 of the British Council's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, what the value is of each tangible fixed asset worth more than £250,000.

The net book value of the British Council’s tangible fixed assets as at 31 March 2014 was £165,850,000. Individual valuations per asset cannot be provided as this information is commercially sensitive.

2nd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to note 19 on page 106 of the British Council's Annual Report, 2013-14, what the reasons were for the losses and special payments.

As stated in the British Council's Annual Report, during the year ended 31 March 2014, the British Council made no payments that fall within the category of special payments as defined in Managing Public Money.

The losses referenced in the Annual Report fall into three major categories:

1) £1.9m worth of claims waived or abandoned. This included a write off of £1.7m worth of fees for work done in 2011-12. These fees were owed by education institutions in a country where the deteriorating political and security situation meant they are not likely to be recoverable in the foreseeable future. £0.4m of this was provided for in the year to March 2013 and only the balance was charged in the year ended March 2014. The debt was part of the Council’s full cost recovery work and no grant-in-aid funds were involved. Approval was sought from HMT and granted.

2) £540k worth of fruitless payments. This included:

a) £402k (122 cases) of historic contract balances from 2007 to 2010 in relation to funds granted to beneficiaries under the Youth in Action agreement, which were deemed ineligible for reimbursements to the British Council by the European Union. These were provided for in the year to 31 March 2013.

b) £137k in relation to a final court judgement of damages due from a long running court case in the UAE about a failed premises project that concluded in January 2014.

3) £170k worth of cash losses. This included net losses from frauds in Kenya and Senegal disclosed in the Governance Statement on page 54 of the Annual Report.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

All contingent labour (provision of temporary workers) procured by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office is provided by Hayes Specialist Recruitment. In the last financial year (2013/14) £476,000 was paid to Hays in agency fees.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

For the past financial year (2013-2014) the 10 organisations paid most by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) for consultancy and the associated spend figures were as follows: ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION & DEVELOPMENT (OECD) £285,579.00 DLA PIPER UK LLP £148,283.34 CBRE LTD £103,412.14 FIELD FISHER WATERHOUSE £52,940.75 FONNEGRA GERLEIN S.A £50,745.43 SAMSON AND MCGRATH £34,136.41 ACCENTURE (UK) LTD £29,892.00 DTZ CONSULTING AND RESEARCH £28,700.00 HOGAN LOVELLS INTERNATIONAL LLP £26,153.81 HERBERT SMITH FREEHILLS £21,061.27
8th May 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department made of the number of people that would invest in a Lifetime ISA; how many people have invested in a Lifetime ISA; and if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of closing the Lifetime ISA to new entrants.

The Lifetime ISA was introduced in 2017 to encourage younger people to get into the habit of saving for the long term. The Tax Information and Impact Note for the Lifetime LISA estimated over 200,000 accounts would be opened in the first year. Initial reports to HMRC for the 2017/18 tax year show approximately 170,000 accounts were opened. We expect the final figure for 2017/18 to change as a result of the receipt of late or amended returns from providers. The Government keeps all aspects of the tax system under review. Where appropriate, future changes may be made through the annual Budget process.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th May 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the (a) cost to the public purse and (b) potential merits of the introduction of an ISA dashboard.

The Government notes the Association of Accounting Technicians Individual Savings Account Working Group’s proposals regarding ISAs, including the introduction of an ISA dashboard. The Chancellor of the Exchequer keeps all tax policy under review and information provided to us is considered as part of this process.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Nov 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to set before Parliament the itemised liabilities due for payment by the Government to the EU in respect of the forthcoming withdrawal agreement; and if he will make a statement.

The arrangements for exiting the European Union, including any financial settlement, are currently under negotiation. The Government’s broad position was set out by the Prime Minister in her speech in Florence: we do not want our European Partners to fear they will need to pay more or receive less over the remainder of the current budget plan as a result of our decision to leave, and the UK will honour commitments we have made during the period of our membership.

Ongoing discussions with the European Commission are focused on building a common technical understanding on every item in the financial settlement and we are making clear progress in this area.

I would direct The Honourable Gentlemen to the Treasury’s answer to his urgent Parliamentary Question on 29th November, where I confirmed the Government will update the house when there is more detail to give.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
6th Feb 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the top 20 categories as defined by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) were according to value of imports of goods imported into the UK in the most recent year for which records are available; and how much HMRC collected in gross customs duties in each of those categories.

The top 20 categories as defined by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC), according to the value of imports into the UK and how much HMRC collected in gross customs duties in each of those categories, are set in the below table. This data covers the period from 1 December 2015 to 30 November 2016.

Rank

Tariff Chapter

Tariff Description

Customs Duty Paid

1

84

Nuclear reactors, boilers, machinery and mechanical appliances; parts thereof

£150,361,671.11

2

87

Vehicles other than railway or tramway rolling stock, and parts and accessories thereof

£275,986,917.79

3

85

Electrical machinery and equipment and parts thereof; sound recorders and reproducers, television image and sound recorders and reproducers, and parts and accessories of such articles

£221,484,925.55

4

61

Articles of apparel and clothing accessories, knitted or crocheted

£391,863,383.24

5

71

Natural or cultured pearls, precious or semi-precious stones, precious metals, metals clad with precious metal and articles thereof; imitation jewellery; coins

£18,816,020.49

6

62

Articles of apparel and clothing accessories, not knitted or crocheted

£421,133,522.33

7

27

Mineral fuels, mineral oils and products of their distillation; bituminous substances; mineral waxes

£2,027,350.73

8

88

Aircraft, spacecraft, and parts thereof

£6,550,507.58

9

97

Works of art, collectors' pieces and antiques

£160.60

10

73

Articles of iron or steel

£44,803,950.05

11

90

Optical, photographic, cinematographic, measuring, checking, precision, medical or surgical instruments and apparatus; parts and accessories thereof

£46,001,258.87

12

64

Footwear, gaiters and the like; parts of such articles

£263,335,200.26

13

39

Plastics and articles thereof

£176,508,703.45

14

94

Furniture; bedding, mattresses, mattress supports, cushions and similar stuffed furnishings; lamps and lighting fittings, not elsewhere specified or included; illuminated signs, illuminated nameplates and the like; prefabricated buildings

£51,244,638.13

15

95

Toys, games and sports requisites; parts and accessories thereof

£73,082,253.07

16

30

Pharmaceutical products

£0.00

17

82

Tools, implements, cutlery, spoons and forks, of base metal; parts thereof of base metal

£23,187,892.86

18

40

Rubber and articles thereof

£36,571,397.53

19

63

Other made-up textile articles; sets; worn clothing and worn textile articles; rags

£89,399,258.34

20

42

Articles of leather; saddlery and harness; travel goods, handbags and similar containers; articles of animal gut (other than silkworm gut)

£55,873,412.99

19th Dec 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to publish an estimate of the potential effect on the public finances of the UK's decision to leave the EU; and if he will make a statement.

The Government continues to undertake a range of analyses to inform the UK’s position for the upcoming EU exit negotiations. We are seeking the best possible arrangement for the United Kingdom and the work being conducted reflects this.

24th Nov 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking as part of the negotiations for the UK to leave the EU to improve the competitiveness of the UK insurance industry.

The UK insurance industry is the largest in Europe and the third largest in the world. The government is aware of the important contribution of insurance to the nation’s economy and it is also keen to ensure the industry remains competitive as the United Kingdom leaves the European Union. The steps we will take in the EU negotiations will be to achieve the best possible deal for the financial services sector as a whole.

In the meantime, the government continues to improve competitiveness and encourage growth in the sector. For example, as announced in the Autumn Statement, the government is consulting on draft regulations which will introduce a competitive regulatory and tax regime for Insurance Linked Securities in the UK. The regulations are designed to allow the UK to compete in this innovative area and will enhance our position as a global insurance hub.

22nd Nov 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the recent EU Commission capital requirement directive proposal for foreign banks operating in the EU to set aside specific capital within EU intermediary holding companies on the long-term interests of the UK as a global financial centre; and if he will make a statement.

Following publication of the proposal on 23rd November, we are performing analysis to evaluate the impact of these rules. How much the proposals might affect individual EEA groups operating in the UK would depend on their particular group structure.

The rules are not final, but are the starting point for negotiations. The proposals will be taken forward in Council and the European Parliament, and the UK will continue to engage fully in that process, where we will robustly defend Britain’s interest.

The UK already requires that subsidiaries of large foreign financial firms in London are well capitalised, meeting local capital and liquidity requirements.

24th Mar 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to Table 2.1 of the March Budget 2013, what his most recent estimate is of the effect of employee shareholder status income tax measures in 2015-16.

The most recent estimate of the Exchequer cost in 2015-16 of employee shareholder status from Income Tax and National Insurance Contribution relief is the figure published in Table 2.1 of the 2013 March Budget.

24th Mar 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 14 March 2016 to Question 30533, for what reasons a separate breakdown for revenue accrued from financial spread betting and other general betting duties is not available; and if he will make a statement.

Published information on General Betting Duty receipts is not split down into constituent types of bets (such as financial or other types of spread bets).

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
9th Mar 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people have taken up employee shareholder status tax relief in the most recent financial year for which figures are available; and what the effect of that relief was on revenue to the Exchequer in that year.

No details of the number of employees receiving and companies offering Employee Shareholder Status shares are currently available. Similarly, no details of the effect of the tax relief are available.

9th Mar 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what revenue accrued to the Exchequer from the financial spread betting gross profits tax in the most recent financial year for which figures are available.

Total receipts from General Betting Duty, which includes duty paid on spread bets from financial and non-financial institutions is published here:

https://www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/Pages/TaxAndDutybulletins.aspx

A separate breakdown for revenue accrued from financial spread betting is not available.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
20th Jul 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish a distributional analysis of the effect of the measures announced in the Summer Budget 2015 on people in each income group decile.

Distributional analysis of the impact of government policy across the household income distribution was published alongside the Summer Budget, and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/443229/PU1822_Distributional_Analysis.pdf

20th Jul 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish a distributional analysis of the effect of the Summer Budget 2015 for (a) 2015-16 and (b) 2016-17.

Distributional analysis of the impact of government policy across the household income distribution was published alongside the Summer Budget, and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/443229/PU1822_Distributional_Analysis.pdf

24th Mar 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the number of pensioners liable to pay income tax in the 2013-14 financial year who (a) did not have online access to and (b) were not sent tax forms by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC); and what steps HMRC is taking to ensure those pensioners have access to such forms.

An estimated 6.25 million taxpayers were over the state pension age in 2013-14. Figures of those pensioners who do not have online access is not held by HMRC.

The Government announced at Budget 2015 the transformation of the tax system over the next parliament by introducing digital tax accounts for all individuals, removing the need for annual tax returns. It will be the choice of individuals whether they use these digital accounts.

For many, the transition to digital accounts will be simple. But for those who have difficulty in going online or who need extra help, HMRC will continue to provide extra help and support.

19th Mar 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the (a) total and (b) staff cost to his Department was of producing the document, An alternative fiscal path beyond 2016-17, published on 19 March 2015.

In line with the Ministerial Code, as the Chief Secretary to the Treasury I asked Treasury officials to calculate the impact on the fiscal aggregates of a set for alternative assumptions on tax and spend for the years beyond 2016-17. All costs were met from within existing budgets.

19th Mar 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many officials in his Department were involved in producing the document, An alternative fiscal path beyond 2016-17, published on 19 March 2015.

In line with the Ministerial Code, as the Chief Secretary to the Treasury I asked Treasury officials to calculate the impact on the fiscal aggregates of a set for alternative assumptions on tax and spend for the years beyond 2016-17. All costs were met from within existing budgets.

13th Mar 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what fees are payable to JP Morgan for its role in managing the trading plan to sell the remaining holdings of Government held shares in Lloyds Banking Group.

On 17 December 2014 the Chancellor authorised the sale of a third part of the government’s shareholding in Lloyds Banking Group via a trading plan. The plan is ongoing and will end no later than 30 June 2015. Morgan Stanley act as broker on behalf of HM Treasury to execute the trading plan.

Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) rules require HMG as seller to inform the market each time its shareholding has crossed through a one percentage point threshold, which is typically released via RNS by the company. Lloyds have therefore released two such statements since the launch of the trading plan, on 23 February and 9 March 2015. These contain details of the government’s remaining shareholding in Lloyds. On both occasions, the government released a statement confirming these announcements.

On 9 March 2015 the government confirmed that the total amount of money raised through the trading plan was over £1bn and that the government’s shareholding in Lloyds had fallen below 23%.

As I informed the House in my written statement on 18 December, a statement will be laid before Parliament with further details at the end of the plan. In order to get the best deal for the taxpayer, I will not provide a running commentary on the price of shares and the precise number sold while the trading plan is ongoing. However, the Chancellor has made clear that no shares will be sold below the average price the previous government paid for them (i.e. 73.6p).

13th Mar 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his Department's announcement, Government sells more shares in Lloyds through trading plan, published on 9 March 2015, how many shares in Lloyds Banking Group the Government sold, and at what price per share.

On 17 December 2014 the Chancellor authorised the sale of a third part of the government’s shareholding in Lloyds Banking Group via a trading plan. The plan is ongoing and will end no later than 30 June 2015. Morgan Stanley act as broker on behalf of HM Treasury to execute the trading plan.

Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) rules require HMG as seller to inform the market each time its shareholding has crossed through a one percentage point threshold, which is typically released via RNS by the company. Lloyds have therefore released two such statements since the launch of the trading plan, on 23 February and 9 March 2015. These contain details of the government’s remaining shareholding in Lloyds. On both occasions, the government released a statement confirming these announcements.

On 9 March 2015 the government confirmed that the total amount of money raised through the trading plan was over £1bn and that the government’s shareholding in Lloyds had fallen below 23%.

As I informed the House in my written statement on 18 December, a statement will be laid before Parliament with further details at the end of the plan. In order to get the best deal for the taxpayer, I will not provide a running commentary on the price of shares and the precise number sold while the trading plan is ongoing. However, the Chancellor has made clear that no shares will be sold below the average price the previous government paid for them (i.e. 73.6p).

13th Mar 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons details of the latest sale of Government held shares in Lloyds Banking Group were not published by UK Financial Investments.

On 17 December 2014 the Chancellor authorised the sale of a third part of the government’s shareholding in Lloyds Banking Group via a trading plan. The plan is ongoing and will end no later than 30 June 2015. Morgan Stanley act as broker on behalf of HM Treasury to execute the trading plan.

Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) rules require HMG as seller to inform the market each time its shareholding has crossed through a one percentage point threshold, which is typically released via RNS by the company. Lloyds have therefore released two such statements since the launch of the trading plan, on 23 February and 9 March 2015. These contain details of the government’s remaining shareholding in Lloyds. On both occasions, the government released a statement confirming these announcements.

On 9 March 2015 the government confirmed that the total amount of money raised through the trading plan was over £1bn and that the government’s shareholding in Lloyds had fallen below 23%.

As I informed the House in my written statement on 18 December, a statement will be laid before Parliament with further details at the end of the plan. In order to get the best deal for the taxpayer, I will not provide a running commentary on the price of shares and the precise number sold while the trading plan is ongoing. However, the Chancellor has made clear that no shares will be sold below the average price the previous government paid for them (i.e. 73.6p).

9th Mar 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to reply to Question 224839 tabled on 20 February 2015 for answer on 25 February 2015.

I have done so.

20th Feb 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the (a) purchase and (b) installation cost was of the banner used at his speaking engagement at the Tate Modern on 20 February 2015.

Treasury ministers and officials communicate with a wide range of bodies on a regular basis. All costs are met from within existing departmental budgets.

28th Oct 2014
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many officials in his Department have had responsibility for monitoring gross national income accounting changes and their effect on the UK contribution to the EU in the last 12 months.

Economic statistics that impact upon the UK’s contribution to the EU budget such as gross national income and VAT affect a wide range of areas within HM Treasury and as a consequence will include a large number of different officials.

28th Oct 2014
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, when his Department was first made aware of the EU Statistical Office revisions to the UK's gross national income and value added tax balances and subsequent calculation of an EU member state's contribution to the 2014 Amending Budget.

As my Rt Hon Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer told the House on 4 November, Col 565, there was a meeting at the Commission on Friday 17 October. On Tuesday 21 October, Treasury officials prepared advice for the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and the Prime Minister was aware of the advice on Thursday 23 October. That is very similar to the timetable that the Dutch Government have set out.

9th Jul 2014
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much the Government has spent per capita on infrastructure in each region and constituent part of the UK in each of the last five years.

Table 1 Total identifiable expenditure on capital services by country and region, per head 2008-09 to 2012-13

Please see attached infrastructure table.

Sources:

Expenditure data is taken from the Country and Regional Analyses 2013. In order to calculate per head figures the latest mid-year population estimates; for England and Wales from the ONS; for Scotland from the GRO and; for Northern Ireland from the NISRA.

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to improve support for small and medium-sized enterprises which are in need of short-term assistance and flexibility through improved partnership working between the HM Revenue and Custom's (HMRC) simplified import VAT accounting duty deferment team and the HMRC debt management and time-to-pay teams; and if he will make a statement.

The Simplified Import VAT Accounting (SIVA) scheme is a trade facilitation measure that reduces compliance costs for legitimate traders through the removal of the requirement to provide a guarantee to secure import VAT paid through the duty deferment scheme.

The risk to the tax revenue by traders operating SIVA is potentially very large as the period between the tax due being deferred and being collected by HMRC may result in a failure to pay. The setting of the SIVA approval criteria has to strike a balance between ensuring the trade receive the maximum benefit from the scheme, while at the same time protecting the revenue.

Businesses have to demonstrate on-going compliance with the SIVA requirements. The SIVA team monitor this through internal systems, including any outstanding debts or Time-to Pay agreements requested. When they identify a business experiencing difficulties, they advise them of the potential impact on their SIVA approval. Warning letters are issued by the team to businesses who fail to comply and only if there is evidence of continued non-compliance is the approval removed.

The current procedures provide an appropriate balance between trade faciliation and protection of the revenue.

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

Since January 2011, central government departments have been required to publish on Contracts Finder information on the contracts they award (www.contractsfinder.businesslink.gov.uk/).

In addition, departments publish details of spend in excess of £25,000 at www.gov.uk/government/collections/25000-spend .

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

Under this Government's transparency programme, contracts are published on Contracts Finder which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

In addition all Departments publish details of transactions above £25,000. Data for HM Treasury can be found at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/25000-spend

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion and value of his Department's contracts have been let (a) under the restricted procedure, (b) by the open procedure, (c) via framework agreements and (d) via a tendering process involving the use of a pre-qualification questionnaire in each of the last three years.

Since January 2011, central government departments have been required to publish on Contracts Finder information on the tenders issued and contracts they award with a value over £10,000 (excluding VAT) (www.gov.uk/contractsfinder).

Public Procurement Regulations require that prescribed procurement procedures are used when procurements exceed the EU contract threshold values. This legal framework helps to ensure that public procurement is conducted in a fair and open manner both within the UK and across the EU.

Less than two percent of all contracts were let under the restricted procedure in each of the last three years.

In 2010/11 there was one contract let under the restricted procedure. This was for actuarial support to the independent commission on Equitable Life Payments that was set up by this government to recommend how best to fairly allocate funds provided for the Equitable Life Payments Scheme (ELPS) and had a contract value of £1million.

In 2011/12 there were two contracts let under the restricted procedure. They were (i) Corporate Financial Advice framework contract (estimated contract value of £5 million over the 2 years but no guaranteed spend)and (ii) a contract for actuarial support for (ELPS) in making fair and transparent payments to Equitable Life policyholders who suffered financial losses as a result of Government maladministration which occurred in the regulation of Equitable Life. The contract value was £5.4 million.

The information requested for the proportion and value of HM Treasury contracts that have been let via framework agreements and where a tendering process involving the use of a pre-qualification questionnaire in each of the last three years is not readily available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will detail the alternative entry requirements facing EU citizens arriving in the UK after 1 November 2019 following her announcement to end freedom of movement from the EU into the UK.

When the UK leaves the European Union (EU) on 31 October, free movement as it currently stands will end, if the UK leaves without a deal. The details of new immigration arrangements for EU citizens moving to the UK after a no deal Brexit were announced on 4 September (https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-statement/Commons/2019-09-04/HCWS1817/).

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what processes his Department has put in place for an EU citizen arriving in the UK to prove to immigration officials at the point of entry that they are eligible to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme in the event that freedom of movement between the EU and UK ends on 1 November 2019; and if she will make a statement.

We are leaving the European Union on 31 October 2019 and, in a no deal Brexit, freedom of movement as it currently stands will end then.

The Prime Minister has been clear that we want EU citizens who are resident in the UK by exit to stay and they will be eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme to enable them to do so. In a no deal Brexit, they will have until at least 31 December 2020 to apply. Until then, they will continue to be able to use their EU passport or national identity card to prove their rights to work and rent property; and will have the same rights to work and access benefits and services as they have now.

Border crossing arrangements will not change on 1 November 2019; EU citizens will continue to cross the border as they do now, using their passport or national identity card. They will be able to use e-Gates if they are travelling on a biometric passport, and they will not face routine intentions testing.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what criteria her Department plans to use to require non-UK EU citizens to undertake visa clearance prior to arrival in the UK after 1 November 2019; and if she will make a statement.

We are leaving the EU on 31 October and this will mean that freedom of movement as it currently stands will end on 31 October.

Whether we leave the EU with or without a deal, the Government has announced that EEA and Swiss nationals will be able to continue to travel to the UK for holidays or short-term trips, without needing a visa.

The arrangements for people coming to the UK for longer periods of time and for work and study will change. Details of changes immediately after 31 October and improvements to the previous government’s plans for a new immigration system are being developed.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
26th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many arrests were made for hate crimes against people with learning disabilities in (a) 2018 and (b) 2017.

The Home Office collects and publishes statistics on the number of arrests, conducted by each police force in England and Wales, on an annual basis.

Data are held at the offence group level only (for example ‘Violence against the person’ and ‘Public order’ offences). Information on the number of arrests for hate crimes against people with learning disabilities are not held centrally.

Data are published in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, the latest of which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2018

12th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will meet representatives of the British Muslim charities sector to discuss concerns about the level of prejudice and unfair stigmatisation they may encounter in the course of their work; and if she will make a statement.

Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations and individuals. Details of these meetings are published on the Cabinet Office website on a quarterly basis.

I would be happy to consider further engagement as appropriate.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by her Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

Information on the 10 consultancy firms that were paid the most by the Home Department for the last financial year and how much each of those firms were paid is set out in the table below:

Supplier Name

Total Cost/Value

1. DETICA LTD

£7,220,985

2. PA CONSULTING SERVICES LTD

£6,084,558

3. ERNST AND YOUNG LLP

£2,575,080

4. KPMG LLP

£2,259,099

5. DELOITTE

£855,360

6. PRICE WATERHOUSE COOPERS LLP

£676,871

7. BROADCASTING SUPPORT SERVICES

£387,268

8. X-NET

£298,407

9. ROKE MANOR RESEARCH LIMITED

£94,262

10. iO1 LTD

£45,704

9th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much in real terms his Department spent on public opinion polling in each of the last 10 years.

The central communications directorate of the Ministry of Defence has spent the following amounts on public opinion polling since March 2012.

2012£55,500
2013£49,500

Information on any polls conducted on behalf of other constituent parts of the department or the Armed Forces in addition to those above are not included, as this information is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Prior to March 2012, polling services were procured through the Central Office of Information. We are unable to identify the costs of those surveys in previous years because of the way the information was recorded.

The Department has yet to be charged for the survey that took place in September 2014.

28th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, for what reasons his Department's Annual Report and Accounts for 2013-14 has not yet been published; and when that report is due to be published.

The Government Resources and Accounts Act 2000 requires HM Treasury to lay the accounts of departments before the House of Commons not later than 31 January of the financial year following that to which they relate.

The accounts of the Ministry of Defence for 2013-14 will be laid before Parliament in accordance with that statutory deadline.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The Ministry of Defence uses a process called “manpower substitution” to engage temporary staff at agreed fixed rates on a national basis through a number of contracts. Manpower substitutes are employed for up to 11 months to fill vacant, funded posts. The majority are brought in to fill medical and dental requirements at military medical centres to cover for military positions that are vacant due to deployment into operational theatre. This enables the medical services to continue to provide the best possible care to members of the Armed Forces.

The five companies most frequently used by the Ministry of Defence in Financial Year 2013-14 to provide temporary workers, and the associated fees paid to each, are presented in the following table:

Company

Type of worker

Number of Temporary Workers

Fees Paid

HoneyBee

Medical & Dental

790

£3.46m

CastleRock Ltd

Medical & Dental

490

£2.61m

Capita Resourcing

Interim Professionals

320

£2.07m

Hayes

Medical & Dental

190

£0.59m

Reed

Clerical & Admin

160

£0.11m

The figures provided for Capita Resourcing cover the period from April 2013 to March 2014. All other data cover the period April 2013 to February 2014. Data is extracted from the MOD's centralised Manpower Substitution Service database and does not include any localised arrangements that individual Top Level Budget holders may have with other companies.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The top ten companies which provided external assistance to the Ministry of Defence in financial year 2012-13 are listed in the attached table.

3rd Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Answer of 24 March 2016 to Question 32596, if he will place in the Library the spreadsheet used to calculate the allocation of the 2016-17 transition grant to individual authorities.

The Secretary of State has published an explanatory note setting out the method of calculation of the Transition Grant. Copies have been made available in the libraries of both Houses. It is available to view at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/510870/Explanatory_note_on_the_allocation_of_the_Transition_Grant.pdf.

The spreadsheet showing individual authority allocations was published on 8 February as part of the Core Spending Power: Supporting Information tables: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/corespending-power-final-local-government-finance-settlement-2016-to-2017.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
24th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to the final local government finance settlement 2016-17, published on 8 February 2016, if he will place a copy of the (a) methodology used for calculating the distribution and (b) detailed model used to calculate the allocation to each individual authority of the 2016-17 transitional grant in the Library; and if he will make a statement.

The Secretary of State has published an explanatory note setting out the method of calculation of the Transition Grant. Copies have been made available in the libraries of both Houses. It is available to view at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/510870/Explanatory_note_on_the_allocation_of_the_Transition_Grant.pdf.

Individual authority allocations were published on 8 February as part of the Core Spending Power: Supporting Information tables: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/corespending-power-final-local-government-finance-settlement-2016-to-2017.

The Secretary of State has already addressed questions from the House on this matter. I refer the hon. Member to the debate on Local Government Finance Report (England) on 10 February, Official Report, Columns 1643-1645.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
8th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the duration of his Department's lease at 2 Marsham Street is; and what break clause arrangements there are.

The move to 2 Marsham Street will reduce my Department's running costs by £9 million a year from 2015-16. Overall, these changes will save the Government £24 million a year.

The Department does not have a lease for 2 Marsham Street. Our co-location with the Home Office is formalised through an inter-department Memorandum of Terms of Occupation.

Since 2010, the Department has had considerable success in reducing the cost of its wider estate through the rationalisation of retained office space and targeted building disposals. This has seen the Department surrender six leasehold office properties through a combination of lease breaks and expiries, generating net savings in the period of around £7 million per annum. The Department has also successfully sub-let surplus space across its leasehold office estate during the same period, reducing the overall property costs by around £6.5 million per annum.

Building on this success, in 2013-14, we have already secured further savings of £4.6 million by subletting further space in Eland House in London. Most recently, the Department negotiated the early surrender of Eland House and is scheduled to relocate to 2 Marsham Street.

This illustrates the scope for local government and, indeed, the public sector as a whole to make sensible savings through better property management.

In June 2013, supporting the Prime Minister's commitment to support the development of small and medium enterprises, the Department agreed terms with business incubator providers to take vacant space at 2 Rivergate House in Bristol and Bridge House, Guildford. This is an important part of the Government's drive to assist the start-up and small and medium enterprises business and we are also working with the Government Property Unit on potential Government Space for Growth opportunities in other properties held by DCLG.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

In answering this question, we have used the Cabinet Office definition for contingent labour (temporary staff) which includes admin and clerical agency staff, interim managers and specialist contractors: use of such staff for short-term or specialist work can be better value for money than hiring staff on permanent contracts.

Details of the five companies that my Department has used most often in the last financial year for the provision of contingent labour are set out below:

Financial Year 2013-14

Organisation

Total Expenditure (excluding VAT)

Capita Resourcing Ltd

£1,736,580

Reed Employment Services

£172,702

Reed Specialist Recruitment Ltd

£136,335

Manpower UK Ltd

£40,423

Premier Employment Group Ltd

£22,677

To put this in context, my Department has cut spending on contingent labour from £14.4 million in 2009-10 to £3.3 million in 2013-14 as a result of the tightening of its internal management controls, institutionalising these in its systems and adhering to Treasury and Cabinet Office spending rules. This represents a saving of £11.1 million a year (2013-14 compared to 2009-10)

In addition to the savings on temporary workers, our departmental audited annual accounts for the core Department show that staff costs fell from £216 million in 2009-10 to £99 million in 2012-13, a reduction of 54% in cash terms, or a further saving of £117 million a year.

These savings also reflect the Coalition Government's agenda of decentralisation, ending the micromanagement of local government, the abolition of regional government, and the broader need to tackle the deficit left by the last Administration.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The table below sets out the ten consultancy firms that were paid the most by my Department in the last financial year

The data complies with definitions on Consultancy laid down by the Cabinet Office which excludes agency staff and interim (contingent) labour.

Financial Year 2013-14

Organisation

Total Expenditure (excluding VAT)

Local Partnership LLP*

£150,918

PricewaterhouseCoopers

£108,516

Ove Arup & Partners

£66,790

Amec Environment & Infrastructure

£62,509

Ernest & Young LLP

£20,000

Capgemini UK Plc

£17,000

Grant Thornton UK LLP

£8,815

Giant Professional Limited

£6,400

Oakleigh Consulting Ltd

£4,950

Land Use Consultants

£1,345

* Local Partnerships is a company that is jointly owned by HM Treasury and the Local Government Association; it provides commercial expertise on matters of infrastructure, legal and contractual complexity and acts for the benefit of the public sector.

My Department has cut spending on consultancy from £36.6 million in 2009-10 to £0.5 million in 2013-14. This represents a saving of £36.1 million a year (2013-14 compared to 2009-10) and has been achieved through contract renegotiations, terminations and adherence to Cabinet Office controls on consultancy spending.

To put this in context, based on current estimates (which reflect accounting consequences from machinery of government changes) the DCLG Group is reducing its annual running costs by around 40% in real terms between 2010-11 and 2014-15. This equates to net savings of at least £532 million over this spending review period and includes savings of around £420 million from the closure of the Government Offices for the Regions.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
26th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) prosecutions and (b) convictions there were for hate crimes against people with learning disabilities in (i) 2018 and (ii) 2017.

The Ministry of Justice has published information regarding prosecutions and convictions but the only hate crime offences specifically defined in legislation are ‘racially or religiously aggravated’ offences. The court outcomes for these offences can be found here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/802314/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2018.xlsx

Filter by ‘Offence’ for offences starting with ‘racially or religiously aggravated…’ and select all that appear.

As hate crime against individuals with learning disabilities is not specifically defined in legislation, we would not be able to distinguish whether or not a particular offence was related to a learning disability. For example, a relevant case could have the offence recorded simply as ‘common assault’. The level of detail required to answer this question may be held in court records, but to be able to identify these cases we would have to access and analyse individual court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

27th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when the Sentencing Council for England and Wales plans to publish its revised guidelines on sentencing for knife possession as a result of its consultation of 6 October 2016; and if she will make a statement.

Sentencing Guidelines are produced by the independent Sentencing Council for England and Wales.

A timetable for the Council’s upcoming work, including publication of definitive guidelines following consultation, can be found in an update to its Business Plan which is available on its website: www.sentencingcouncil.org.uk.

29th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many confiscation orders were issued in (a) 2012-13 and (b) 2013-14.

The table below shows the total number of confiscation orders issued for 2012/13 and 2013/14. It also shows the average value of confiscation orders made for drug related offences. The average value data is based on the ‘current’ order value and not the ‘original’ order value to ensure the data accurately captures amendments to the values following successful appeals or variations.

2012/2013

2013/2014

Total orders issued

6401

6033

Average value of orders issued (drug related offences)

£16,336.86

£16,490.30

Confiscation orders are one of the key mechanisms available to the Government to deprive criminals of the proceeds of their crimes. They are based on the notional benefit attributed to the crime and may therefore exceed the value of realisable assets that are known to the Court at the time of imposition. Crucially, an order that is outstanding stops the criminal benefitting from the proceeds of crime and ensures that, if assets are discovered in the future, they can be seized.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) and other agencies involved in confiscation order enforcement take the recovery of criminal assets very seriously and are working to ensure that clamping down on defaulters is a continued priority.

The amount defendants repaid from their criminal activity across all agencies has increased for the last five consecutive years and we are currently on course to have another highly effective year. £137.2million was collected in 2013/14 (which represented a 4% increase on the total recovered during 2012/13); as at the end of December 2014, £113 million had been recovered, which is an increase of 10% on the same period last year.

The majority of Confiscation Orders (52% by value) are enforced by agencies other than HM Courts & Tribunals Service. These agencies include the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Serious Fraud Office (SFO), Department for Work and Pensions and local authorities.

29th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average value was of a confiscation order for drug-related crimes in (a) 2012-13 and (b) 2013-14.

The table below shows the total number of confiscation orders issued for 2012/13 and 2013/14. It also shows the average value of confiscation orders made for drug related offences. The average value data is based on the ‘current’ order value and not the ‘original’ order value to ensure the data accurately captures amendments to the values following successful appeals or variations.

2012/2013

2013/2014

Total orders issued

6401

6033

Average value of orders issued (drug related offences)

£16,336.86

£16,490.30

Confiscation orders are one of the key mechanisms available to the Government to deprive criminals of the proceeds of their crimes. They are based on the notional benefit attributed to the crime and may therefore exceed the value of realisable assets that are known to the Court at the time of imposition. Crucially, an order that is outstanding stops the criminal benefitting from the proceeds of crime and ensures that, if assets are discovered in the future, they can be seized.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) and other agencies involved in confiscation order enforcement take the recovery of criminal assets very seriously and are working to ensure that clamping down on defaulters is a continued priority.

The amount defendants repaid from their criminal activity across all agencies has increased for the last five consecutive years and we are currently on course to have another highly effective year. £137.2million was collected in 2013/14 (which represented a 4% increase on the total recovered during 2012/13); as at the end of December 2014, £113 million had been recovered, which is an increase of 10% on the same period last year.

The majority of Confiscation Orders (52% by value) are enforced by agencies other than HM Courts & Tribunals Service. These agencies include the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Serious Fraud Office (SFO), Department for Work and Pensions and local authorities.

29th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many confiscation orders were issued for drug-related crimes in (a) 2012-13 and (b) 2013-14.

The table below shows the total number of confiscation orders issued for drug related offences in 2012/13 and 2013/14. It also shows the average amount recovered for drug related offences. The average value data is based on the ‘current’ order value and not the ‘original’ order value to ensure the data accurately captures amendments to the values following successful appeals or variations.

2012/2013

2013/2014

Total orders made (drug related offences)

3610

3537

Average amount recovered (drug related offences)

£10,165.73

£8,904.09

Confiscation orders are one of the key mechanisms available to the Government to deprive criminals of the proceeds of their crimes. They are based on the notional benefit attributed to the crime and may therefore exceed the value of realisable assets that are known to the Court at the time of imposition. Crucially, an order that is outstanding stops the criminal benefitting from the proceeds of crime and ensures that, if assets are discovered in the future, they can be seized.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) and other agencies involved in confiscation order enforcement take the recovery of criminal assets very seriously and are working to ensure that clamping down on defaulters is a continued priority.

The amount defendants repaid from their criminal activity across all agencies has increased for the last five consecutive years and we are currently on course to have another highly effective year. £137.2million was collected in 2013/14 (which represented a 4% increase on the total recovered during 2012/13); as at the end of December 2014, £113 million had been recovered, which is an increase of 10% on the same period last year.

The majority of Confiscation Orders (52% by value) are enforced by agencies other than HM Courts & Tribunals Service. These agencies include the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Serious Fraud Office (SFO), Department for Work and Pensions and local authorities.

29th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of offenders convicted in (a) 2012-13 and (b) 2013-14 were convicted for what drug-related crimes.

Under this Government crime is falling and criminals are more likely to go to prison and for longer. Drug offending is serious in itself, and drug dealers can expect substantial prison sentences, but drug abuse also underlies a huge volume of acquisitive and violent crime which can blight communities. The independent Sentencing Council issued a sentencing guideline on drug offences, effective from February 2012, which brought sentencing guidance together for the first time to help to ensure consistent and proportionate sentencing for all drug offences that come before courts.

The number of offenders found guilty at all courts of drug offences and of all drug-related offences, by quarter, in England and Wales from 2012 to 2013, can be viewed in the table below.

Offenders found guilty at all courts of drug offences, by quarter, England and Wales, 2012 to 2013 (1)(2)
Offence20122013
Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2Q3Q4
Importation and Exportation (3)
Number167135112129138101111108
Proportion of total offences0%0%0%0%0%0%0%0%
Production (4)
Number1,7891,6561,6401,6011,6311,6021,6221,454
Proportion of total offences1%1%1%1%1%1%1%1%
Supply (5)
Number1,0409168427601,050982922936
Proportion of total offences0%0%0%0%0%0%0%0%
Possession (6)
Number10,4919,33110,4579,5579,9259,8409,6469,108
Proportion of total offences3%3%3%3%3%3%3%3%
Possession with intent to supply (7)
Number1,8541,6821,6571,6591,6911,7741,8931,737
Proportion of total offences1%1%1%1%1%1%1%1%
Incitement to supply (8)
Number-2------
Proportion of total offences0%0%0%0%0%0%0%0%
Permitting premises to be used for illegal purposes (9)
Number135102120112127116127122
Proportion of total offences0%0%0%0%0%0%0%0%
Vienna Convention offences (10)
Number----2---
Proportion of total offences0%0%0%0%0%0%0%0%
Miscellaneous offences (11)
Number6739353841635662
Proportion of total offences0%0%0%0%0%0%0%0%
Total (drug offences)15,54313,86314,86313,85614,60514,47814,37713,527
Total (other offences)312,074282,920289,521288,946286,896276,833277,308273,944
Total (England and Wales)327,617296,783304,384302,802301,501291,311291,685287,471
Drug convictions (%)5%5%5%5%5%5%5%5%
'-' = Nil
(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.
(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
(3) Offences under SS 50(2),(3),(5), 68 (2) & (4) & 170 (1-4) of the Customs and Excise Management Act 1979
(4) Offences under Section 4(2) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971
(5) Offences under Section 4(3) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971
(6) Offences under Section 5(2) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971
(7) Offences under Section 5(3) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971
(8) Offences under Section 19 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971
(9) Offences under Section 8 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971
(10) Offences under SS12-19 of the Criminal Justice (International C-Operation) Act 1990 and RR6(5), 7, 7(5) & 8 of the Controlled Drug (Drug Precursors)(Community External Trade) Regulations 2008
(11) Offences under SS 9, 11(2), 12 (6), 13(3), 17 (4), 18 (2-4), 20 & 23 (4) of The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 & SS 327 - 330, 333, 336 (5) & (6) of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002
NB - 0% readings are due to rounding down from below 0.5%
Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.
Ref: PQ 222733

Whilst criminal justice statistics for England and Wales as a whole for the years 2012 and 2013 are in the public domain, statistics for the year 2014 are planned for publication on the Ministry of Justice website in May 2015. Please note that whilst quarterly court proceedings and convictions headline data are published on the Ministry of Justice website and are currently available up to end June 2014, these data are subject to revision as later quarters are published, and are finalised only when the annual publication is made publicly available. To ensure consistency of data released to users, further breakdowns (in this case by specific offences under certain legislation) of 2014 Quarter 1 (January to March) data are not available until the annual criminal statistics publication is published.

29th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many confiscation orders were issued for (a) £0-£1,000, (b) £1,001-£5,000, (c) £5,001-£10,000, (d) £10,001-£20,000, (e) £20,001-£50,000, (f) £50,001-£100,000, (g) £100,001-£500,000, (h) £500,001-£1 million, (i) £1 million-£5 million and (j) more than £5 million in (i) 2012-13 and (ii) 2013-14.

Confiscation orders are one of the key mechanisms available to the Government to deprive criminals of the proceeds of their crimes. They are based on the notional benefit attributed to the crime and may therefore exceed the value of realisable assets that are known to the Court at the time of imposition. Crucially, an order that is outstanding stops the criminal benefitting from the proceeds of crime and ensures that, if assets are discovered in the future, they can be seized.

The table below shows the total number of confiscation orders issued in 2012/13 and 2013/14 by value groups. It also shows the total number of drug related confiscation orders issued in 2012/13 and 2013/14 by value group.

Order value

2012/2013

2013/2014

Total orders made

Drug related offences

Total orders made

Drug related offences

£0 to £1,000

2833

1809

2690

1824

£1,001 to £5,000

1257

868

1205

844

£5,001 to £10,000

483

267

476

260

£10,001 to £20,000

505

225

538

226

£20,001 to £50,000

647

241

558

194

£50,001 to £100,000

267

81

258

94

£100,001 to £500,000

337

107

251

79

£500,001 to £999,999*

39

7

26

5

£1million to £5million

27

5

28

11

More than £5million

6

0

3

0

Total:

6401

3610

6033

3537

*figure amended from £500,001 to £999,999 (other than £1m as requested in question) to avoid the double counting of orders as number ranges overlapped.

The total amount defendants repaid from their criminal activity across all agencies has increased for the last five consecutive years and we are currently on course to have another highly effective year. £137.2million was collected in 2013/14; as at the end of December 2014, £113 million had been recovered, which is an increase of 10% on the same period last year.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) and other agencies involved in confiscation order enforcement take the recovery of criminal assets very seriously and are working to ensure that clamping down on defaulters is a continued priority.

29th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many drug-related confiscation orders were issued for (a) £0 to £1,000, (b) £1,001 to £5,000, (c) £5,001 to £10,000, (d) £10,001 to £20,000, (e) £20,001 to £50,000, (f) £50,001 to £100,000, (g) £100,001 to £500,000, (h) £500,001 to £1 million, (i) £1 million to £5 million and (j) more than £5 million in (i) 2012-13 and (ii) 2013-14.

Confiscation orders are one of the key mechanisms available to the Government to deprive criminals of the proceeds of their crimes. They are based on the notional benefit attributed to the crime and may therefore exceed the value of realisable assets that are known to the Court at the time of imposition. Crucially, an order that is outstanding stops the criminal benefitting from the proceeds of crime and ensures that, if assets are discovered in the future, they can be seized.

The table below shows the total number of confiscation orders issued in 2012/13 and 2013/14 by value groups. It also shows the total number of drug related confiscation orders issued in 2012/13 and 2013/14 by value group.

Order value

2012/2013

2013/2014

Total orders made

Drug related offences

Total orders made

Drug related offences

£0 to £1,000

2833

1809

2690

1824

£1,001 to £5,000

1257

868

1205

844

£5,001 to £10,000

483

267

476

260

£10,001 to £20,000

505

225

538

226

£20,001 to £50,000

647

241

558

194

£50,001 to £100,000

267

81

258

94

£100,001 to £500,000

337

107

251

79

£500,001 to £999,999*

39

7

26

5

£1million to £5million

27

5

28

11

More than £5million

6

0

3

0

Total:

6401

3610

6033

3537

*figure amended from £500,001 to £999,999 (other than £1m as requested in question) to avoid the double counting of orders as number ranges overlapped.

The total amount defendants repaid from their criminal activity across all agencies has increased for the last five consecutive years and we are currently on course to have another highly effective year. £137.2million was collected in 2013/14; as at the end of December 2014, £113 million had been recovered, which is an increase of 10% on the same period last year.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) and other agencies involved in confiscation order enforcement take the recovery of criminal assets very seriously and are working to ensure that clamping down on defaulters is a continued priority.

21st Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the total value of fines was (a) issued by the courts and (b) collected in 2013-14 in each local criminal justice board area.

This Government takes recovery and enforcement of financial impositions very seriously and remains committed to finding new ways to ensure impositions are paid and to trace those who do not pay. This is why there has been a year on year increase in the total amount of financial penalties collected over the last three years. The amount of money collected reached an all time high of £290 million at the end of 2013/14 and collections continue to rise. In 2013/14 the total outstanding balance of financial impositions reduced by £26.7m (5%) in the year.

The table below shows the value of financial impositions ordered by the courts in 2013/14, and the total value of financial impositions collected in the year.

Area

Impositions 2013/14

Collected Against Impositions in year

Total collected in the year - regardless of imposition date

Avon and Somerset

£10,488,481

£3,816,902

£7,172,942

Bedfordshire

£4,225,416

£1,859,237

£3,202,616

Cambridgeshire

£4,890,202

£1,933,970

£3,547,387

Cheshire

£7,518,203

£3,839,030

£6,066,620

Cleveland

£3,994,238

£1,275,769

£2,882,318

Cumbria

£4,381,676

£1,500,696

£2,790,743

Derbyshire

£4,619,046

£1,802,742

£3,453,856

Devon and Cornwall

£7,275,905

£3,492,226

£6,154,292

Dorset

£4,254,020

£1,592,455

£3,388,107

Durham

£3,100,039

£1,169,332

£2,473,197

Dyfed Powys

£3,774,386

£1,743,944

£2,898,590

Essex

£10,989,916

£5,222,015

£8,443,356

Gloucestershire

£2,145,012

£894,327

£1,840,466

Greater Manchester

£22,329,688

£7,039,630

£15,250,585

Gwent

£4,788,550

£1,762,976

£3,527,232

Hampshire & IOW

£11,013,958

£4,079,985

£8,459,808

Hertfordshire

£9,563,529

£3,829,326

£6,440,952

Humberside

£7,136,166

£2,837,722

£5,694,120

Kent

£11,982,516

£4,191,673

£8,362,118

Lancashire

£13,146,146

£4,475,514

£7,798,619

Leicestershire

£6,044,190

£2,577,867

£4,320,886

Lincolnshire

£6,141,834

£2,706,212

£4,210,021

London Central & South East

£37,479,069

£12,591,694

£21,055,254

London North East

£19,420,646

£5,919,447

£10,646,490

London North West

£23,238,619

£8,598,442

£14,243,408

London South West

£1,627,698

£903,715

£3,659,537

Merseyside

£12,266,671

£3,901,058

£9,556,566

Norfolk

£4,810,313

£1,825,238

£3,307,277

North Wales

£5,476,857

£2,476,682

£4,264,771

North Yorkshire

£4,247,146

£2,168,730

£3,489,709

Northamptonshire

£4,046,826

£1,391,365

£2,909,235

Northumbria

£10,806,079

£3,613,008

£7,385,384

Nottinghamshire

£8,409,069

£3,050,949

£5,254,473

South Wales

£16,335,911

£6,584,635

£10,762,439

South Yorkshire

£9,955,309

£2,808,251

£5,752,104

Staffordshire

£8,075,539

£2,824,654

£6,008,493

Suffolk

£4,945,931

£1,887,068

£3,309,711

Surrey

£7,833,947

£4,298,880

£6,331,557

Sussex

£7,295,943

£3,024,765

£5,986,262

Thames Valley

£13,975,694

£6,347,357

£10,957,532

Warwickshire

£5,478,730

£1,967,666

£3,137,619

West Mercia

£9,034,521

£3,169,955

£5,749,674

West Midlands

£18,824,807

£5,980,168

£14,196,420

West Yorkshire

£19,708,027

£6,593,972

£11,421,315

Wiltshire

£3,159,373

£1,163,257

£2,547,769

Total

£420,255,840

£156,734,504

£290,311,831

These figures include fines, compensation orders, victim surcharge orders and prosecution costs orders. The value of the impositions that remain outstanding at the end of the year includes accounts that were not due to be paid by the end of the period specified (either because they were imposed close to the end of the year or because they had payment timescales set by the courts for beyond the end of the financial year) and those that were being paid by instalments on agreed payment plans.

15th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what types of offence resulted in confiscation orders being made in 2012-13; and how much was collected as a result of those orders.

The table below shows the primary offence type for all confiscation orders made between 01/04/2012 and 31/03/2013 and the current amount paid against those impositions as of 16/01/2015. The ‘Amount Paid’ does not include any sums of interest that may have been collected on those orders.

Primary Offence Type

Amount Paid

Arms Trafficking

£ 2,274.00

Bribery and Corruption

£ 724.00

Burglary / Theft

£ 5,178,518.99

Counterfeiting / Intellectual Property / Forgery

£ 3,482,693.99

Drug Trafficking

£ 27,142,467.06

Excise Duty Fraud

£ 1,250,612.62

Handling Stolen Goods

£ 778,521.81

Intellectual Property Crime

£ 390,863.43

Money Laundering - Drugs

£ 8,183,885.75

Money Laundering - Other

£ 18,291,592.71

Other Crime

£ 8,045,149.97

Other Fraud / Embezzlement / Deception / Crimes of dishonesty

£ 22,650,449.84

People Trafficking

£ 281,589.31

Pimps and Brothels / Prostitution / Pornography

£ 965,260.92

Robbery

£ 167,503.53

Tax and Benefit Fraud

£ 9,078,615.86

Terrorism

£ 39,945.15

Trading Standards Offences

£ 435,591.73

Unknown

£ 125,986.91

VAT Fraud

£ 10,548,046.91

Vehicle Offences

£ 917,892.02

Grand Total

£ 117,958,186.51

Confiscation orders are one of the key mechanisms available to the Government to deprive criminals of the proceeds of their crimes. They are based on the notional benefit attributed to the crime and may, therefore, exceed the value of realisable assets that are known to the Court at the time of imposition. Crucially, an order that is outstanding stops the criminal benefitting from the proceeds of crime and ensures that, if assets are discovered in the future, they can be seized.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) and other agencies involved in confiscation order enforcement take the recovery of criminal assets very seriously and are working to ensure that clamping down on defaulters is a continued priority.

The amount defendants repaid from their criminal activity across all agencies has increased for the last five consecutive years and we are currently on course to have another highly effective year. £137.2million was collected in 2013/14 (which represented a 4% increase on the total recovered during 2012/13); as at the end of December 2014, £113 million had been recovered, which is an increase of 10% on the same period last year.

30th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the total value was of fines (a) issued by the courts and (b) collected was in financial year 2013-14.

This Government takes recovery and enforcement of financial impositions very seriously and remains committed to finding new ways to ensure impositions are paid and to trace those who do not pay. This is why there has been a year on year increase in the amount of financial penalties collected over the last three years, reaching a record high in 2013-14.

HMCTS are actively seeking an external provider for the future delivery of compliance and enforcement services. This will bring the investment and innovation to significantly improve the collection of criminal financial penalties and reduce the cost of the service to the taxpayer.

The total value of fines (a) issued by the courts and (b) collected in the financial year 2013-14 is set out below.

Financial Year

Amount imposed

Amount collected

2013-14

£420,255,840

£290,311,831

The total amount collected in the financial year 2013-14 was a record high and was £5.8 million higher than the previous financial year.

The amounts above include all elements of financial impositions (excluding confiscation orders): fines, costs, compensation and victim surcharge. The amounts collected in a particular year can relate to impositions from that year or any previous year. The amounts include those that were being paid by instalments or were not due for payment by the end of the year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his Department's 10 largest contracts let since the financial year 2010-11 are; what savings have been made in such contracts; what the level of overspend or underspend was in each such contract; and what steps his Department has taken to monitor the performance of each supplier of such contract following the contract award.

The Ministry of Justice has taken a number of steps to improve commercial capability across the department. We regularly review suppliers' performance against key performance indicators and have recently embarked on a programme aimed at introducing a more robust approach to contract management, to ensure that contracts deliver best possible value for the taxpayer.

The table below features the ten largest contracts let by the Ministry of Justice since the financial year 2010/11, and provides details of savings and of any under- or overspend in each financial year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

Temporary staff can provide a fast, flexible and efficient way to obtain necessary skills that are not available inhouse. They are only used for short term appointments where there is a strong business case, such as support for Transforming Rehabilitation and other major reform programmes within the MoJ.

The Ministry of Justice has spent the following on the provision of service with (a) Capita, (b) Brook Street, (c) Hays PLC (d) Groupe Steria and (e) Certes Holdings in the Financial Year 2013/14. Spend is exclusive of VAT.

Supplier

Financial Year 2013/14

Capita

£26,411,523.67

Brook Street

£24,514,489.19

Hays PLC

£16,548,878.53

Groupe Steria

£3,000,763.31

Certes Holdings

£712,948.27

The approval process on expenditure has been tightened in recent years. All requirements over £20,000 must have departmental approval from the Director General of Finance.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many overseas trips, and at what total cost, his Department made in each year since 2010; and what the costs of (a) flights, (b) internal travel, (c) hotel accommodation and (d) subsistence were of each trip.

The Ministry of Justice has reduced the overall cost of air travel by almost half since 2009, and our total spend on all travel has fallen by more than 40 per cent in the same period – a saving of more than £9m.

Furthermore, this year, the Justice Secretary toughened up the rules to ban first and business class travel for Ministers and officials in the department other than in exceptional circumstances where this is required to meet business need.

Overseas travel makes up a small proportion of the Department's overall travel requirement. Flights and travel by Eurostar are booked through our contracted supplier, and whilst the MoJ records data on transactions, it does not hold details of the cost or destination of individual trips centrally. The cost of breaking down all travel in the ways requested would be disproportionate, as managers across the Department would have to create a breakdown of every trip taken, itemised by the different kinds of expenditure.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The Ministry of Justice can provide spend for the provision of services with the top ten consultancy firms for 11 months of the last financial year (13/14) as March 2014 spend is not yet available. All spend is exclusive of VAT. The below table shows the top ten suppliers for consultancy for 2013/2014 and spend.

Consultants can provide a fast, flexible and efficient way to obtain necessary skills that are not available inhouse. Consultancy spend is governed by strict Cabinet Office controls and any spend over £20k requires approval by the departmental board on behalf of the Secretaryof State.Consultancy contracts in excess of nine months require further approval by the Cabinet Office.

Supplier

2013/2014 YTD

1

PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS

£8,617,495.63

2

ERNST & YOUNG GLOBAL LIMITED

£5,870,242.50

3

PA CONSULTING GROUP LIMITED

£3,200,003.90

4

MCKINSEY & CO INC. UNITED KINGDOM

£2,596,675.00

5

ALLEN & OVERY LLP

£765,883.60

6

CAPGEMINI S.A.

£723,189.07

7

METHODS CONSULTING LTD

£364,726.69

8

BIRD & BIRD

£312,387.78

9

PINSENT MASONS

£161,134.37

10

REGENCY IT CONSULTING

£116,805.00

12th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what his policy is on maintaining the Common Travel Area border between the UK and the Republic of Ireland following the UK leaving the EU; and if he will make a statement.

There is a strong will to preserve the Common Travel Area. The UK Government, the Northern Ireland Executive and the Irish Government have been unequivocal – all want to maintain the current arrangements and avoid the introduction of physical border controls within the CTA.

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for her Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

My Department used four companies to provide temporary workers during the 13/14 financial year; their names and the amounts paid to them for the provision of temporary staff are listed below:

G4S - £236,685

Premier People - £63,513

Hays - £22,742

Networkers International - £5,189

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by her Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

During 2013-14, my Department only used one consultancy firm, PricewaterhouseCoopers, who were paid £1,620.

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

In the last financial year the Scotland Office did not engage or pay any money to any consultancy firm.

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The Scotland Office used two companies to provide temporary workers in the last financial year. Temporary workers in Edinburgh were employed from Pertemps Recruitment Partnership Ltd at a total cost of £37,639.21; in London, temporary workers were employed from Eclipse Recruitment Ltd at a total cost of £40,214.17.

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, which 10 consultancy firms were paid the most by his Department in the last financial year; and how much each of those firms was paid.

The Wales Office did not employ any consultants in 2013-14.

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, which five companies were used most often to provide temporary workers for his Department in the last financial year; and how much in agency fees was paid to each of them.

The information requested is as follows, for financial year 2013-14:

Brook Street

£3,929

Ellwood Atfield

£3,054