Paul Blomfield Portrait

Paul Blomfield

Labour - Sheffield Central

First elected: 6th May 2010


Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform Bill)
2nd Nov 2022 - 29th Nov 2022
Carer’s Leave Bill
2nd Nov 2022 - 9th Nov 2022
Neonatal Care (Leave and Pay) Bill
20th Jul 2022 - 7th Sep 2022
Nationality and Borders Bill
16th Sep 2021 - 4th Nov 2021
Shadow Minister (International Trade) (Brexit and EU Negotiations)
10th Apr 2020 - 30th Dec 2020
Shadow Minister (Cabinet Office) (Brexit and EU Negotiations)
10th Apr 2020 - 30th Dec 2020
Shadow Minister (Exiting the European Union)
9th Oct 2016 - 10th Apr 2020
Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee
17th Oct 2016 - 31st Oct 2016
Education, Skills and the Economy Sub-Committee
1st Dec 2015 - 31st Oct 2016
Business and Trade Committee
17th Oct 2016 - 31st Oct 2016
Business, Innovation and Skills Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 17th Oct 2016
Business, Innovation and Skills Committee
2nd Nov 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Able Marine Energy Park Development Consent Order 2014
17th Jun 2014 - 30th Oct 2014
Able Marine Energy Park Development Consent Order 2014
11th Jun 2014 - 30th Oct 2014


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Paul Blomfield has voted in 768 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Paul Blomfield Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Tom Pursglove (Conservative)
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
(43 debate interactions)
Michael Gove (Conservative)
Minister for Intergovernmental Relations
(28 debate interactions)
Robert Jenrick (Conservative)
(18 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(95 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(60 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(36 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(36 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Paul Blomfield's debates

Sheffield Central Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We believe kids shouldn't learn about this at an early age. I am sure there are many parents who do not want their or other children taught about LGBT in primary school.

We believe kids should learn about this at an early age. I am sure there are many parents who want their and other children taught about LGBT issues in primary school.

We want the Government to abandon the planned implementation of affordability checks for some people who want to place a bet. We believe such checks – which could include assessing whether people are ‘at risk of harm' based on their postcode or job title – are inappropriate and discriminatory.

The Government should require that student nurses be paid while on placement as part of their training. This should be at least the minimum wage for apprentices.

Most NHS midwifery, nursing and paramedic programmes are full-time courses running 46 weeks of the year. They are hard work and students play a vital role. However, students are not classed as workers, and are therefore not entitled to the 30 hours of free childcare available to working parents.

Pay healthcare students at least minimum wage for placement hours. It cost each student a minimum of £17 per shift in fuel. £186 in tuition and lost earnings. Some students pay £170 on fuel alone each week for 37.5 hours of work.

No general statutory duty of care exists in HE. Yet, a duty of care is owed to students, and the Government should legislate for this. HE providers should know what their duty is. Students must know what they can expect. Parents expect their children to be safe at university.

The Government should bring forward legislation to allow assisted dying for adults who are terminally ill and have mental capacity. It should be permitted subject to strict upfront safeguards, assessed by two doctors independently, and self-administered by the dying person.

I would like the UK Government to make it law that nightclubs must search guests on arrival to prevent harmful weapons and other items entering the establishment. This could be a pat down search or metal detector, but must involve measures being put in place to ensure the safety of the public.

The UK's departure from the EU looms but questions remain about the legitimacy of the Referendum. The Electoral Commission said illegal overspending occurred during the Referendum. Were the vote/any subsequent political acts affected? Article 50 was triggered. Was the overspend known about then?

There is now strong evidence of serious misconduct during the 2016 EU Referendum, including intereference by foreign actors and governments. This must be investigated under the Inquiries Act (2005).

The government should consider delaying negotiations so they can concentrate on the coronavirus situation and reduce travel of both EU and UK negotiators. This would necessitate extending the transition period; as there can only be a one off extension, this should be for two years.


Latest EDMs signed by Paul Blomfield

21st March 2024
Paul Blomfield signed this EDM on Wednesday 27th March 2024

Teachers’ Pension Scheme and universities

Tabled by: Mary Kelly Foy (Labour - City of Durham)
That this House notes that employers’ contributions to the Teachers’ Pension Scheme (TPS), of which approximately 58,000 university staff are members, are soon to increase by 5% in England and Wales; further notes, with concern, that while schools and colleges will receive additional funding from the Department for Education (DfE) …
20 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 15
Independent: 2
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
11th January 2024
Paul Blomfield signed this EDM on Thursday 21st March 2024

Hosting refugees and asylum seekers: Council Tax Single Person Discount

Tabled by: Mike Penning (Conservative - Hemel Hempstead)
That this House calls on the Government to amend the Council Tax (Additional Provisions for Discount Disregards) Regulations 1992, so that refugees and asylum seekers with leave to remain being hosted in their home by a person living alone are disregarded for the Council Tax Single Person Discount; and notes …
12 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 4
Conservative: 3
Liberal Democrat: 2
Alba Party: 1
Independent: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Paul Blomfield's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Paul Blomfield, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Paul Blomfield has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Paul Blomfield

Monday 21st March 2022

1 Bill introduced by Paul Blomfield


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for regulating high-cost credit arrangements and providers of such arrangements; to provide for controls on advertising, information and communications associated with such arrangements; to make measures to address the cost and affordability of such credit arrangements and their associated charges; to regulate matters concerning repayments under such arrangements; to make provision on advice and advice services in relation to debt arising from such arrangements; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 12th July 2013

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Answer of 30 July 2021 to Question 35830 on Coronavirus: Death, if he will publish figures on the proportion of NHS staff who have died from covid-19 since March 2020 in each ethnic group for which figures are available.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the hon. Member’s Parliamentary Question of 15 June is attached.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what data his Department holds on potential climate-related migration to the UK as a result of global climate change.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

11th Feb 2021
What discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on support for manufacturers that are subject to non-tariff barriers to trade with the EU.

As has been the case under successive administrations, details of internal discussions are not usually disclosed.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent steps he has taken to simplify trading arrangements between the UK and the EU.

I refer the Hon Members to the answers given in Cabinet Office orals on 11 February. Guidance and published information are available on gov.uk.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his oral statement on 13 July 2020, Official Report, column 1271, on what date was that legal advice presented to his Department.

In keeping with long-standing convention and practice, details of legal advice are not disclosed.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that the UK-EU future relationship does not introduce delays to the movement of goods and people in relation to the (a) supply of medicines and (b) maintenance of vital machinery and equipment in the event of a future pandemic after the end of the transition period.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK remains a global leader in life sciences and continues to collaborate with European and other countries on scientific research. At the end of the UK transition period, clinical trials will continue to be approved at a national level, working to international standards as they are now. The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) along with partners in the UK healthcare system, has taken steps to ensure that all trials, including multinational trials, can continue. The UK is collaborating extensively with international partners in the research effort against COVID-19 and we will continue to do so after the end of the UK transition period.

The UK’s approach to the future relationship negotiations sets out our ambition to reach an agreement that would facilitate trade in medicinal products. However, any responsible Government has a duty to prepare for all scenarios and have robust contingency plans in place. We continue to hold stockpiles to cope with a range of scenarios.

We are doing everything we can to ensure our health and social care staff have the equipment they need to tackle Covid-19 virus. Sourcing sufficient PPE is an international challenge and we are working with many international partners, including the EU. In terms of ventilators, as a result of the Ventilator Challenge the NHS has significantly increased supply.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that the UK-EU future relationship enables UK participation in EU-funded multinational (a) clinical trials and (b) research collaborations on (i) covid-19 treatments and (ii) other medicines after the end of the transition period.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK remains a global leader in life sciences and continues to collaborate with European and other countries on scientific research. At the end of the UK transition period, clinical trials will continue to be approved at a national level, working to international standards as they are now. The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) along with partners in the UK healthcare system, has taken steps to ensure that all trials, including multinational trials, can continue. The UK is collaborating extensively with international partners in the research effort against COVID-19 and we will continue to do so after the end of the UK transition period.

The UK’s approach to the future relationship negotiations sets out our ambition to reach an agreement that would facilitate trade in medicinal products. However, any responsible Government has a duty to prepare for all scenarios and have robust contingency plans in place. We continue to hold stockpiles to cope with a range of scenarios.

We are doing everything we can to ensure our health and social care staff have the equipment they need to tackle Covid-19 virus. Sourcing sufficient PPE is an international challenge and we are working with many international partners, including the EU. In terms of ventilators, as a result of the Ventilator Challenge the NHS has significantly increased supply.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 9 June 2020 to Question 55054, what indicators his Department plans to use to determine whether to lift covid-19 lockdown restrictions on marriages.

As set out in ‘Our Plan to Rebuild’, any adjustments to current social distancing controls for England will be timed carefully according to both the current transmission rate of the virus and the Government’s ability to ensure safety. The steps for modifying social distancing measures are set out in the plan, with strict conditions to safely move from each step to the next.

In the strategy, we committed to exploring how to enable people to gather in slightly larger groups to better facilitate small weddings. We are actively looking at how we can facilitate small weddings, as soon as possible, to deliver the roadmap.

Step Three of the plan also includes the ambition to open at least some places of worship, including the potential for some small wedding ceremonies. The Government’s current planning assumption is that this step will be no earlier than 4 July, subject to the five tests for easing measures and further detailed scientific advice provided closer to the time, on how far we can go.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of economically inactive people in the UK are classified as (a) students, (b) unable to work due to sickness, (c) looking after homes, (d) caring for family members and (d) retired.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Cabinet Office, what assessment she has made of the reason that people who are economically inactive and are not (a) students, (b) unable to work due to sickness, (c) looking after homes or caring for family members and (b) retired are not actively looking for work.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

10th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what assessment has she made of the potential impact of the European Commission anti-subsidy investigation into electric vehicle imports from China on the UK electric vehicle sector.

On the 4th of October the European Commission initiated an anti-subsidy investigation into imports of new battery electric vehicles from China. Officials will continue monitoring developments around the investigation and will assess its implications for the UK as more information is publicly available.

The automotive industry is a vital part of our economy, and the Government is determined to ensure that the UK remains one of the best locations in the world for automotive manufacturing and continue to support industry through its longstanding programmes.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
21st Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department offered support to Royal Mail to help resolve the ransomware attack on 10 January 2023; and whether her Department had discussions with Royal Mail on (a) compensation for sub-postmasters who lost trade arising from the ransomware attack and (b) sustaining sub-postmasters income as they offer more services online.

The cyber incident affecting Royal Mail is an operational matter for the business to address. Royal Mail has been working with the National Cyber Security Centre and law enforcement partners to resolve the incident.

The Department has had no discussions with Royal Mail on compensation for sub-postmasters or sustaining sub-postmasters’ income. These are contractual matters for the two businesses.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
21st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent assessment she has made of the potential impact of the Offshore Petroleum Licensing Bill on the global biodiversity framework.

The UK is committed to implementing the Kunming Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework which aims to halt and reverse global biodiversity loss and contains a target to protect at least 30% of the world’s land and ocean by 2030.

The UK has a comprehensive legal framework of environmental protection measures for offshore oil and gas activities. Section 12 of the Impact Assessment published alongside the Offshore Petroleum Licensing Bill sets out how the environmental principles of the Environment Act have been considered in the development of this Bill.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
19th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent assessment she has made of the potential impact of the Government's target of protecting 30% of UK waters for nature by 2030 on her Department's criteria for oil and gas development permissions.

A comprehensive framework of environmental protection measures has been developed in the UK to minimise the impact of offshore oil and gas activities and this is embodied in the relevant legislation. Development proposals for oil and gas are a matter for the relevant regulators - the North Sea Transition Authority (NSTA) and the Offshore Petroleum Regulator for Environment and Decommissioning (OPRED). As part of the regulatory process, OPRED considers the Environmental Impact Assessment for development proposals to ensure that the impact on the environment, including marine protected areas and relevant targets is taken into account.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps she is taking to encourage companies to offer under floor insulation installation under the Great British Insulation Scheme.

The Government sets the overall target and scheme rules, including which measures are eligible for the delivery of the Great British Insulation Scheme but does not direct which insulation measures are installed; that is left to the obligated energy suppliers and their installers to determine.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
27th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, if she will take steps to (a) expand the Government's support for the Horizon Europe pump priming collaboration and (b) end the rule that research applications to Horizon Europe must identify a call and topic in Pillar 2.

The British Academy has received considerable interest in the Pump Priming grants scheme, and the Government is pleased with the level of engagement, including from those new to the programme. There are no plans to expand the recently launched pump priming grants.

Applications for Horizon Europe grants are made directly to the European Commission. All calls within Horizon Europe work programme 2024 and beyond are funded by the UK’s association to Horizon Europe.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
7th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what steps she is taking to support postgraduate researchers with increases in the cost of living.

The Government recognises that postgraduate researchers (PGRs) are vital to the UK’s science and technology superpower ambitions.

The Government has funded UKRI to significantly increase the minimum stipend level for PGRs by nearly 20% in cash terms over two years (rising to £18,622 pa for the 2023/24 academic year), to help them with the current cost-of living. Around 20% of PGRs receive UKRI stipends, which are generally tax-free.

This financial support is part of the Government’s long-term work on reaching a New Deal for PGRs, to make the UK the best place for PGRs.

7th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what steps her Department is taking to encourage students from disadvantaged backgrounds to complete postgraduate research.

The Government continues to provide targeted funding to increase the accessibility of postgraduate research (PGR) to students from disadvantaged backgrounds and is committed to creating a New Deal of support for PGR students.

In 2022, the Office for Students and Research England announced funding for 13 projects to tackle persistent inequalities and barriers for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic students to access PGR. In 2023, UKRI published results of a Call for Input on a PGR New Deal and will respond later this year.

The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology continues to work with UKRI and the Department for Education to consider further steps to support access to and widen participation in PGR.

29th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether the Office for National Statistics includes Higher Education Innovation Funding in its estimate of total UK Research and Development spending.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is an independent producer of official statistics.

Its annual publication “Research and development expenditure by the UK government” has figures for UK Government net expenditure on research and development (R&D) by department and for UK Government net expenditure on knowledge transfer by department, both separately and combined; it has also published experimental statistics on “UK public-funded gross regional capital and non-capital expenditure on research and development”.

I understand that UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) provides ONS with expenditure data on Higher Education Innovation Funding to be included in these statistics.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the (a) Scoping Group and (b) Sounding Board to the review of the research, development and innovation landscape will approve the recommendations of the Review.

In leading his independent Review of the Research, Development and Innovation Organisational Landscape, Sir Paul Nurse has gathered input from members of the Review’s Scoping Group and Sounding Board, alongside hundreds of organisations in the UK’s RDI landscape. Work is underway to consider and finalise the Review’s recommendations, which will consider input from those group members, ahead of the Review’s publication in the coming months.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the independent review of the research, development and innovation landscape.

In leading his independent Review of the Research, Development and Innovation Organisational Landscape, Sir Paul Nurse has gathered input from members of the Review’s Scoping Group and Sounding Board, alongside hundreds of organisations in the UK’s RDI landscape. Work is underway to consider and finalise the Review’s recommendations, which will consider input from those group members, ahead of the Review’s publication in the coming months.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of reducing the maximum noise levels of fireworks.

There is a comprehensive regulatory framework already in place for fireworks that the Government believes strikes the right balance for people to enjoy fireworks, whilst aiming to reduce risks and disturbances to both people and animals. This includes existing legislation setting the noise level of fireworks available to consumers to a maximum of 120 decibels.

We continue to use evidence to inform our work on fireworks. Earlier this year, we published research conducted by Ipsos Mori that provided evidence on consumer attitudes towards and behaviours around using fireworks in the UK. The report found that only around a third of people supported banning the sale of fireworks to the public for use in private displays.

15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the impact on (a) residential communities and (b) the environment of 120-decibel fireworks.

There is a comprehensive regulatory framework already in place for fireworks that the Government believes strikes the right balance for people to enjoy fireworks, whilst aiming to reduce risks and disturbances to both people and animals. This includes existing legislation setting the noise level of fireworks available to consumers to a maximum of 120 decibels.

We continue to use evidence to inform our work on fireworks. Earlier this year, we published research conducted by Ipsos Mori that provided evidence on consumer attitudes towards and behaviours around using fireworks in the UK. The report found that only around a third of people supported banning the sale of fireworks to the public for use in private displays.

10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support jobs at the Rolls Royce Advanced Blade Casting Facility at the Advanced Manufacturing Park.

The Government’s extensive business support measures such as job retention CBILs, and Bounce Back loans have helped companies protect work and jobs in the UK. The aerospace industry and its aviation customers are being supported with around £11bn made available through loan guarantees, support for exporters, the Covid Corporate Financing Facility, and grants for research and development.

Rolls-Royce has made clear that the restructuring reflects the change in medium-term market conditions which have been impacted by the global COVID19 pandemic and is about the survival of the company and securing its long-term, sustainable future.

Rolls-Royce has reopened a voluntary severance scheme and has offered impacted staff job opportunities at alternative sites in the area. If necessary, the Government will work with Rolls-Royce to make sure that those who lose their jobs are supported, and to help them get back into alternative employment as quickly as possible, particularly through the services of DWP and Job Centre Plus.

13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business. Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the (a) effect of new visa arrangements on the ability of self-employed people to conduct business in the EU and (b) estimated cost of such requirements to the self-employed working in the EU in 2021.

While freedom of movement between the UK and the EU has ended, the UK-EU Trade & Co-operation Agreement (TCA) contains provisions on the entry and temporary stay of natural persons for business purposes (Mode IV). This includes self-employed professionals.

The TCA ensures that both parties offer a minimum standard of treatment for this type of professional, such as guaranteed lengths of stay of up to 12 months (subject to Member State reservations), and transparency and procedural facilitation measures where visas or work permits are required by a destination country.

The TCA also guarantees market access to key economic sectors (subject to Member State reservations), including for the self-employed, and eases some burdens on business travellers, such as: removing the need for work permits for some short-term business activities, and reducing the number of economic needs tests a country could impose to block access to exporters.

Taken together, these measures will help self-employed professionals to continue providing services in the EU and the UK. Requirements for visas and work permits, including costs, vary depending on Member State, and on the activity being performed. Those looking to work in the EU should check with their host state’s entry and stay requirements before travelling.

13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of new immigration rules for UK nationals seeking seasonal work outside tourism in the EU.

Seasonal work is not a category normally featured in free trade agreements. However, temporary work routes were negotiated in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA), as featured in the chapter on entry and temporary stay. These include: short-term business visitors; intra-company transferees; and those providing services under contract, whether as an employee or a self-employed professional.

The contractual service suppliers and independent (self-employed) professionals categories are most likely to offer appropriate routes to seasonal workers. The TCA ensures both the UK and the EU offer length of stays of up to 12 months (with a limited number of exceptions in some Member States) and guarantees market access for a range of economic sectors, subject to qualification requirements and Member State reservations. Specifically, our agreement with the EU includes sectoral coverage for contractual services suppliers who provide tourist guides services, and travel agency and tour operator services. This mirrors commitments taken by the UK in our recent trade deal with Japan.

The TCA also eases some burdens on business travellers, such as: removing the need for work permits for some short-term trips, and reducing the number of economic needs tests a country could impose to block access to exporters, which will also help seasonal workers.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many staff the Employment Agencies Standards Inspectorate (a) employed in 2019-20 and (b) employs in 2020-21; and how many of those staff were dedicated to working in Scotland in each of those years.

The Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate had 28 staff in post on 31st March 2020 and 22 on 31st December 2020. A recruitment campaign is currently being undertaken to fill the vacant positions. Staff are not allocated to a dedicated location and will deal with casework that covers all of Great Britain.

4th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish a list of UK-recognised approved bodies that can carry out conformity assessments for UKCA-marked goods after the transition period.

The Department published a list of UK approved bodies on 8 December 2020 on the UK Market Conformity Assessment Bodies database (UKMCAB) which can be accessed at https://www.gov.uk/uk-market-conformity-assessment-bodies.

The bodies on this list are the same bodies who already provide conformity assessment services now. This has been previously communicated to industry to help them make plans for the new regulatory regime.

7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish his proposals on a state aid regime to be implemented after the end of the transition period.

On 9th September 2020, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State made a Written Ministerial Statement on the future plans for subsidy control. This can be found here.

12th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment her Department has made of the effectiveness of self-regulation by the sporting industry in reducing the quantity of gambling messaging seen by viewers.

In our approach to gambling advertising, we have struck a balanced and evidence-led approach which tackles aggressive advertising that is most likely to appeal to children, while recognising that advertising is an entirely legitimate commercial practice for responsible gambling firms.

We have welcomed the industry's whistle-to-whistle ban on TV betting adverts during live sports programmes. According to figures from the Betting and Gaming Council, the ban reduced the quantity of gambling advertisement views by children (age 4-17) by 70% over the full duration of live sporting programmes.

Further, alongside the Premier League’s announcement that it will ban gambling sponsors from the front of shirts by the end of the 2025/26 season, the gambling white paper commitment for a cross-sport Code of Conduct for gambling sponsorship has now been agreed by a number of the country’s major sports governing bodies. This will guarantee that where gambling sponsorship does appear, it is done in a responsible way to ensure fans, especially children, are better protected. This code will include provisions to ensure replica shirts for both children and adults are available without front-of-shirt gambling logos and a proportion of in-stadia advertising is dedicated to safer gambling messaging.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the guidance on Loot boxes in video games: update on improvements to industry-led protections, published by her Department on 18 July 2023, what steps she is taking to review the impact of these measures on protecting people from gambling harm.

Following the Government response to the call for evidence on loot boxes in video games, the Government has welcomed new industry-led guidance that aims to protect young people from gambling harm.

Measures to protect young people should ensure that the purchase of loot boxes should be unavailable to all children and young people unless enabled by a parent or guardian, and all players should have access to, and be aware of, spending controls and transparent information to support safe and responsible gameplay.

DCMS has published a Video Games Research Framework to support high quality independent research into video games, building understanding of the impact of video games, including loot boxes.

In parallel to the framework, we are now working closely with academics to ensure specific and robust evaluation of the implementation and efficacy of the new industry-led measures on loot boxes in meeting the government’s objectives. We will provide an update following a 12-month implementation period.

5th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what plans her Department has to (a) investigate and (b) regulate (i) crypto-casinos and (ii) other new and emerging forms of gambling.

All providers of betting and gambling services in the UK must be approved and licenced by the Gambling Commission. Where crypto-assets are used, they are required to notify the Gambling Commission. No licensee has informed the Commission that they are directly accepting crypto-asset deposits.

The Commission already has a range of investigatory and prosecution powers, but we are further strengthening its ability to take down criminal gambling websites though the Criminal Justice Bill.

We continue to work with the Commission to consider the risks posed by novel forms of gambling or boundary pushing products.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the potential impact of gambling advertising on gambling harm.

His Majesty’s Government recognises that, while millions of people gamble online without experiencing problems, for some it becomes an addiction with serious consequences. It is particularly important to take steps to protect those most at risk of problem gambling.

There are robust rules in place to ensure that gambling advertising is socially responsible and cannot be targeted at or strongly appeal to children. Gambling advertising is covered by the UK Advertising Codes which are regulated by the Advertising Standards Authority, and there are also specific Gambling Commission licence conditions which regulate how gambling operators advertise. The UK Advertising Codes were further strengthened last year with new protections for children and vulnerable adults.

Earlier this year, we published the white paper on gambling which outlined a comprehensive package of reforms to make gambling safer. This included measures to tackle the most aggressive and harmful advertising practices by preventing bonuses being constructed and targeted in harmful ways, giving customers more control over the marketing they receive, and introducing messaging on the risks associated with gambling.

The Commission has already consulted on improving marketing consents, and we are working closely with them and others to bring the changes into force as quickly as possible.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department plans to introduce age verification checks for online streams of gambling content.

The Government recognises that it is particularly important to take steps to protect young people from online harms and is aware of issues around online streaming of gambling content. We welcome the measures which some streaming platforms have taken to ban the streaming of gambling content where it may reach underage audiences.

Many online streamers of gambling content have affiliations with the gambling sites on which they play to target consumers in Great Britain and encourage them to gamble. This brings them under the current regulatory umbrella for gambling advertising. Where streams amount to advertising then they are subject to the robust rules that are in place to ensure that gambling advertising is socially responsible and cannot be targeted at or strongly appeal to children. This ensures licensees are held to account for the activities of their marketing affiliates.

Further, there are robust age verification requirements in place to prevent children from creating online gambling accounts or accessing facilities to gamble themselves, even where they have seen streams. As outlined in the white paper, the measures introduced in 2019 have been effective in preventing children from being able to gamble online with either their own or invented identities.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions (a) he and (b) officials in his Department have had with people who have been harmed by gambling on the value of trigger warnings on broadcast gambling advertising.

All gambling advertising, wherever it appears, is subject to strict controls on content and placement. Gambling operators advertising in the UK must abide by the advertising codes issued by the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) for online and non-broadcast spaces and the Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP) for TV and radio. The Gambling Industry Code for Socially Responsible Advertising additionally mandates that a safer gambling message must appear on screen throughout all televised adverts, along with the inclusion of the address begambleaware.org (which signposts to a wide range of advice and support related to gambling). The Industry Code also requires safer gambling messages in all radio adverts.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. As part of the wide scope of that Review, we called for evidence on the benefits or harms of allowing gambling operators to advertise and the effectiveness of mandatory safer gambling messages in adverts in preventing harm. The Call for Evidence closed on 31 March and received approximately 16,000 submissions from a broad range of interested organisations and individuals, including broadcasters, sporting bodies and individuals and organisations representing those with lived experience of gambling-related harm. We are considering all the evidence received carefully and aim to publish a white paper by the end of the year outlining our conclusions and policy proposals.

21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions (a) he and (b) officials in his Department have had with (i) broadcasters and (ii) sport organisations on placing trigger warnings on gambling advertising during sport broadcasts.

All gambling advertising, wherever it appears, is subject to strict controls on content and placement. Gambling operators advertising in the UK must abide by the advertising codes issued by the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) for online and non-broadcast spaces and the Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP) for TV and radio. The Gambling Industry Code for Socially Responsible Advertising additionally mandates that a safer gambling message must appear on screen throughout all televised adverts, along with the inclusion of the address begambleaware.org (which signposts to a wide range of advice and support related to gambling). The Industry Code also requires safer gambling messages in all radio adverts.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. As part of the wide scope of that Review, we called for evidence on the benefits or harms of allowing gambling operators to advertise and the effectiveness of mandatory safer gambling messages in adverts in preventing harm. The Call for Evidence closed on 31 March and received approximately 16,000 submissions from a broad range of interested organisations and individuals, including broadcasters, sporting bodies and individuals and organisations representing those with lived experience of gambling-related harm. We are considering all the evidence received carefully and aim to publish a white paper by the end of the year outlining our conclusions and policy proposals.

21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of adding trigger warnings to gambling advertising during sport broadcasts.

All gambling advertising, wherever it appears, is subject to strict controls on content and placement. Gambling operators advertising in the UK must abide by the advertising codes issued by the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) for online and non-broadcast spaces and the Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP) for TV and radio. The Gambling Industry Code for Socially Responsible Advertising additionally mandates that a safer gambling message must appear on screen throughout all televised adverts, along with the inclusion of the address begambleaware.org (which signposts to a wide range of advice and support related to gambling). The Industry Code also requires safer gambling messages in all radio adverts.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. As part of the wide scope of that Review, we called for evidence on the benefits or harms of allowing gambling operators to advertise and the effectiveness of mandatory safer gambling messages in adverts in preventing harm. The Call for Evidence closed on 31 March and received approximately 16,000 submissions from a broad range of interested organisations and individuals, including broadcasters, sporting bodies and individuals and organisations representing those with lived experience of gambling-related harm. We are considering all the evidence received carefully and aim to publish a white paper by the end of the year outlining our conclusions and policy proposals.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, for what reason the revised guidance on amateur choir-singing does not take into consideration the recommendations in the SO695 paper commissioned by Government that choir-singing can be made safer with restrictions including (a) practising in spaces with adequate ventilation and (b) 2m social distancing.

I know that the restrictions on singing are frustrating to large numbers of amateur choirs and performance groups across the country and that many people have made sacrifices in order to drive down infections and protect the NHS over the last year. I can assure you that everyone across the government wants to ease these restrictions as soon as possible.

However, it is important that we take a cautious approach in easing restrictions. We have followed the views of public health experts on singing. We are aware, through the NERVTAG and PERFORM studies that singing can increase the risk of COVID-19 transmission through the spread of aerosol droplets. This was backed up by a consensus statement from SAGE, resulting in the suggested principles of safer singing being published.


We will continue to keep guidance and restrictions under review, in line with the changing situation. Further detail on step 4 will be set out as soon as possible.

21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with broadcasters on suspending betting adverts during the European Championships to protect people at risk of gambling-related harm.

Broadcasters have discretion over how advertising breaks are set and what adverts are broadcast, in line with Ofcom and ASA standards. However, the Gambling Industry Code for Socially Responsible Advertising prohibits most gambling adverts from being shown before 9pm, including a whistle-to-whistle ban for live sporting events.

All gambling adverts, wherever they appear, are subject to strict controls on content and placement, and gambling adverts must never be targeted at children or vulnerable people. The Advertising Standards Authority independently administers these standards through the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) which covers online and non-broadcast spaces and the Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP) for TV.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the recent collapse of Football Index, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of creating a Gambling Ombudsman.

The government is taking the collapse of Football Index and the concerns of those affected by it very seriously, and the Secretary of State and I have met the Gambling Commission to receive urgent updates. We are particularly keen to understand both how this situation came about and what lessons we can learn from these events. Further details will be provided in due course.

DCMS officials were made aware of the challenges facing Football Index in March 2021 shortly before the Gambling Commission suspended the licence of BetIndex Ltd, the operator of Football Index. The Gambling Commission’s regulatory investigation is ongoing. While we have been in close contact with the Commission as it continues its investigation, its role as set out in the Gambling Act is to conduct investigations fully independent of Government. It is not for the government to direct independent regulatory bodies on individual cases.

Our Review of the Gambling Act 2005 is considering a range of questions around the regulation of gambling, including the powers and resources of the Commission and whether any changes to the legislation are required to make it fit for the digital age. The review will also consider whether an alternative system of consumer redress, such as an ombudsman, is needed. Our call for evidence closed on 31 March and we are carefully considering the responses received.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of launching an inquiry into the collapse of Football Index.

The government is taking the collapse of Football Index and the concerns of those affected by it very seriously, and the Secretary of State and I have met the Gambling Commission to receive urgent updates. We are particularly keen to understand both how this situation came about and what lessons we can learn from these events. Further details will be provided in due course.

DCMS officials were made aware of the challenges facing Football Index in March 2021 shortly before the Gambling Commission suspended the licence of BetIndex Ltd, the operator of Football Index. The Gambling Commission’s regulatory investigation is ongoing. While we have been in close contact with the Commission as it continues its investigation, its role as set out in the Gambling Act is to conduct investigations fully independent of Government. It is not for the government to direct independent regulatory bodies on individual cases.

Our Review of the Gambling Act 2005 is considering a range of questions around the regulation of gambling, including the powers and resources of the Commission and whether any changes to the legislation are required to make it fit for the digital age. The review will also consider whether an alternative system of consumer redress, such as an ombudsman, is needed. Our call for evidence closed on 31 March and we are carefully considering the responses received.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what directions he has issued to the Advertising Standards Authority on limiting the number of children that are exposed to gambling advertising.

The Advertising Standards Authority is an independent body. The Government works closely with them across a wide range of areas, including gambling advertising.

All gambling advertising, wherever it appears, is subject to strict controls on content and placement. Adverts must never be targeted at children or vulnerable people. The Advertising Standards Authority independently administers these standards through the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) which covers online and non-broadcast spaces and the Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP) for TV. If an advert for gambling holds particular appeal to children and is freely accessible then it will break the rules.

The Committees of Advertising Practice (CAP) recently concluded a consultation on proposals to amend their advertising codes to further limit the potential for gambling adverts to appeal to children. The broadcast advertising codes make clear that adverts for commercial gambling must not be shown during or adjacent to television programmes directed at or likely to appeal particularly to children.

The Industry Code for Socially Responsible Gambling Advertising also prohibits gambling advertising on television before 9pm, except for adverts promoting bingo or lotteries, and sports betting in limited circumstances (not immediately around or during live sport).

8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps the Government has taken to support football clubs to develop alternative commercial opportunities to gambling advertising and sponsorship.

The government currently has no plans to introduce a requirement for gambling operators to pay a fee or levy to sports clubs and has not had discussions with football clubs about developing commercial opportunities.

The Review of the Gambling Act 2005 was launched on 8th December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. As part of the broad scope of that Review, we have called for evidence on the benefits or harms of allowing operators to advertise and engage in sponsorship arrangements across sports, esports and other areas. The Call for Evidence will remain open until 31 March, and no policy decisions have yet been made. We intend to set out conclusions, including any proposals for change, in a white paper later this year.

8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of establishing a levy on the gambling industry to fund football.

The government currently has no plans to introduce a requirement for gambling operators to pay a fee or levy to sports clubs and has not had discussions with football clubs about developing commercial opportunities.

The Review of the Gambling Act 2005 was launched on 8th December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. As part of the broad scope of that Review, we have called for evidence on the benefits or harms of allowing operators to advertise and engage in sponsorship arrangements across sports, esports and other areas. The Call for Evidence will remain open until 31 March, and no policy decisions have yet been made. We intend to set out conclusions, including any proposals for change, in a white paper later this year.

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the effect on (a) problem gamblers and (b) children of gambling advertising on daytime TV.

All gambling advertising, wherever it appears, is subject to strict controls on content and placement. Adverts must never be targeted at children or vulnerable people, and the Committees of Advertising Practice (CAP) recently concluded a consultation on proposals to amend the advertising codes to further limit the potential for adverts to appeal to these groups. The broadcast advertising codes make clear that adverts for commercial gambling must not be shown during or adjacent to television programmes directed at or likely to appeal particularly to children. In addition, the Industry Code for Socially Responsible Gambling Advertising prohibits gambling advertising on television before 9pm, except for adverts promoting bingo or lotteries, and sports betting in limited circumstances (not immediately around or during live sport).

The government is not aware of specific evidence on the effect of gambling advertising broadcast on television during the day. However, in March 2020 the charity GambleAware published the final report of a major piece of research into the effect of gambling marketing and advertising on children, young people and vulnerable people. That study found that exposure to advertising was associated with an openness to gamble in the future amongst children and young people aged 11-24 who did not currently gamble. It also found that there were other factors that correlated more closely with current gambling behaviour amongst those groups, including peer and parental gambling. Among vulnerable adults, the study found some evidence that problem or heavy gamblers were more likely to report that marketing had prompted them to place a bet or open a new account. It did not suggest a causal link between exposure to advertising and the development of problem gambling in childhood or later life.

The government launched its Review of the Gambling Act 2005 on 8 December with the publication of a Call for Evidence. As part of the wide scope of that Review, we have called for evidence on the benefits or harms of allowing gambling operators to advertise.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the scale of black market gambling throughout the country.

Data released by the Gambling Commission in May 2020 on the black market suggested that the scale of the black market had remained low and stable, with little variation in the number of complaints it had received about illegal gambling websites over the previous 12 months. The Commission continues to monitor this area closely and take action against unlicensed operators where needed.

However, new technologies have the potential to increase the risk posed by illegal unlicensed operators, so it is important that we improve our understanding of these risks and the exact scale of the black market. That is why our Review of the Gambling Act 2005 will consider issues around black market gambling as part of its wide scope, and we have called for evidence on the extent of the black market, its accessibility to consumers, and the risk of one emerging in the future. We have also launched our consultation proposing an uplift to industry licence fees, which will provide the Commission with greater capacity in the short to medium term to investigate and tackle the threat caused by the black market.

The Call for Evidence will be open until 31 March 2021, and further details, including how to make a contribution, can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions he has had with the Home Secretary on improving the movement rights of musicians and performers to work in the EU.

Ministers have regular discussions with their Cabinet Colleagues on a wide range of issues, including cross-border labour mobility with the EU for musicians and other creative professionals.

The Government recognises the importance of touring for UK musicians and other cultural and creative practitioners, and their support staff. Officials from across government engaged with the performing arts sector extensively throughout negotiations. That engagement has continued since the announcement of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement to ensure they are aware of new requirements. Going forward, we will continue our close dialogue with the creative and cultural sectors to ensure they have the support they need to thrive.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster