Angela Crawley Portrait

Angela Crawley

Scottish National Party - Lanark and Hamilton East

First elected: 7th May 2015


Justice Committee
25th May 2021 - 28th Mar 2023
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Attorney General)
1st Feb 2021 - 12th Dec 2022
Approved Premises (Substance Testing) Bill
8th Dec 2021 - 15th Dec 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
27th Oct 2021 - 23rd Nov 2021
Women and Equalities Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 25th May 2021
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Defence Procurement)
7th Jan 2020 - 1st Feb 2021
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Youth affairs)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Disabilities)
20th Jun 2017 - 7th Jan 2020
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Equalities)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Children and Families)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Pensions)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Health and Social Care Committee
13th May 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Women and Equalities Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Child Maintenance)
20th Jun 2017 - 1st Jul 2018
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Equalities, Women and Children)
20th May 2015 - 1st Jul 2018
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Housing)
20th Jun 2017 - 1st Jul 2018
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Family Support)
20th Jun 2017 - 1st Jul 2018
Women and Equalities Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Angela Crawley has voted in 508 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

20 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Angela Crawley voted No - against a party majority - in line with the party majority and against the House
One of 3 Scottish National Party No votes vs 2 Scottish National Party Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 307 Noes - 185
View All Angela Crawley Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Anne McLaughlin (Scottish National Party)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (International Development)
(13 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(10 debate interactions)
Alister Jack (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Scotland
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(23 debate contributions)
Home Office
(22 debate contributions)
Scotland Office
(11 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Judicial Review and Courts Act 2022
(2,424 words contributed)
Miscarriage Leave Bill 2022-23
(1,305 words contributed)
Nationality and Borders Act 2022
(1,046 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Angela Crawley's debates

Lanark and Hamilton East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We have the second most expensive childcare system in the world. A full time place costs, on average, £14,000 per year, making it completely unaffordable for many families. Parents are forced to leave their jobs or work fewer hours, which has a negative impact on the economy and on child poverty.


Latest EDMs signed by Angela Crawley

26th March 2024
Angela Crawley signed this EDM on Tuesday 26th March 2024

Referral of matters of 21 February 2024 to the Committee of Privileges

Tabled by: William Wragg (Independent - Hazel Grove)
That this House notes the Speaker’s decision on selection and calling of amendments on 21 February 2024 was not in accordance with the established precedent for Opposition days; and accordingly considers that, notwithstanding the Resolution of this House of 6 February 1978, the matter of whether undue pressure was placed …
58 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 42
Conservative: 13
Independent: 2
Plaid Cymru: 1
22nd March 2024
Angela Crawley signed this EDM on Monday 25th March 2024

Parliamentary Contributory Pension Fund and Nestlé

Tabled by: Philippa Whitford (Scottish National Party - Central Ayrshire)
That this House notes that a coalition of Nestlé shareholders, with a combined $1.68 trillion in assets under management, has filed a resolution asking Nestlé to set a target to shift its sales towards healthier products; notes that the majority of Nestlé’s sales, 70% in the UK, are from foods …
9 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 6
Workers Party of Britain: 1
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Angela Crawley's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Angela Crawley, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Angela Crawley has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Angela Crawley has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Angela Crawley


A Bill to make provision for paid leave for people who have experienced miscarriage.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 6th May 2022

A Bill to make provision for paid leave for people who have experienced miscarriage.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 6th July 2022
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision about workers’ rights; to amend the definition of worker; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Monday 21st June 2021

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3 Other Department Questions
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether her Department has made an assessment of the effectiveness of the Equality Act 2010 at supporting working LGBT families accessing fertility treatment.

It is crucial that we ensure everyone is treated fairly in the workplace, so that they can thrive and reach their full potential, including LGBT people undergoing - or seeking to undergo - fertility treatment.

While no specific assessment has been made, the Government has set out in the Women’s Health Strategy our commitment to remove the additional financial burdens of self-funding artificial insemination on female same-sex couples, so that they are able to access NHS-funded fertility services in a more equitable way. It is for Integrated Care Boards to implement the commitment to improve access to NHS-funded fertility treatment for female same sex couples, taking account of the relevant equality legislation. Media coverage of, and stakeholder interest in, these developments should help raise awareness, including amongst employers, about the importance of fertility treatment for LGBT family formation.

As part of our Inclusive Britain strategy, published in March 2022, we launched an Inclusion at Work Panel last year aimed at helping employers achieve fairness and inclusion in the workplace.

If an individual feels that they have been unlawfully discriminated against in the workplace, they may wish to contact the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (Acas). They may also wish to contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service which provides free bespoke advice and in-depth support to individuals with discrimination or equality concerns.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of fertility treatment on workplace rights for LGBT families.

It is crucial that we ensure everyone is treated fairly in the workplace, so that they can thrive and reach their full potential, including LGBT people undergoing - or seeking to undergo - fertility treatment.

While no specific assessment has been made, the Government has set out in the Women’s Health Strategy our commitment to remove the additional financial burdens of self-funding artificial insemination on female same-sex couples, so that they are able to access NHS-funded fertility services in a more equitable way. It is for Integrated Care Boards to implement the commitment to improve access to NHS-funded fertility treatment for female same sex couples, taking account of the relevant equality legislation. Media coverage of, and stakeholder interest in, these developments should help raise awareness, including amongst employers, about the importance of fertility treatment for LGBT family formation.

As part of our Inclusive Britain strategy, published in March 2022, we launched an Inclusion at Work Panel last year aimed at helping employers achieve fairness and inclusion in the workplace.

If an individual feels that they have been unlawfully discriminated against in the workplace, they may wish to contact the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (Acas). They may also wish to contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service which provides free bespoke advice and in-depth support to individuals with discrimination or equality concerns.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what assessment her Department has made of the implications for her policies of LGBT discrimination in the workplace; and what steps her Department is taking to mitigate such discrimination.

It is crucial that we ensure people are treated fairly in the workplace, so that everyone can thrive and reach their full potential, whatever their background or characteristics, including LGBT people.

The Equality Act 2010 provides one of the world’s strongest legislative frameworks to prevent and tackle discrimination and harassment in employment against those with particular protected characteristics, including sexual orientation and gender reassignment.

As part of our Inclusive Britain strategy, published in March 2022, we launched an Inclusion at Work Panel last year aimed at helping employers achieve fairness and inclusion in the workplace.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Mar 2023
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment she has made of the compatibility of clauses 21 to 28 of the Illegal Migration Bill with Article 4 of the European Convention on Human Rights.

The Law Officers’ Convention prevents me from disclosing outside Government whether I have been asked to provide advice or the contents of any such advice. This is a longstanding and well-known principle of Cabinet collective agreement.

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
21st Mar 2023
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment she has made of the (a) scope of delegated powers granted to Ministers under the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill and (b) potential effect of those powers on the principles of (i) democracy, (ii) the rule of law and (iii) Parliamentary sovereignty.

The Law Officers’ Convention prevents me from disclosing outside Government whether I have been asked to provide advice or the contents of any such advice. This is a longstanding and well-known principle of Cabinet collective agreement.

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
21st Mar 2023
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment she has made of the compatibility of the Illegal Migration Bill with (a) the 1951 Refugee Convention, (b) the European Convention on Human Rights and (c) the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings.

The Law Officers’ Convention prevents me from disclosing outside Government whether I have been asked to provide advice or the contents of any such advice. This is a longstanding and well-known principle of Cabinet collective agreement.

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has made an assessment of the potential merits of introducing paid fertility treatment leave.

The Government understands the importance of supporting people who are undergoing fertility treatment. We recognise the impact on women and couples of infertility and the importance of fertility treatment in helping them have long wished for families.

While there is no specific right to time off work for medical appointments, there are a number of ways through our existing policy and legal framework in which employees may be able to take time off to attend an appointment. Many employers are also willing to agree ‘ad-hoc’ or informal flexible working arrangements on a short-term basis.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps she is taking to reduce energy bills for (a) disabled households and (b) households on low incomes.

Over the last two years, the Government has demonstrated its commitment to supporting the most vulnerable with one of the largest support packages in Europe. Taken together, total support between 2022 and 2025 to help households with the cost of living is worth £108 billion – an average of £3,800 per UK household.

The Government is continuing to support those most in need with millions of vulnerable households who have received up to £900 in further Cost of Living Payments, with an extra £150 to those on eligible disability benefits. An extra cost of living payment is being paid to pensioner households worth up to £300 through the Winter Fuel Payment, meaning eligible individuals will receive between £250 - £600.

The Government continues to provide support through the Warm Home Discount, which provides low-income households with an annual £150 rebate off their energy bill every winter.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
8th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make an assessment of the potential impact of the installation of prepayment meters on trends in the level of energy debt in the last 12 months.

Ofgem works to protect energy consumers. To ensure that their work is informed by the needs of Britain’s energy consumers, they regularly monitor levels of debt and arrears of UK domestic consumers. This is available at https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/debt-and-arrears-indicators

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
8th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps her Department is taking to help support people who use prepayment meters with increases in the cost of living.

On 25 August, Ofgem announced that from 1 October the prepayment meter (PPM) level of the price cap will decrease by £128 from £2,077 to £1,949 for average dual fuel consumption.

In addition, the Energy Price Guarantee currently aligns costs for comparable PPM and direct debit customers, ensuring that those on PPMs are not paying a premium for their costs.

Ofgem has launched a consultation on levelling the cost of standing charges on prepayment meters which closes on 22 September.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
8th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps her Department is taking to prevent the forced installation of pre-payment meters.

Ofgem, the energy regulator, has developed a Code of Practice to strengthen protections and support for consumers who may be moved onto a prepayment meter involuntarily. This has been agreed with energy suppliers who will be required to demonstrate readiness to implement the Code of Practice.

Ofgem intends for these new protections to be in licence conditions ahead of this winter. Customers remain protected by the current pause on involuntary installations of prepayment meters in the meantime.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
8th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps her Department are taking to support consumers who have accumulated energy debt as a result of using pre-payment meters.

Ofgem rules require energy suppliers to provide extra support where appropriate, including an obligation to make emergency and friendly-hours credit available to all pre-payment meter customers. When assessing how a customer will repay any credit offered, suppliers must also consider their ability to pay.

The Government introduced the ‘Breathing Space’ scheme, which aims to address consumers’ ability to tackle debt and offers legal protections from creditors for 60 days. A standard breathing space is available for anyone with problem debt, administered by debt advice providers and local authorities who provide debt advice to residents.

Customers may also be eligible for cost-of-living payments from the Department for Work and Pensions.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of the increase in the level of the Energy Price Guarantee in April 2023 on households.

The Energy Price Guarantee will continue to ensure all households pay less for their energy bills than they would have otherwise with no Government intervention.

The Government has also announced further support worth £26 billion in 2023-24, to help the most vulnerable households.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps his Department is taking to alleviate the impacts of the rising cost of fuel on low income households.

The Government has set up a number of Energy Affordability schemes to support vulnerable people with the cost of their energy bills during the cold weather. The Energy Price Guarantee will save a typical household in Great Britain £900 this Winter. The Energy Bills Support Scheme provided households with £400 non-repayable Government discount paid in instalments to UK households from October 2022 to March 2023. Households using alternative fuels will be also entitled to a £200 Alternative Fuel Payment.

This is in addition to the cost-of-living support package announced in May 2022 of

  • £650 Cost of Living Payment for those on means tested benefits;
  • £300 Pensioner Cost of Living Payment for pensioners, households across the UK to be paid alongside the Winter Fuel Payment;
  • £150 Disability Cost of Living Payment.
Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment her Department has made of the potential impact of the rise in cost of living on the affordability of internet access for households.

In April 2023, Ofcom’s Affordability Report showed 6% of UK households were experiencing affordability issues with their fixed broadband services, and 8% with their mobile connectivity. For those on benefits these numbers rose to 11% in broadband and 17% in mobile.

To support low-income households, the Government has worked with telecoms providers to ensure market provision of low-cost broadband and mobile tariffs. Social tariffs are available from 27 providers (including BT, Sky, Virgin Media, and Vodafone), across 99% of the UK and start from £10 per month.

In June 2022, following Government negotiations, broadband and mobile operators agreed a set of public commitments to support their customers through the rise in the cost of living, including allowing those struggling with their bills to enter into affordable payment plans or switch to cheaper deals without penalty.

5th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he has taken to support liquified petroleum gas off grid gas users with the rising cost of fuel.

The Energy Price Guarantee will benefit all Great Britain households who are grid connected and buy gas or electricity directly from a supplier. Where equivalent support is needed the Government will provide it to those whose homes are powered differently, including park homes, heat networks and, off grid households.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with Ofgem on (a) differing forms of power production, (b) their differing costs to produce power and (c) the influence of those on setting the market price of a MWHr.

The Renewables Obligation Order (RO) and Contracts for Difference (CfD) sustainability criteria require that electricity generation from biomass does not exceed a set greenhouse gas threshold and produces life-cycle emission savings:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/contracts-for-difference-cfd-allocation-round-4-standard-terms-and-conditions

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/renewables-obligation-sustainability-criteria.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with Ofgem on the (a) energy price cap rise and (b) its criteria of setting the price of a MWHr.

It is Ofgem’s role, as the independent regulator, to set a fair level for the price cap. Legislation sets out that Ofgem must review the level of the cap at least once every 6 months to ensure the cap appropriately reflects the underlying costs of energy, and the need to ensure that energy suppliers who operate efficiently are able to finance their activities.

Ofgem robustly developed and widely consulted on their methodology for determining the cap level, which was last published on 4 February 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to mitigate the impact the energy price cap increase on customers.

The Government is committed to ensuring that support is provided to help consumers deal with the impact of high wholesale energy costs.

In response to the recent energy price cap increase, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer has announced a package of support to help households with rising energy bills, worth £9.1 billion in 2022-23. This includes a £200 rebate for households delivered via their energy bill this autumn, a £150 non-repayable reduction in Council Tax bills for all households in Bands A-D in England and £144 million of discretionary funding for Local Authorities to support households who need support but are not eligible for the Council Tax reduction. In Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, delivery of the council tax rebate will depend on how the Devolved Administrations choose to structure their support; they have flexibility to determine how they use their Barnett funding.

In addition to these measures, the Government will continue to provide support to vulnerable consumers through the Warm Home Discount Scheme, which this winter is providing over 2 million households a £140 rebate off their energy bill each winter. The Government has announced that the rebate will be increasing to £150 and will help an extra 780,000 households next winter. Further, Winter Fuel Payments and Cold Weather Payments help ensure the most vulnerable are better able to heat their homes over the colder months.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with Ofgem on the rise in the energy price cap.

Decisions on the level of the price cap are for Ofgem. The government is in regular contact with Ofgem and industry to discuss the impact of unprecedented global gas prices and will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure consumers are protected.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
4th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential contribution of a four-day working week to the Government’s wider strategy for flexible working.

A four-day working week may work well for some workers and employers. However, the Government does not believe there can be a ‘one size fits all’ approach to work arrangements. That is why we put individual agency and choice at the heart of our consultation on “making flexible working the default”, which closed on 1st December 2021. We are currently reviewing the responses and will respond in due course.

BEIS Ministers attend the Flexible Working Taskforce, which is co-chaired by senior officials and the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development. This considers how to support flexible working in all its forms. The Taskforce’s membership comprises representatives from 16 external organisations including trade unions, voluntary sector organisations, and business groups.

4th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to implement trials of a four-day working week in the UK public sector on similar basis to those underway in Scotland and Ireland.

The Government has no plans to implement trials of a four-day working week in the UK Civil Service.

14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the Government's proposed Employment Bill.

The Employment Bill is a core part of Building Back Better, supporting the Government’s aim to build a high skilled, high productivity, high wage economy that delivers on our ambition to make the UK the best place in the world to work and grow a business. COVID-19 is having a profound impact on the labour market, so it is right that we introduce the Employment Bill when we are sure it will address the needs of businesses and workers in the post-Covid economy. We will bring forward the Employment Bill when the Parliamentary time allows it. In the meantime, we will continue to take necessary action to support businesses and protect jobs.

19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to counter the practice of intentionally shortening the lifespan of consumer products through planned obsolescence.

Subject to the outcome of two public consultations, later this year, the Government plans to introduce ecodesign measures that promote the repairability of consumer products, such as household fridges, washing machines and televisions, in order to increase their lifespan. These measures aim to improve the resource efficiency of energy related products and this will include ensuring that spare parts are available for a minimum of seven years after the placing of new products on the market. They will also ensure that parts can be replaced with the use of commonly available tools, tackling premature obsolescence. We are also seeking powers through the Environment Bill that will enable government to require products to carry information for example relating to product lifetimes, durability and reparability.

Our forthcoming world class energy-related products framework will push products to use even less energy and material resources, in order to reduce carbon emissions and consumer bills, and improve resource productivity.

9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support travel agents during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises the outbound travel sector has been particularly hard hit by covid-19, and we will continue to engage regularly with ABTA and its members about the sector’s recovery.

Businesses in the outbound travel sector have been able to access Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme, the loan schemes, VAT deferrals and cash grants of up to £25,000 for retail, hospitality and leisure businesses, as well as a broad range of other economic support.

Additionally, on 18 July the Government announced that ATOL-protected holidaymakers can book with confidence following confirmation that the Government will protect refund credit notes offered if packages are cancelled as a result of COVID-19.

6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, whether the accreditation process for prospective new lenders can be prioritised so that support from that scheme is available to an increased number of small businesses.

Accrediting new lenders for the Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) is a priority for the British Business Bank. The Bank is working at pace to accredit more lenders to further extend the Scheme’s reach and provide more choice for smaller businesses.

The Bank has put substantial additional resources in place to create a streamlined process within the Bank to help onboard new lenders seeking accreditation as quickly as possible. For example, existing lenders accredited under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) may have an expedited accreditation process for the BBLS.

There are currently 16 accredited lenders for the BBLS.

6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether accredited lenders that assess applications to the Bounce Back Loan Scheme make their assessments (a) based on the applicant's individual merit and (b) not based on the applicant's status as a current business customer.

The Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) has been introduced to help small and medium-sized businesses to borrow between £2,000 and £50,000. Businesses are not required to bank with a lender in order to apply for a Bounce Back Loan with them. A full list of accredited lenders can be found on the British Business Bank website.

To be eligible for the scheme, businesses must:

  • be based in the UK
  • have been negatively affected by coronavirus
  • not have been an ‘undertaking in difficulty’ on 31 December 2019
  • not already be claiming under:

o Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS)

o Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CLBILS)

o COVID-19 Corporate Financing Facility

To apply for the scheme businesses must complete a short, simple, online application form, meaning that applications can be submitted and processed rapidly. Businesses should then be able to access loans within a matter of days. The Government is providing lenders with a 100% guarantee on each loan to give them the confidence they need to support the smallest businesses in the country.

The Government continues to work with banks and other finance providers to help SMEs access the finance they need.

20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to safeguard supplies of (a) gas and (b) electricity during the covid-19 outbreak.

Great Britain has a reliable energy system and maintaining a safe and secure energy supply is a key priority for this Government.

Since the start of the Covid-19 outbreak, we have been in daily contact with gas and electricity operators, the National Grid Electricity System Operator (ESO), National Grid Gas (NGG), and Ofgem, to ensure our electricity and gas supplies are secure.

We have received assurance from all critical gas and electricity operators that they have contingency plans in place to mitigate the impacts of Covid-19; and we are closely monitoring staff absenteeism levels, as well as the supply of key commodities.

Currently, electricity and gas margins are adequate and there is sufficient supply to meet demand. The implementation of the Government policies to delay the spread of Covid-19 is resulting in a measurable reduction in the national demand for electricity and gas.

We are confident that electricity and gas supplies will keep flowing.

6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment her Department has made of the potential impact of increases in the cost-of-living on trends in the level of social isolation; and whether her Department is taking steps to help tackle social isolation.

Many people experience loneliness and social isolation, and the government is committed to building a more connected society, where everyone is able to build meaningful relationships. Having strong social relationships plays an important role in our physical and mental wellbeing, and government, local councils, health systems and voluntary and community sector organisations all have an important role to play in tackling loneliness.

The Community Life Survey, which the department publishes annually, measures loneliness and collects data on people’s social interactions and support networks. Last year we also published research into the factors associated with loneliness in adults, and found that being on a lower income or unemployed was a contributing factor. We also engage regularly with stakeholders like the Jo Cox Foundation, who are monitoring the impact of cost of living pressures on individuals and charities providing services that aim to reduce loneliness.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is also delivering the ‘Know Your Neighbourhood Fund’ to boost volunteering and reduce loneliness in 27 disadvantaged areas across England. The £30 million fund will create thousands of opportunities to bring people together, allow them to develop skills, build relationships and feel more connected to their community.

As announced at the Spring Budget, the department is also delivering a £101.5 million package of support for charities and community organisations in England. As part of this, the £76 million Community Organisations Cost of Living Fund is currently open until 16 October 2023 for applications from frontline organisations, including those that tackle social isolation, that are seeing increased demand for their services and increased delivery costs because of cost of living pressures.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to regulate social media algorithms to reduce user exposure to (a) self-harm and (b) suicide-related content.

Under the Online Safety Bill, all platforms will need to undertake risk assessments for illegal content and content that is harmful to children. This will ensure they understand the risks associated with their services, including in relation to their algorithms. They will then need to put in place proportionate systems and processes to mitigate these risks.

Platforms that are likely to be accessed by children will need to fulfil these duties in relation to harmful content and activity, including legal self-harm and suicide content. Assisting suicide has also been designated as a priority offence in the Bill, so all platforms will be required to take proactive steps to tackle this type of illegal content. The government will also bring forward a new self-harm offence. Companies will therefore need to remove communications that intentionally encourage or assist self-harm.

The largest platforms will also have a duty to offer all adult users tools to reduce their exposure to certain kinds of legal content. On 29 November the government announced its intention for these tools to apply to legal self-harm and suicide content. These tools could include the option of switching off algorithmically recommended content.

11th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether she is taking steps with Cabinet colleagues to help tackle (a) digital exclusion and (b) inability to afford a sufficient, private and secure internet connection to meet essential needs.

We recognise that being digitally excluded makes it more difficult for people to make use of essential services. DCMS is responsible for coordinating HMG digital inclusion policy, and aims to ensure that people across the country from all backgrounds have a base level of digital skills, as well as internet access - two of the most fundamental aspects of digital exclusion.

DfE’s Digital Entitlement allows for adults with no or low digital skills (below level 1) to study for new Essential Digital Skills Qualifications (EDSQs) for free. Out of work claimants can be mandated as part of their Claimant Commitment to basic foundation digital skills provision where the work coach considers this will progress the claimants labour market journey.

On Monday 27 June, 2022, the DCMS Secretary of State met leaders of the UK’s major fixed broadband, landline and mobile operators and agreed a set of public commitments to support households with their connectivity costs.

Since January 2021, DCMS has worked with operators to improve the number and quality of social tariffs in the market. As a result of our engagement, a range of affordable, social tariffs are now available in 99% of the UK. BT, Virgin Media O2, Sky, Vodafone and other providers offer voice, mobile and broadband social tariffs starting at £10 per month for households in receipt of Universal Credit and other means tested benefits.

Public libraries also play an important role in supporting digital inclusion. Around 2,900 public libraries in England provide a trusted network of accessible locations with staff, volunteers, free wifi, public PCs, and assisted digital access to a wide range of digital services. Library staff and volunteers have been trained in digital skills so that they can provide library users with in-person support in using digital applications and services.

11th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an assessment of the impact that (a) digital exclusion and (b) inability to afford a sufficient, private and secure internet connection to meet essential needs have on the poverty premium.

We recognise that being digitally excluded makes it more difficult for people to make use of essential services. DCMS is responsible for coordinating HMG digital inclusion policy, and aims to ensure that people across the country from all backgrounds have a base level of digital skills, as well as internet access - two of the most fundamental aspects of digital exclusion.

DfE’s Digital Entitlement allows for adults with no or low digital skills (below level 1) to study for new Essential Digital Skills Qualifications (EDSQs) for free. Out of work claimants can be mandated as part of their Claimant Commitment to basic foundation digital skills provision where the work coach considers this will progress the claimants labour market journey.

On Monday 27 June, 2022, the DCMS Secretary of State met leaders of the UK’s major fixed broadband, landline and mobile operators and agreed a set of public commitments to support households with their connectivity costs.

Since January 2021, DCMS has worked with operators to improve the number and quality of social tariffs in the market. As a result of our engagement, a range of affordable, social tariffs are now available in 99% of the UK. BT, Virgin Media O2, Sky, Vodafone and other providers offer voice, mobile and broadband social tariffs starting at £10 per month for households in receipt of Universal Credit and other means tested benefits.

Public libraries also play an important role in supporting digital inclusion. Around 2,900 public libraries in England provide a trusted network of accessible locations with staff, volunteers, free wifi, public PCs, and assisted digital access to a wide range of digital services. Library staff and volunteers have been trained in digital skills so that they can provide library users with in-person support in using digital applications and services.

2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing a freelance performers support scheme to support (a) the arts and (b) community attendance of covid-secure live cultural events.

The Government recognises the significant challenge the current pandemic poses to our world-beating cultural and creative industries and to the many individuals and freelancers working across the sector. We are working very hard to help freelancers in those sectors access support.

According to the latest statistics (published on the 25th November), over two thirds of all those who are self-employed in the country have been eligible for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme. Those statistics showed that 76,000 self employed people in the arts, entertainment and recreation sector got SEISS support in phase 1 earlier this year, and 72,000 in phase 2.

Of the £119m available through Arts Council England as part of their Covid emergency support, over £26m has been distributed to individuals, including freelance workers, and organisations via the Emergency Relief Fund and Project Grants Funding (as of 5 November 2020).

Within the £26m, £17m has been distributed to individuals via ACE’s Emergency Response Fund (now closed) and c.£9m has so far been distributed to both organisations and individuals via Project Grants (out of a total of c.£80m available until April 2021).

In addition to the two Funds above, the £119m also includes the following:

  • £6 million distributed by a series of Benevolent Funds focused on self employed individuals; and

  • £18 million available through their Developing Your Creative Practice Fund

The £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) is also benefiting freelancers. Around 40% of CRF awards have gone to non-building based companies (and building based companies are also likely to employ significant numbers of contracted employees), and it is estimated that around 12.5% of business costs by CRF recipients will go to freelancers, artists and casual events staff.

Under the new Tiers which came into force in England on 2 December live audiences are permitted in indoor covid secure venues in Tiers 1 and 2 in line with the capacity caps now in place and provided social distancing is maintained in line with the Performing Arts Guidance.

4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 27 April 2020 to Question 38620 on access to superfast broadband, what measures to support connectivity for vulnerable customers he has agreed with telecommunication providers.

In response to Covid-19, my Department has agreed a package of measures with the UK’s major fixed and mobile providers to support and protect vulnerable consumers, and those who may become vulnerable, with their connectivity needs. This package came into effect on 29 March 2020.

Providers have committed to supporting their customers facing difficulties in paying their bills, removing data caps on all current fixed broadband packages, and giving customers new and generous offers on mobile and landline services (such as data boosts at low prices and free landline calls).

Additionally, providers have committed to giving those who are vulnerable, or have been asked to self-isolate, alternative methods of communication if their fixed broadband services cannot be repaired in the event of faults.

15th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 February 2023 to Question 148721 on Students: Fuels, what recent discussions she has had with relevant stakeholders on the impact of the cost-of-living crisis on students.

Education is a devolved matter, and the response outlines the information for England only.

The department discusses the additional cost of living pressures that are impacting students this year in our regular meetings with stakeholders, including the Office for Students (OfS), Universities UK and the higher education (HE) Mission Groups. The department has also consulted with the National Association of Student Money Advisers to understand the ongoing situation in relation to increased requests from students for hardship awards from their universities.

The Office for National Statistics has twice surveyed students directly on the impact of cost of living pressures. The most recent report, published on 24 February 2023, is available to view here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/educationandchildcare/bulletins/costoflivingandhighereducationstudentsengland/30januaryto13february2023.

On 17 March 2023, the OfS published an insight brief to better understand the impact increasing living costs are having on students. The brief discusses data and research from OfS roundtable events, a poll commissioned by the OfS, and other student surveys to explore how the cost of living is affecting students and how universities and colleges are mitigating its impact.

All households will save on their energy bills through the Energy Price Guarantee and the £400 Energy Bills Support Scheme discount. Students who buy their energy from a domestic supplier are eligible for the energy bills discount.

The Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding (EBSS AF) will provide £400 support to those households without a direct relationship to a domestic electricity supplier in England, Scotland, and Wales, who have faced increased energy bill costs since 1 October 2022. This will include students in privately rented accommodation, where they receive their energy from an intermediary (such as a landlord or letting agency) who holds a commercial electricity contract.

The Energy Prices Act passed on 25 October 2022 includes the provision which requires landlords to pass any benefits they receive from energy price support onto end users, as appropriate.

Tenants should not need to take action to receive this benefit as the obligation is on intermediaries, such as landlords, to pass through the benefit and provide the information necessary to do so. If a student believes this obligation has not been met, they are advised to contact their landlord, or, intermediary to resolve this in the first instance. Within the regulations, there is also scope to pursue enforcement through civil proceedings. Further guidance on the pass-through requirement can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pass-through-requirements-for-energy-price-support-provided-to-intermediaries/guidance-on-the-pass-through-requirements-for-energy-price-support-in-great-britain-provided-to-intermediaries.

Students in purpose-built student accommodation are not eligible to receive support under the scheme, as with fixed rental fees set ahead of the academic year, they have not been exposed to unexpectedly higher energy bill costs this Winter.

For students living in university, or private halls, businesses, including those that provide student accommodation, are covered by the Energy Bill Relief Scheme which provides energy bill relief for non-domestic customers in Great Britain.

The department welcomes the continued efforts of the OfS and the HE sector to look at what more can be done to support students in need of financial help.

20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the impact of the rising cost of fuel on students in the UK.

Education is a devolved matter, and the response outlines the information for England only.

The department reviews the support provided to cover students’ living costs on an annual basis.

We recognise the additional cost of living pressures that have arisen this year which have impacted students.

We have boosted our student premium by £15 million to help students who need extra support. This extra funding, now totalling £276 million, will complement the help universities are providing through their own bursary, scholarship and hardship support schemes. The department works with the Office for Students to ensure universities support students using both hardship funds and drawing on the student premium.

The department has continued to increase maximum loans and grants each year with a 2.3% increase for the 2022/23 academic year and a further 2.8% increase for 2023/24.

Loans can support with students’ living costs while attending university. the highest levels of support is targeted at students who need it the most, such as students from low-income families. Students who have been awarded a loan for living costs for the 2022/23 academic year that is lower than the maximum, and whose household income for the 2022/23 financial year has dropped by at least 15% compared to the income provided for their original assessment, can apply for their entitlement to be reassessed.

All households will save on their energy bills through the Energy Price Guarantee and the £400 Energy Bills Support Scheme discount. Students who buy their energy from a domestic supplier are eligible for the energy bills discount. The Energy Prices Act passed on 25 October 2022 includes the provision which requires landlords to pass any benefits they receive from energy price support onto end users, as appropriate. Further details of the requirements under this Act are set out in the legislation.

The Energy Bill Relief Scheme provides a price reduction to ensure that all businesses and other non-domestic customers are protected from high energy bills this winter, including universities and private purpose-built student accommodation providers.

11th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will outlaw the use of farrowing crates.

The UK already has a significant outdoor pig sector with 40% of the national sow breeding herd farrowing freely on outdoor units with no option for confinement.

We continue to work with the farming industry to maintain and enhance our high standards of animal welfare. The Animal Health and Welfare Pathway, part of our domestic agricultural policy, supports farmers to produce healthier, higher welfare animals. The Government’s welfare priorities for the Pathway include supporting producers to transition away from confinement systems.

We want our farming sectors to continue to be viable and competitive. There are several economic challenges currently being faced by the pig sector, not least costs of feed and energy, which is why we have made the decision that the time is not right to consult on phasing out farrowing crates.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the impact of household food insecurity on households across the UK.

The United Kingdom Food Security Report 2021 includes analysis of food security at household level. The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has recently published new data from the Family Resources Survey on household food security, giving a better understanding of who is most at risk. DWP has also included new questions in the family resources survey for 2021/22 which will be published in March 2023 and will further expand evidence in this area.


DWP is responsible for wider poverty policy, of which household food insecurity is one element.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department will make an assessment of the impact of the increase in cost of food on (a) low income households, (b) students, (c) ethnic minorities and (d) those people earning the national average wage in the UK.

We recognise the impact of rising food prices, which are occurring as a result of global shocks, including the spike in oil and gas prices and the conflict in Ukraine. We are keeping the market situation under review through the UK Agriculture Market Monitoring Group, which monitors all key agricultural commodities.

DEFRA has also increased our engagement with industry to supplement our analysis with real time intelligence. Defra will continue to work with food retailers and producers to explore the range of measures they can take to ensure the availability of affordable food. For example, by maintaining value ranges, price matching and price freezing measures.

Annual food price inflation, reported by ONS, was estimated at 16.8% in January 2023, which represented a very slight fall of 0.1 percentage points on the December 2022 rate and the first fall recorded in 18 months. Although this very small decline in food price inflation was reported for January 2023, more data will be needed before we can know if this is the start of a sustained fall.

Defra analysis, based on ONS data, shows that every one percent increase in food price inflation increases the average annual United Kingdom household food bill by £34. Defra analysis, based on the 2020 1ONS Family Spending survey, highlights that 11% of the total expenditure of the average United Kingdom household is on food. This varies from 14% for lowest income households to 8% for highest income households.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which organisations he has met that are (a) in favour and (b) opposed to the Government’s proposed ban on trophy hunting imports to the UK in the last five years.

Ministers and officials have engaged with a wide range of stakeholders with differing views on trophy hunting over the last 5 years. This has included NGOs, industry representatives, scientists, and foreign government representatives.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he will bring forward legislation to ban the import of hunting trophies into the UK.

We will be bringing forward ambitious legislation to ban the import of hunting trophies from thousands of species as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Feb 2021
What assessment she has made of the effect of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the (a) shellfish and (b) fishing industries.

The TCA is a good deal for British fishermen, it recognises UK sovereignty over our fishing waters, delivers an immediate uplift in quota for the UK fleet and ensures there are zero tariffs on trade in UK and EU goods. We continue to support the industry through the unique circumstances created by the COVID pandemic and adjusting to the new requirements.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of including more language options for UK driving theory tests.

There are no plans to reintroduce voiceovers, or interpreters, on theory and practical tests.

A consultation exercise on the level of foreign language support during theory and practical tests showed that over 70% of respondents supported removing voiceovers and interpreters on tests. The research showed that people were worried and concerned that if tests were conducted in languages other than English, then road safety may be impacted, and fraud may occur.

13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with the PCS union on ensuring that DVLA staff have a covid-secure working environment.

Discussions between the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) and the Public and Commercial Services Union (PCS) about staff safety in relation to Covid-19 began before the initial lockdown was announced and have been ongoing throughout. The Department for Transport has also been involved in those discussions where appropriate.

Staff safety remains an absolute priority for the department and the DVLA and all appropriate measures have been put in place.

The PCS has made clear that our proposals are acceptable in terms of addressing their staff safety concerns.

15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the timescales are for implementing the recommendations of the Global Travel Taskforce, published on 24 November 2020.

From its inception the Global Travel Taskforce was a time-limited body, and it has now concluded its work.

However, the Government is working closely and at pace with industry and our international partners to implement the taskforce recommendations and ensure a safe and sustainable return to international travel as quickly as possible.

The taskforce recommendations addressed three priorities: implementing effective public health measures; encouraging safe growth in demand; and driving a co-ordinated response with global partners.

As a first step, on 15 December the Government introduced the ‘Test to Release for International Travel’ scheme in England, allowing arrivals to pay for a privately provided Covid-19 test and reduce their required period of self-isolation if the test is negative.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the Global Travel Taskforce next plans to convene to discuss the outstanding recommendations from its report, published on 24 November 2020.

From its inception the Global Travel Taskforce was a time-limited body, and it has now concluded its work.

However, the Government is working closely and at pace with industry and our international partners to implement the taskforce recommendations and ensure a safe and sustainable return to international travel as quickly as possible.

The taskforce recommendations addressed three priorities: implementing effective public health measures; encouraging safe growth in demand; and driving a co-ordinated response with global partners.

As a first step, on 15 December the Government introduced the ‘Test to Release for International Travel’ scheme in England, allowing arrivals to pay for a privately provided Covid-19 test and reduce their required period of self-isolation if the test is negative.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)