Anne McLaughlin Portrait

Anne McLaughlin

Scottish National Party - Glasgow North East

First elected: 12th December 2019

Shadow SNP Spokesperson (International Development)

(since September 2023)

Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Immigration, Asylum and Border Control)
1st Feb 2021 - 12th Dec 2022
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Justice)
1st Feb 2021 - 12th Dec 2022
Public Order Bill
25th May 2022 - 21st Jun 2022
Women and Equalities Committee
25th May 2021 - 5th Jan 2022
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
27th Oct 2021 - 23rd Nov 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill
16th Sep 2021 - 4th Nov 2021
Committee on Standards
2nd Mar 2020 - 20th May 2021
Committee of Privileges
2nd Mar 2020 - 20th May 2021
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Women)
7th Jan 2020 - 1st Feb 2021
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Equalities)
7th Jan 2020 - 1st Feb 2021
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Civil Liberties)
20th May 2015 - 3rd May 2017


Scheduled Event
Friday 19th April 2024
Private Members' Bills - Main Chamber
Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill: Second Reading
View calendar
Division Votes
Tuesday 20th February 2024
Offshore Petroleum Licensing Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 41 Scottish National Party Aye votes vs 0 Scottish National Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 226 Noes - 287
Speeches
Monday 15th January 2024
Defending the UK and Allies
In his statement, the Prime Minister told us that one of his motives was the ordinary people of Yemen. He …
Written Answers
Tuesday 6th February 2024
Asylum: Gaza
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the potential implications for …
Early Day Motions
Monday 19th February 2024
Scottish Catholic International Aid Fund’s 2024 Wee Box Appeal
That this House welcomes the launch of Scottish Catholic International Aid Fund’s (SCIAF) 2024 Wee Box Appeal; understands that this …
Bills
Wednesday 6th December 2023
Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill 2023-24
A Bill to make provision for a compulsory registration scheme for certain off-road vehicles; to require such vehicles to display …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 26th April 2021
1. Employment and earnings
Payments from YouGov, 50 Featherstone Street, London EC1Y 8RT, for surveys:
EDM signed
Monday 19th February 2024
Achieving clean air
That this House notes that 15 February marks the anniversary of the death of Ella Roberta Adoo-Kissi Debrah who became …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 6th July 2022
Miscarriage Leave Bill 2022-23
A Bill to make provision for paid leave for people who have experienced miscarriage.

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Anne McLaughlin has voted in 597 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Anne McLaughlin Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
James Cartlidge (Conservative)
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
(27 debate interactions)
Tom Pursglove (Conservative)
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
(22 debate interactions)
Kevin Foster (Conservative)
(18 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(170 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(32 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(25 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Nationality and Borders Act 2022
(20,674 words contributed)
Judicial Review and Courts Act 2022
(13,646 words contributed)
Public Order Act 2023
(8,495 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Anne McLaughlin's debates

Glasgow North East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the Government to commit to not signing any international treaty on pandemic prevention and preparedness established by the World Health Organization (WHO), unless this is approved through a public referendum.

Join other nations in providing a route to safety for refugees. Waive all visa requirements for Ukrainian passport holders arriving in the UK.

Undocumented Migrants are suffering in silence, with no access to adequate Financial support, or any help. The Government should grant an urgent Amnesty of 5years to those with no criminal record so that they could live their lives as normal human beings and pay tax to help the UK economy.

Black Women in the U.K. are 5 times more likely to die during pregnancy and after childbirth compared to White Women (MBRRACE, 2019). We need more research done into why this is happening and recommendations to improve health care for Black Women as urgent action is needed to address this disparity.


Latest EDMs signed by Anne McLaughlin

9th February 2024
Anne McLaughlin signed this EDM on Monday 19th February 2024

Achieving clean air

Tabled by: Caroline Lucas (Green Party - Brighton, Pavilion)
That this House notes that 15 February marks the anniversary of the death of Ella Roberta Adoo-Kissi Debrah who became the first person to have air pollution listed on her death certificate, and extends its deepest sympathies to her family; notes that air pollution is associated with conditions like asthma, …
22 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 11
Scottish National Party: 4
Liberal Democrat: 3
Independent: 3
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
7th February 2024
Anne McLaughlin signed this EDM on Monday 19th February 2024

Hospitality and VAT

Tabled by: Alyn Smith (Scottish National Party - Stirling)
That this House recognises the immense challenges facing the hospitality sector during the cost of living crisis; notes that the Government implemented a temporary cut of 5% on VAT for hospitality businesses during the pandemic; further notes that VAT is not devolved and can therefore only be set by the …
27 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 17
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Labour: 2
Alba Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Anne McLaughlin's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Anne McLaughlin, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Anne McLaughlin has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Anne McLaughlin has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Anne McLaughlin


A Bill to require energy companies to allow a grace period before disconnecting customers with pre-payment meters who have run out of credit; to require energy companies to offer debt management support to all customers; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 24th March 2023

A Bill to make provision for a compulsory registration scheme for certain off-road vehicles; to require such vehicles to display a registration plate; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 6th December 2023
Next Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 19th April 2024
Order Paper number: 2
(Likely to be Debated)

162 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what discussions she has had with representatives of (a) political parties and (b) civil society groups on the enactment of section 106 of the Equality Act 2010.

The Government keeps section 106 of the Equality Act 2010 under review but has no current plans for it to be commenced. We encourage political parties to lead the way in improving diverse electoral representation through their selection of candidates and we are happy to engage political parties and civil society groups on how best those responsibilities can be fulfilled.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what progress her Department has made on bringing section 106 of the Equality Act 2010 into force.

The Government keeps section 106 of the Equality Act 2010 under review but has no current plans for it to be commenced. We encourage political parties to lead the way in improving diverse electoral representation through their selection of candidates and we are happy to engage political parties and civil society groups on how best those responsibilities can be fulfilled.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many and what proportion of civil servants on temporary contracts in her Department are women.

Within the Department for Business and Trade there were 190 staff on Fixed Term or Temporary Contracts on 30 September 2023. 88 of the staff on Fixed Term or Temporary Contracts are women which is equal to 46.3%.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many and what proportion of FTE civil servants on pay band SCS2 in her Department are women.

On 30 September 2023 the Department for Business and Trade had 62.8 FTE of staff on pay band SCS2. 22.6 FTE on pay band SCS2 are women (36%).

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether her Department plans to provide increased levels of financial support to consumers who have accumulated energy debt.

The Government recognises the challenges posed by cost of living pressures, including the impact of energy bills and debt, and is already providing extensive financial support to households. The Government has spent nearly £40 billion protecting households and businesses from spiralling energy bills over last winter, covering around half a typical household’s energy bill, and this comes in addition to the £900 cost of living payments being delivered across 2023/24. This payment has already increased from the £650 payments provided the previous year.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a temporary help to repay scheme that provides repayment matching and debt relief for energy arrears that cannot be afforded by consumers.

The Government understands the challenges that are posed by cost of living pressures that includes energy bills and the impact of debt. However, energy prices have fallen significantly with the price cap more than halving from £4,279 at the start of this year to £1,834 since the start of October.

This coincides with the £900 cost of living payment being provided by the Government across 2023/24, which has increased from the £650 provided the previous year. The Government continues to closely monitor energy prices and will keep support schemes under review.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many appeals have been made to the First Tier Tribunal (General Regulatory Chamber) Environment on Green Deal mis-selling by Home Energy and Lifestyle Management offered by his Department and its predecessors.

The Department is aware of 20 such appeals that have been made to the General Regulatory Chamber of the First-tier Tribunal.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many appeals have been referred to his Department on Green Deal mis-selling by Home Energy and Lifestyle Management.

A total of 348 Homes Energy and Lifestyle Management (HELMS) cases have been referred to the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero (or predecessors at the former Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) for review. 189 of these cases are live; 159 have been completed.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
21st Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what discussions he has had with (a) energy suppliers and (b) Ofgem on ending the premiums for prepayment meter energy customers.

Ministers and officials meet regularly with both Ofgem and suppliers to discuss a range of issues, including prepayment meters (PPMs).

From July, the Energy Price Guarantee will be adjusted so that the typical customer on a PPM is paying the same amount as an equivalent customer on direct debit until 31 March 2024. The Government has asked Ofgem to report by autumn on options to bring charges for PPM customers into line with direct debit customers, including standing charges, so that they are ready for implementation when the EPG ends.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
21st Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will take steps to end the use of premiums for prepayment meter energy customers after the conclusion of the Energy Price Guarantee.

The Government has asked Ofgem to report by autumn on options to bring charges for PPM customers into line with direct debit customers, including standing charges, so that they are ready for implementation when the Energy Price Guarantee ends.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
21st Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department is taking steps to help ensure the end of premiums for prepayment meter energy customers.

From July, the Energy Price Guarantee will be adjusted so that the typical customer on a PPM is paying the same amount as an equivalent customer on direct debit until 31 March 2024. The Government has asked Ofgem to report by autumn on options to bring charges for PPM customers into line with direct debit customers, including standing charges, so that they are ready for implementation when the EPG ends.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when he plans to respond to the letter of 10 February 2023 from the hon. Member for Glasgow North East on a meeting with the APPG on Prepayment Meters.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State confirms receipt of your correspondence of 10 February regarding prepayment meters and your request for a meeting with the newly-formed AAPG. He will respond shortly.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what data his Department holds on the average timescales energy consumers wait for the repayment of debt owed to them by failed energy suppliers, in particular when payments have been made to energy suppliers through standing orders.

The Department does not hold this data. The Supplier of Last Resort process, which can by triggered by an energy supplier exiting the market, is managed by Ofgem.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether energy firms are required to carry out equality impact assessments before forcibly installing prepayment meters.

Equality impact assessments are generally required when a new or revised policy or practice is being considered. The installation of prepayment meters is a long-standing practice dating back several decades and undertaken by privately-owned supply businesses. However, suppliers are required by Ofgem to assess whether installing a prepayment meter, including force-fitting one on customers in arrears as a last resort, is safe and practicable for the customer. This assessment should include identifying any vulnerability.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to his oral answer to the hon. Member for Eltham of 17 January, Official Report column 161 when he plans to send a letter to Ofgem on forcible installations of prepayment energy meters.

The letter will be sent, and published, once advice on this matter has been fully considered.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he will respond to the correspondence of 14 November 2022 from the hon. Member for Glasgow North East.

My noble Friend, the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Corporate Responsibility, Lord Callanan, wrote to the hon. Member on 11 January about Green Deal mis-selling.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether specific financial support for people in off gas grid homes will be available in 2023/24.

The Government monitors prices and will consider further intervention if required to protect UK households from extraordinary fuel prices.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 8 December to Question 102949 on Energy: Meters, how many warrants have been issued to move non-smart meter energy customers to pre-payment meters in the UK since 1 January 2022.

Ofgem does not hold this data for 2022 yet. The Government expects to receive the data in Q1 2023.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many warrants have been issued to move non-smart meter energy customers to pre-payment meters in (i) the UK (ii) each constituency in 2022.

Neither the Government nor Ofgem, the independent regulator, collect this data at the constituency level.

Ofgem's latest data shows that the number of warrants exercised in Great Britain to install a pre-payment meter was 49,552 in 2021. Ofgem does not collect data on this in Northern Ireland.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
23rd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to introduce legislation which requires park home owners in receipt of energy support to pass on savings to residents of those parks.

The Energy Bill Relief Scheme will provide an energy price reduction for eligible non-domestic customers, including park home owners, over the winter. Regulations covering pass-through requirements came into force on 1 November (GB) and 5 November (NI), requiring any park site owner to pass these reductions on to park residents in a just and reasonable way.

In addition, Energy Bills Support Scheme (EBSS) Alternative Funding will provide a £400 discount on energy bills for the small percentage of households who are not reached through the main EBSS fund, such as park home residents. The Government will announce more details shortly.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when annual prepayment meter electricity statistics for (a) local authorities, (b) Lower Layer Super Output Areas, (c) Middle Layer Super Output Areas and (d) postcodes in (i) England, (ii) Wales and (iii) Scotland will be updated.

BEIS produced a one-off publication of annual prepayment meter electricity statistics in March 2019 (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/electric-prepayment-meter-statistics). There are no current plans to update this publication.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to Answer of 16 March 2021 to Question 167254 on Home Energy and Lifestyle Management: Green Deal Scheme, what the updated cost to the public purse is of expenditure by his Department on the Government’s legal department on First Tier Tribunal litigation related to the sale of Green Deal plans by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd.

For Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd appeals at the First Tier Tribunal, the Department has incurred estimated total costs of £142,300 from the Government Legal Department.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total cost to the public purse is of expenditure by his Department on (a) Government Legal Department costs and (b) external legal advice on complaints related to the sale of Green Deal plans by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS).

Since 2017, the Department has incurred £309,992 on external legal advice in relation to Green Deal activity. This figure cannot easily be disaggregated to give a total for purely HELMS-related costs. The Department has also incurred £79,787 in fees from the Government Legal Department on First Tier Tribunal litigation related to the sale of Green Deal plans by HELMS. The Department gave external legal instructions for a small amount of work prior to 2017 but the details of costs are not readily available.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the number of appeals to the First Tier Tribunal as a result of sanction notices issued in response to complaints which do not concern mis-selling as their subject matter but which are related to the activities of Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS).

To date, no appeals have been made to the First Tier Tribunal in relation to complaints which are related to HELMS but do not concern mis-selling.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the UK leaving the EU on UK businesses that hire rather than sell goods.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement secured zero tariffs and zero quotas on trade in goods between the UK and EU.

The Agreement also guarantees that UK investors and service suppliers will be able to access the EU’s markets and will not be subject to discriminatory barriers to trade.

If someone hires goods to the EU, they will need to check the national regulations of the country they are doing business in to understand how best to operate.

If the supplier intends to travel for business, they should check whether they need to apply for a visa, work permit or other documentation before travelling to the EU.

The Department has undertaken no specific analysis in relation to leaving the EU and goods for hire.

10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many complaints in relation to Green Deal plans sold by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) his Department has refused to consider due to breaches of the Code of Practice having taken place more than six years ago.

At 15th February, a total of 244 appeals about the mis-selling of Green Deal Plans by the company Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) have been referred to my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State, of which 137 are yet to receive an intention notice and 153 are yet to receive a sanction notice.

The Department has issued 2 Intention Notices setting out ‘minded to’ decisions not to consider appeals on the basis that they were made more than 6 years after the date on which the alleged breach of the Green Deal Regulations occurred. These decisions have been made in accordance with the Regulations. The Department does not hold data on any further appeals made more than 6 years after the date on which the alleged breach occurred, as it is not possible to categorise appeals as such until case reviews are complete, at which point Intention Notices are issued.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many complaints his Department has received in relation to breaches of the Green Deal Code of Practice by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) which took place more than six years before the date of receipt of the complaint.

At 15th February, a total of 244 appeals about the mis-selling of Green Deal Plans by the company Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) have been referred to my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State, of which 137 are yet to receive an intention notice and 153 are yet to receive a sanction notice.

The Department has issued 2 Intention Notices setting out ‘minded to’ decisions not to consider appeals on the basis that they were made more than 6 years after the date on which the alleged breach of the Green Deal Regulations occurred. These decisions have been made in accordance with the Regulations. The Department does not hold data on any further appeals made more than 6 years after the date on which the alleged breach occurred, as it is not possible to categorise appeals as such until case reviews are complete, at which point Intention Notices are issued.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many complaints his Department has received on Green Deal plans sold by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (a) in total, (b) of which are yet to receive an intention notice and (c) of which are yet to receive a sanction notice to date.

At 15th February, a total of 244 appeals about the mis-selling of Green Deal Plans by the company Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) have been referred to my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State, of which 137 are yet to receive an intention notice and 153 are yet to receive a sanction notice.

The Department has issued 2 Intention Notices setting out ‘minded to’ decisions not to consider appeals on the basis that they were made more than 6 years after the date on which the alleged breach of the Green Deal Regulations occurred. These decisions have been made in accordance with the Regulations. The Department does not hold data on any further appeals made more than 6 years after the date on which the alleged breach occurred, as it is not possible to categorise appeals as such until case reviews are complete, at which point Intention Notices are issued.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many times (a) he and (b) his predecessors have used the power as outlined under Part 9 of the Green Deal Regulations to obtain information from (a) a Green Deal provider, (b) from the Green Deal Finance Company and (c) GDFC Assets Ltd to date.

The Department has requested information from various Green Deal Parties, including Green Deal Providers and the Green Deal Finance Company, on numerous occasions since the scheme was introduced in 2013. However, because there is no formal requirement to state that the Department is using its powers under Part 9 (reg 86) of the Green Deal Framework (Disclosure, Acknowledgment, Redress, etc) Regulations 2012, no record exists of how many times the Department has invoked the powers.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many green deal agreements were issued by Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) for the purposes of installing external building insulation in each constituency in (a) England and (b) Wales.

The number of Green Deal plans provided by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd which included External Wall Insulation in England and Wales by parliamentary constituency are shown in the table below.

In order to manage the risk of revealing personal or commercial data, our approach is not to release non-zero counts of less than five for a small geographic area. Items marked * are small and have been supressed to achieve this disclosure control.

Parliamentary constituency

Green Deal Plans

Bristol North West

21

Chippenham

*

Coventry North West

*

Coventry South

*

Esher and Walton

*

Gloucester

*

North Herefordshire

*

North Swindon

41

Reading West

*

South Swindon

13

Worcester

*

England total

90

Newport East

7

Newport West

16

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total value is of all Green Deal loans taken out by consumers (a) without fees and interest and (b) including fees and interest.

The Department does not hold data on the total value of Green Deal loans, whether taken out with Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) or any other Green Deal Provider.

The then Secretary of State Greg Clark delegated initial reviews of complaints about mis-selling to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 on 24th October 2018. Their consideration is part of the wider review process. Responsibility for deciding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed rests with the Secretary of State, in line with the requirements of the Framework Regulations.

Under this delegation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made recommendations regarding 143 complaints about HELMS. Recommendations may cover whether to cancel or reduce loans, or cover other matters, such as whether to conclude that there have been breaches of the Green Deal Framework regulations. For 69 of these complaints, the Financial Ombudsman Service recommended cancellation.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total value is of Green Deal loans sold by Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (a) excluding and (b) including fees and interest.

The then Secretary of State Greg Clark delegated initial reviews of complaints about mis-selling to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 on 24th October 2018, and as such the Department does not hold data on the total value of Green Deal Loans, whether taken out with Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) or any other Green Deal Provider.

The Financial Ombudsman Service’s consideration of complaints is part of the wider review process. Responsibility for deciding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed rests with the Secretary of State, in line with the requirements of the Framework Regulations.

Under this delegation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made recommendations regarding 143 complaints about HELMS. Recommendations may cover whether to cancel or reduce loans, or cover other matters, such as whether to conclude that there have been breaches of the Green Deal Framework regulations. For 69 of these complaints, the Financial Ombudsman Service recommended cancellation.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, on what date he or his predecessor delegated the initial review of mis-selling allegations against HELMS to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011.

The then Secretary of State Greg Clark delegated initial reviews of complaints about mis-selling to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 on 24th October 2018, and as such the Department does not hold data on the total value of Green Deal Loans, whether taken out with Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) or any other Green Deal Provider.

The Financial Ombudsman Service’s consideration of complaints is part of the wider review process. Responsibility for deciding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed rests with the Secretary of State, in line with the requirements of the Framework Regulations.

Under this delegation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made recommendations regarding 143 complaints about HELMS. Recommendations may cover whether to cancel or reduce loans, or cover other matters, such as whether to conclude that there have been breaches of the Green Deal Framework regulations. For 69 of these complaints, the Financial Ombudsman Service recommended cancellation.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many recommendations the Financial Ombudsman Service has made to him in relation to HELMS complaints in its role delegated under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 to carry out the initial review of mis-selling allegations against a green deal provider.

The then Secretary of State Greg Clark delegated initial reviews of complaints about mis-selling to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 on 24th October 2018, and as such the Department does not hold data on the total value of Green Deal Loans, whether taken out with Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) or any other Green Deal Provider.

The Financial Ombudsman Service’s consideration of complaints is part of the wider review process. Responsibility for deciding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed rests with the Secretary of State, in line with the requirements of the Framework Regulations.

Under this delegation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made recommendations regarding 143 complaints about HELMS. Recommendations may cover whether to cancel or reduce loans, or cover other matters, such as whether to conclude that there have been breaches of the Green Deal Framework regulations. For 69 of these complaints, the Financial Ombudsman Service recommended cancellation.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many recommendations of loan cancellation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made in relation to HELMS complaints in its role delegated under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 to carry out the initial review of mis-selling allegations against a green deal provider.

The then Secretary of State Greg Clark delegated initial reviews of complaints about mis-selling to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 on 24th October 2018, and as such the Department does not hold data on the total value of Green Deal Loans, whether taken out with Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) or any other Green Deal Provider.

The Financial Ombudsman Service’s consideration of complaints is part of the wider review process. Responsibility for deciding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed rests with the Secretary of State, in line with the requirements of the Framework Regulations.

Under this delegation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made recommendations regarding 143 complaints about HELMS. Recommendations may cover whether to cancel or reduce loans, or cover other matters, such as whether to conclude that there have been breaches of the Green Deal Framework regulations. For 69 of these complaints, the Financial Ombudsman Service recommended cancellation.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the average response time is from the Green Deal Ombudsman on a complaint about Green Deal mis-selling once an acknowledgement has been received.

Where mis-selling complaints have not been dealt with to the consumer’s satisfaction by the Green Deal Provider, they are routinely handled by the Financial Ombudsman Service. We do not hold data on response times for either the Green Deal Ombudsman or the Financial Ombudsman Service.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what time targets his Department has for acknowledging complaints from people about Green Deal mis-selling.

In line with departmental targets, we aim to respond to correspondence within 15 working days. This includes acknowledging complaints about Green Deal mis-selling.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to assist food and drink wholesalers who had their trade credit limits (a) reduced or (b) withdrawn by insurers in advance of the full re-opening of the hospitality sector.

The Government’s Trade Credit Reinsurance Scheme will see the majority of Trade Credit Insurance coverage maintained for businesses across the UK. The Scheme operates as a reinsurance arrangement which will see trade credit insurers continuing to write and maintain cover to business throughout the Covid-19 crisis.

We expect to finalise details of the scheme with both insurers and the European Commission soon. Contractual agreements with insurers will be signed shortly afterwards allowing cover that has previously been reduced or withdrawn to be reinstated. If a business feels that their coverage has been withdrawn unfairly they should contact either their previous insurer about reinstating cover, or look to arrange new cover under the same conditions as their previous coverage.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the hospitality sector of many of their suppliers going out of business; and what further support is available to prevent this.

We have been in regular contact with representatives from the hospitality sector, including suppliers, to ensure that we support them during and after the Covid-19 crisis. A number of measures are available to support suppliers to the hospitality industry, such as access to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and government backed loans. Suppliers to badly hit sectors such as hospitality may also be able to access the Discretionary Grant Fund which provides business support grants to businesses affected by the Covid-19 crisis at the discretion of Local Authorities.

The Government is providing additional measures to support the hospitality sector itself, including a VAT reduction to 5% and the Eat Out to Help Out Scheme.

28th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to his Department's news story entitled Action to reduce food waste announced, published on 1 October 2018, how the funding to tackle food waste was spent.

The £15m food waste prevention pilot fund announced in October 2018 was a ring-fenced one-off pilot. Funds were made available in the 2019/2020 financial year. The last scheduled payment was paid in 2022. Awards were made to small and large redistribution organisations for infrastructure to increase their capacity and capability and for Covid-19 emergency surplus food grants. There was also valorising food grants, funding for a Target Measure Act (TMA) field force, citizen behaviour change research, educational resources for schools and support for the hospitality sector. Further information can be found here: Food grants | WRAP.

Robbie Moore
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will reinstate the role of Food Surplus and Waste Champion.

There are no plans to appoint a food waste prevention champion at this time. The objectives set for the champion are now being taken forward by ministers, officials and our delivery partner the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP). The latter includes championing waste reduction through high profile ambassadors in the hospitality sector and well known figures to present Food Waste Action Week.

Robbie Moore
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2023 to Question 3498 on Pension Credit: Applications, what steps his Department is taking to modernise the Pension Credit application process.

Citizens currently have the choice of three routes to make an application to Pension Credit, online, by phone or by paper. Through our Service Modernisation Programme, DWP aims to further improve the process of claiming Pension Credit based on user research with customers and their representatives.

Paul Maynard
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if his Department will make an assessment of the effectiveness of the application process for Pension Credit; and if he will take steps to help increase the accuracy of decisions made on Pensions Credit applications.

The Department regularly looks at the effectiveness of its Pension Credit claims processes. A Quality Framework is used to assess the accuracy of Pension Credit decisions and this informs operational learning and continuous improvement. Pension Credit is being modernised and user research is integral to our design for modernising the Pension Credit application processes to ensure the effectiveness and accuracy of Pension Credit application processes.

Paul Maynard
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when his Department will respond to the letter sent by the hon. Member for Glasgow North East to the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State and Minister for Pensions, dated 24th March 2023.

A reply to the correspondence from the hon. Member was sent on 3 May from the relevant Minister.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will publish the updated uptake figures for Pension Credit for the period March 2022 to March 2023.

In March we will publish the Family Resources Survey for 2021/22. Following this, work will begin to assess whether the data can produce new take-up estimates. In line with the UK Statistics Authority Code of Practice for Statistics I will provide an update at this stage. 2022/23 take up will be published as normal in Autumn 2024.

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when she plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Glasgow North East, dated 30 June 2022, on Pension Credit and the £650 Cost of Living Payment.

I replied to the hon. Member on 29 September.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made on the cumulative impact on the living standards of households in receipt of universal credit of the decision not to up rate benefits in line with inflation in addition to the cut to universal credit and rise in living costs.

I refer the Hon. Member to my response to Parliamentary Question 127316 answered 25th February 2022.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the impact of not uprating benefits in line with inflation on the incomes of households in receipt of universal credit taking into account the reduction in that benefit in 2021.

I refer the Hon. Member to my response to Parliamentary Question 127316 answered 25th February 2022.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made on the impact of not uprating benefits in line with inflation on levels of child poverty in Glasgow North East.

I refer the Hon. Member to my response to Parliamentary Question 126529 answered 25th February 2022.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of personal independence payment applicants who are refused on initial assessment were applying on the grounds of primarily mental health issues between (a) 2018-19, (b) 2019-20 and (c) 2020-21.

In the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) application process, claimants’ main disabling condition is only recorded for collation by the Department at assessment. It is not recorded at the point of application. The Department does not therefore hold data on the reason for application or the number of applicants to PIP with particular conditions. Only those who have a disability assessment determination decision will have a main disabling condition recorded for them.

The Department does collect data on the main disability condition for those who have had a PIP assessment. This can be found in Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/. Stat-Xplore holds data up until October 2021.

The ‘PIP Clearance’ tables contain details of those awarded and disallowed, broken down by disability. The Disability Category ‘Psychiatric Disorders’ includes mental health issues. The full disability hierarchy can be found here: Disability Category / Disability Sub Group (dwp.gov.uk).

Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether easements in respect of universal credit introduced in response to the covid-19 outbreak will remain in place for the duration of that outbreak; and what discussions she has had with claimant groups on ensuring that the most vulnerable people are supported during that outbreak.

Last year, the Department for Work and Pensions introduced a number of easements for Universal Credit claimants, to ensure they could continue to be supported while there were restrictions on face-to-face interaction. Some of these easements are still in place, while others have reverted back to business-as-usual procedures.

Additionally, to provide financial support with essential living costs to vulnerable people and those hardest hit during the COVID 19 outbreak, the Government is delivering an unprecedented package of support, injecting billions into the welfare system. This includes the temporary uplifts to Universal Credit and Working Tax Credits, and boosting Local Housing Allowance by almost £1bn.

DWP provides a range of support to help vulnerable people, especially during the Covid period. Throughout the pandemic, Jobcentres have remained open for anyone who needs face-to-face support and cannot be helped in any other way, which includes all vulnerable claimants, and we have increased the number of work coaches to enable us to continue supporting vulnerable claimants and working with partners to ensure they get the help they need.

DWP regularly meet stakeholders in order to update them on a range of issues and will continue to do so.

27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will publish the risk assessments undertaken by her Department in respect of the return to face-to-face appointments in job centres for 18 to 24 year olds.

DWP takes the safety of colleagues and customers very seriously and all of our offices are COVID secure. We have a suite of Health & Safety risk assessments in place developed following extensive consultation with departmental trade union representatives. These are not specific to any customer group but relate to the safety of everyone who uses a jobcentre and are regularly reviewed, including when services are extended.

These risk assessments cover all of the measures in place to protect staff and publishing them could potentially identify the physical security measures on site, for example, CCTV coverage and therefore put our staff and customers at risk.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she has taken to ensure companies that have been contracted by her Department to fulfil outsourced work comply with covid-related health and safety regulations.

All contractors that deliver the Department contracts are required to deliver their contractual obligations in accordance with all applicable law regarding health and safety as a matter of course. We expect all our contractors to comply with current government guidelines to ensure Covid safe working practices as part of that commitment.

In many instances the Department has supported contractors moving to Covid safe working practices by delivering services to participants using digital platforms, where appropriate to do so and in many cases our contractor’s staff have moved to working from home during the height of the pandemic.

We have also collaborated closely with providers to establish procedures for the safe resumption of face to face services where these are necessary, including advice on social distancing requirements, sanitisation, PPE and face coverings

In specific cases the Department has actively worked in consultation with its suppliers to assess Covid related risk in the workplace and identify ways in which the services can be delivered in a safer manner. Specific examples include –

  • Review of reactive and planned maintenance services on the Department estate, (against criticality and risk) and identification of services which should be suspended or amended for periods of restricted movement
  • Provision of PPE equipment
  • Increased cleaning regimes and social distancing measures implemented across the estate to ensure working environment continues to be Covid secure.
  • Reduction in the numbers of Security Officers required to attend sites in line with reduced Operational requirements.
  • Provision of PPE equipment for those Security Officers required to attend sites

We have also supported providers in meeting and exceeding their obligations under Covid related procedures, for example where Security Officers test positive they are required to self-isolate for 14/10 days and not return to work but still receive their full pay whilst self-isolating.

Unfortunately, the Department cannot attend sites to verify that providers are adhering to Covid safe working practices, as this in itself would breach the same standards.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the 2013 Care Leaver Strategy, what progress has been made on introducing a care leaver marker in the universal credit system.

The Department takes seriously the need to support vulnerable claimants, and wants the application process for Universal Credit to be as quick and easy as possible, ensuring that claimants receive money at the earliest opportunity.

Through locally agreed protocols, Jobcentres and local authorities support care leavers transitioning to DWP paid benefits. This helps ensure care leavers are identified promptly and receive the support they need, for example through the advance claim preparation facility.

All Universal Credit claimants, including those who are care leavers, are assigned to a named Work Coach, with whom they can build a trusting relationship. With the permission of the claimant, a Work Coach is able to record, in a free text format, through the use of ‘pinned notes’ in the Universal Credit system, information which supports staff in identifying and managing relevant experiences and circumstances of individual claimants.

Additionally, the Department funds Citizens Advice and Citizens Advice Scotland to deliver ‘Help to Claim’ which provides tailored, practical support to people making a
Universal Credit claim and is available across Great Britain. Claimants can access this support through self-referral, or may be directed towards or referred to the service by DWP or other support agencies.

11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when she plans to reply to the letter of 26 October 2020 from the hon. Member for Glasgow North East.

The Department aims to respond to correspondence from hon. Members within 20 working-days of receipt. A response is currently being worked on and should be with the hon. Member shortly.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the answer of 14 October 2020 on Question 101290 on Pension Credit, how many (a) successful and (b) unsuccessful pension credit claims there were in each of the last 12 months for which data is available.

This information is only available at disproportionate cost to The Department for Work & Pensions as the Department does not have a business requirement for this information to be retained.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many pension credit claims there have been since the announcement on introducing means-testing for free TV licences for people aged over 75.

The total number of Pension Credit Claims made since introduction of means testing for free TV licences for people aged over 75 from 1st August 2020 is 29,919.

Extract taken from Weekly Pensions Performance Report on 28th September 2020

Source: Weekly Data from CAM (Customer Account Manager)

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps Department is taking to maximise uptake of pension credit.

While over 1.5 million pensioners currently receive Pension Credit, the Government wants to make sure that all pensioners eligible can claim the Pension Credit to which they are rightly entitled. That is why in February this year we launched a nationwide campaign to raise awareness of Pension Credit and help dispel some of the misconceptions that people might have about Pension Credit eligibility.

We are also continuing to work with our stakeholders all across the UK, to help spread the key messages from the campaign because we know that often the best ways to reach eligible pensioners is through trusted stakeholders working in the local community. Our online Pension Credit toolkit (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pension-credit-toolkit) has been updated with the recent awareness campaign materials to supplement the resources it already contains for those working with pensioners, such as guides to Pension Credit and information designed to help older people understand how they could get Pension Credit.

In May this year we also launched an online claim service for Pension Credit to supplement the existing telephone and postal claim services (https://www.gov.uk/pension-credit). The new online service enables pensioners to apply for Pension Credit at a time that suits them.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many pension credit claims there were in each of the last 12 months for which data is available; and what the outcome was of those pension credit claims over that period.

The number of Pension Credit claims received in the last 12 months is shown in table 1 below:

Table 1

Oct-19

Nov-19

Dec-19

Jan-20

Feb-20

Mar-20

10,645

8,318

6,615

8,540

9,574

12,557

Apr-20

May-20

Jun-20

Jul-20

Aug-20

Sep-20

9,567

8,613

9,004

17,087

14,865

15,054

Extract taken from Weekly Pensions Performance Report on 28th September 2020

Source: Weekly Data from CAM (Customer Account Manager)

The figure includes both successful and unsuccessful Pension Credit claims.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Jun 2021
What steps he is taking to support the retention of health and care staff beyond the covid-19 outbreak.

The workforce are at the forefront of our plans for recovery and we are ensuring they get the support they need and have time to rest.

This includes access to wellbeing support and rapid referral to mental health hubs.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, whether his Department has had discussions with cellular network providers in Gaza on the adequacy of telecommunication services in that region.

We are deeply concerned about the severely damaged telecommunications and internet networks in Gaza, which are causing repeated near total communications blackouts. This is limiting the ability of Palestinians in Gaza to communicate and greatly hampers the humanitarian response. Officials are in regular contact with Paltel, the leading telecommunications company in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPTs). We recognise the strenuous efforts of Paltel's staff in Gaza to make repairs and maintain services, at great risk to themselves. The Foreign Secretary's Representative for Humanitarian Affairs in the OPTs is working intensively to address the blockages preventing more aid reaching and being delivered across Gaza.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of Gambian President Adama Barrow on democratic governance in that country.

The British High Commission in Banjul regularly raises good governance and democracy with the Government of The Gambia. We welcome President Barrow's commitment to passing a new constitution during his tenure. The UK-funded International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance has facilitated peaceful and constructive dialogue between Gambian political, civil society, and religious groups to help progress the constitutional reform process. In association with the Commonwealth Magistrates and Judges Association, the UK also provides legislative support and judiciary training for parliamentarians to build capacity within the judiciary system.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department has provided (a) financial aid and (b) technical support for the implementation of the recommendations of the Truth, Reconciliation and Reparations Commission in The Gambia.

The UK is providing support for the implementation of a number of recommendations of the Truth, Reconciliation and Reparations Commission in The Gambia. We have funded the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance to facilitate peaceful and constructive dialogue between Gambian political, civil society, and religious groups to help progress the constitutional reform process. In association with the Commonwealth Magistrates and Judges Association, the UK also provides legislative support and judiciary training for parliamentarians to build capacity within the judiciary system. We are also supporting the Gambian Ministry of Justice to set up a special prosecutors office to ensure victims of Jammeh era crimes have access to justice.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has made representations to his Gambian counterpart on the potential merits of a (a) substantive and (b) timely transitional justice process in that country.

Since the overthrow of Yahya Jammeh in 2016, The Gambia has made progress on consolidating democracy, under the leadership of President Barrow, who won a second term of office in 2020. The UK welcomes the President's commitment to implementing broad constitutional reform. We and other partners are supporting the Government of The Gambia and civil society to achieve this aim. We are also supporting the Government through the Truth, Reconciliation and Reparations Commission to bring to justice those who committed crimes and human rights violations under the Jammeh regime.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
15th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has held recent discussions with the Eritrean embassy in London on recent clashes between Eritrean Government supporters and opponents.

Recent events involving members of the Eritrean community in the UK have, on occasions, led to public disorder and arrests. Ahead of a planned and subsequently cancelled event in the London Borough of Harrow in July, FCDO officials and officers from the Metropolitan Police met with staff from the Eritrean embassy to discuss security plans and arrangements. The FCDO plus relevant police forces and councils will engage with the UK Eritrean community and Eritrean embassy ahead of other events.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Answer of 7 March 2022 to Question 132296 on Afghanistan: Chevening Scholarships Programme, how her Department plans to contact Chevening Alumni currently at risk in Afghanistan.

As stated previously, the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office will be in touch with eligible Chevening Alumni to support them through the next steps on the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme. We are not able to share further details at this stage.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
19th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when her Department plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Glasgow North East to the Minister for Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean of 11 May 2022 on the safety of a human rights activist in the Gambia.

The letter has been responded to.

1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many Chevening alumni in Afghanistan are categorised as vulnerable.

It is not known how many Chevening alumni are currently in Afghanistan.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many Chevening alumni there are in Afghanistan.

It is not known how many Chevening alumni are currently in Afghanistan.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many Chevening alumni in Afghanistan will be prioritised under the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme.

The UK Government will consider at risk Chevening alumni, British Council and Gardaworld contractors for resettlement under the third pathway of the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme in year one. We plan to exceed our initial aim to resettle 5,000 through ACRS in the first year. Overall the ACRS will provide up to 20,000 people with a safe and legal route to resettle in the UK.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the UK global human rights sanctions regime in preventing of human rights abuses in Sri Lanka.

Sanctions are one response among a number of diplomatic tools we can deploy around the world as part of a broader political strategy in order to change or send a political signal regarding particular behaviours. The Global Human Rights Sanctions regime gives the UK a powerful tool to hold to account those involved in serious human rights violations or abuses. We will continue to consider targets globally, guided by the objectives of the human rights sanctions regime and the evidence. However, it is not appropriate to speculate on who may be designated in the future, as to do so could reduce their impact.

The UK Government, alongside our partners in the Core Group, has led international efforts over many years to promote accountability, reconciliation and human rights in Sri Lanka, including at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC). On 23 March the UNHRC adopted a new UK-led resolution, 46/1. This resolution provides a continued framework for international engagement on human rights in Sri Lanka, and highlights serious concerns about the situation, including those detailed in the report of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). It calls on the government of Sri Lanka to make progress on accountability and human rights, and stresses the importance of a comprehensive accountability process for all violations and abuses committed in Sri Lanka. We continue to engage with the government of Sri Lanka on these important issues.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, where and how information in respect of the decision to place a person on the UK Global Human Rights sanctions regime is (a) disseminated, (b) published and (c) reported.

As set out in the Global Human Rights Sanctions Regulations 2020, decisions to designate will be made by the Secretary of State and may only take place where the Secretary of State has "reasonable grounds to suspect" that an individual or entity "is or has been" involved in one of the serious human rights violations or abuses falling within the Regulations. The designation must also be considered "appropriate" having regard to the purpose of the regulations and the likely significant effects on the target. The regulations place an obligation on the UK Government to take such steps as are reasonably practicable to inform a person of their designation and to publicise this. As part of this, we will publish designations on the "UK Sanctions List" on GOV.UK.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what (a) body or (b) person is responsible for determining who is designated under the UK Global Human Rights sanctions regime.

As set out in the Global Human Rights Sanctions Regulations 2020, decisions to designate will be made by the Secretary of State and may only take place where the Secretary of State has "reasonable grounds to suspect" that an individual or entity "is or has been" involved in one of the serious human rights violations or abuses falling within the Regulations. The designation must also be considered "appropriate" having regard to the purpose of the regulations and the likely significant effects on the target. The regulations place an obligation on the UK Government to take such steps as are reasonably practicable to inform a person of their designation and to publicise this. As part of this, we will publish designations on the "UK Sanctions List" on GOV.UK.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many designations under the Global Human Rights sanctions regime her Department has issued on Sri Lankan officials accused of breaches of international and human rights law since the 18 May 2009.

The Global Human Rights Sanctions regime gives the UK a powerful tool to hold to account those involved in serious human rights violations or abuses. No Sri Lankan officials have been designated under the sanctions regime to date and it is not appropriate to speculate on who may be designated in the future, as to do so could reduce the impact of the designation.

Sanctions are one response among a number of diplomatic tools. The UK government, alongside our partners in the Core Group, has led international efforts over many years to promote accountability, reconciliation and human rights in Sri Lanka, including at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC). On 23 March the UNHRC adopted a new UK-led resolution, 46/1. This resolution provides a continued framework for international engagement on human rights in Sri Lanka, and highlights serious concerns about the situation, including those detailed in the report of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). It calls on the government of Sri Lanka to make progress on accountability and human rights, and stresses the importance of a comprehensive accountability process for all violations and abuses committed in Sri Lanka. We continue to engage with the government of Sri Lanka on these important issues.

7th Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to introduce a temporary Help to Repay scheme for energy debts in the Autumn Statement 2023.

Through the energy crisis, the Government has provided unprecedented support for consumers, including by paying nearly half of household bills between October 2022 and June 2023, saving households £1,500 on average.

This is in addition to the benefits uprating and Cost of Living Payments in 2023-24, helping more than 8 million UK households on eligible means tested benefits, 8 million pensioner households and 6 million people across the UK on eligible disability benefits.

Gareth Davies
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2021 to Question 912435 on hire companies and trade with the EU, once the hire company has checked the national regulations of the country it is doing business in to understand how best to operate, what tax is payable when hire goods return through UK customs; what paperwork must be completed; and where hire companies can find the detail of the applicable UK regulations.

If taking goods temporarily out of the UK (including hiring), an ATA Carnet can help simplify customs formalities by allowing a single document to be used for clearing goods through customs in the countries that are part of the ATA Carnet system. Both the UK and all EU Member States accept ATA Carnets. In the UK, ATA Carnets are administered by the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI). Business wishing to use ATA Carnets are advised to contact the LCCI directly to discuss their business needs.

Temporary Admission offers an alternative means to import goods temporarily into the EU, provided the relevant conditions are met. The management of EU import and export procedures is the responsibility of the customs authorities of the EU Member States so businesses and individuals should confirm the processes at their port of arrival.

Businesses re-importing goods into the UK can claim relief from import VAT and any customs duty under Returned Goods Relief (RGR), provided specific conditions are met. RGR applies to goods exported from the UK and re-imported within three years in an unaltered state and can apply to goods which are imported into the UK following their export from the UK under Temporary Admission or with an ATA Carnet.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made for the implications of his policies of the data collected by the Federation of Wholesale Distributors on the risk to wholesale businesses of liquidation.

The Government fully recognises the extreme disruption to people’s lives, jobs and businesses caused by the necessary actions taken to tackle COVID-19. It is for this reason that the Government has announced unprecedented levels of support for workers and businesses. Food and drink wholesalers, which have played a critical role in supporting the food supply chain throughout the past months, are eligible for a number of these schemes, including:

• The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help keep millions of people in employment;
• £10,000 cash grants for all business properties in receipt of Small Business Rates Relief and Rural Rates Relief;
• The Bounce Back Loan Scheme for small businesses to borrow between £2,000 to £50,000, with no interest payments or fees for the first 12 months; and
• The Discretionary Grant Fund for small and micro businesses that are not eligible for other grant schemes.

Food and drink wholesalers will also benefit from the Chancellor’s recent announcement of the Eat Out to Help Out Scheme which will encourage people to safely return to eating out at restaurants for sit-down meals.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the potential implications for his Department's policies on deciding asylum applications of the conflict in Gaza.

Asylum claims made by claimants from Gaza, as is the case with all asylum claims lodged in the UK and admitted to the UK asylum system, have an individual assessment made against the background of relevant case law, policy guidance and the latest available country of origin information.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department is taking steps to expedite applications for resettlement to the UK by Afghan nationals in Pakistan who are at risk of being removed to Afghanistan.

We will continue to honour our commitment to bring eligible Afghans to the UK and plans are underway to relocate families as soon as possible.

Afghans in third countries including in Pakistan who are eligible for resettlement to the UK continue to be supported by the UK Government, and flights from Pakistan to the UK continue to take place. However, we are unable to provide further operational details on this.

The UK Government is aware of recent announcements made by the Government of Pakistan regarding Afghans being illegally present in Pakistan. We have engaged intensively with the Government of Pakistan to secure assurances that none of those eligible under Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will be subject to deportation while they await relocation to the UK.

15th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department is taking steps to help ensure the safety of Eritrean refugees.

Articles 10 and 11 of the European Convention on Human Rights state that everyone has the right to freedom of expression, assembly and association. This Government fully supports these rights, including the right of individuals to protest peacefully.

There is a long tradition in this country of people being free to assemble and demonstrate their views, however uncomfortable they may make others, provided they do so within the law.

Of course, there is a balance to be struck. The right to peaceful protest does not extend to violent behaviour. The police have powers to deal with such behaviour and we expect them to use them where appropriate.

The management of protests is an operational matter for the police. The police have a duty to ensure the protection and safety of all individuals, regardless of their background, origin or views and will take appropriate steps to do so.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she is taking steps to help ensure that the rights of Eritrean refugees in the UK to protest against acts of the Eritrean Government are protected.

Articles 10 and 11 of the European Convention on Human Rights state that everyone has the right to freedom of expression, assembly and association. This Government fully supports these rights, including the right of individuals to protest peacefully.

There is a long tradition in this country of people being free to assemble and demonstrate their views, provided they do so within the law.

Therefore, should Eritrean refugees in the UK wish to protest against the Eritrean government they are well within their right to do so, as long as such protests are conducted peacefully and in accordance with the law.

The management of demonstrations is an operational matter for the police. In certain circumstances, the police have a duty to take reasonable steps to protect those wishing to exercise their rights peacefully and to consider any potential risk to public safety.

Similarly, the management of community events, including decisions on their approval, is a matter for the relevant local authority.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to publish an (a) equality and (b) economic impact assessment of the Illegal Migration Bill.

We will publish an equality impact assessment and economic impact assessment in respect of the Illegal Migration Bill in due course.

22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many new asylum applications were submitted in 2022 by people who had previously been refused asylum.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum and detention in the ‘Immigration System Statistics Quarterly Release’.

Data on asylum applications by nationality is published in table Asy_D01 of the ‘asylum and resettlement detailed datasets’. Data on the number of people entering, in and leaving detention with an asylum claim is published in table Det_01 of the ‘detention summary tables’.

Information on how to use the datasets can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to December 2022.

The Home Office does not publish information on applications from individuals previously refused asylum.

22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people applied for asylum in 2022 from detention in the UK.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum and detention in the ‘Immigration System Statistics Quarterly Release’.

Data on asylum applications by nationality is published in table Asy_D01 of the ‘asylum and resettlement detailed datasets’. Data on the number of people entering, in and leaving detention with an asylum claim is published in table Det_01 of the ‘detention summary tables’.

Information on how to use the datasets can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to December 2022.

The Home Office does not publish information on applications from individuals previously refused asylum.

17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to respond to the letter of 2 February 2023 from the hon. Member for Glasgow North East.

This response was issued on 21 February 2023.

20th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the cost to his Department was of the additional administration necessitated by the change of the Home Secretary on 19 October 2022.

There are associated IT costs, but as devices are returned to the department upon exit, cost is mitigated. The Home Office does not hold records of other administrative costs.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of female Afghan refugees who arrived in the UK since 15 August 2021 are in full-time education as on 2 September 2022.

Afghans resettling in the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will be supported in accessing accommodation and the vital health, education, and support into employment they need, to fully integrate into society.

The Department for Education have confirmed that individuals resettling under these schemes who wish to access higher education, are eligible for home fee status and student support from the 2022/23 academic year – putting them on the same footing as refugees. At this time, the Home Office is working to improve the data it holds on those who have accessed higher education among those being temporarily accommodated in hotels.

All children who were evacuated during Op Pitting have been enrolled in school - and school places are offered on a rolling basis, as more children arrive in the UK. .

As stated in the recently published, 'Afghan Resettlement: Operational Data' factsheet, at 12 Aug 2022, the UK:

  • Has welcomed 21,450 people to the UK from Afghanistan - or a neighbouring country - since June 2021. Whilst we believe that around half of this number are children, we are unable, at this time, to provide an accurate breakdown of arrivals by age, in order to determine how many children are in full-time education.

  • Is providing temporary accommodation for 9,667 people in hotels.

Officials are working at pace to assure information relating to the individuals resettling in the UK under our bespoke schemes for Afghans on case working systems. Once this work concludes, the Home Office will include Afghan resettlement statistics in its quarterly Immigration Statistics publications.

Until then the factsheet will be updated every quarter – with the next iteration scheduled for publication on 24 November 2022.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of Afghan child refugees who arrived in the UK since 15 August 2021 are in full-time education as on 2 September 2022.

Afghans resettling in the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will be supported in accessing accommodation and the vital health, education, and support into employment they need, to fully integrate into society.

The Department for Education have confirmed that individuals resettling under these schemes who wish to access higher education, are eligible for home fee status and student support from the 2022/23 academic year – putting them on the same footing as refugees. At this time, the Home Office is working to improve the data it holds on those who have accessed higher education among those being temporarily accommodated in hotels.

All children who were evacuated during Op Pitting have been enrolled in school - and school places are offered on a rolling basis, as more children arrive in the UK. .

As stated in the recently published, 'Afghan Resettlement: Operational Data' factsheet, at 12 Aug 2022, the UK:

  • Has welcomed 21,450 people to the UK from Afghanistan - or a neighbouring country - since June 2021. Whilst we believe that around half of this number are children, we are unable, at this time, to provide an accurate breakdown of arrivals by age, in order to determine how many children are in full-time education.

  • Is providing temporary accommodation for 9,667 people in hotels.

Officials are working at pace to assure information relating to the individuals resettling in the UK under our bespoke schemes for Afghans on case working systems. Once this work concludes, the Home Office will include Afghan resettlement statistics in its quarterly Immigration Statistics publications.

Until then the factsheet will be updated every quarter – with the next iteration scheduled for publication on 24 November 2022.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of Afghan refugees who arrived in the UK since 15 August 2021 are living in hotel accommodation as on 2 September 2022.

Afghans resettling in the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will be supported in accessing accommodation and the vital health, education, and support into employment they need, to fully integrate into society.

The Department for Education have confirmed that individuals resettling under these schemes who wish to access higher education, are eligible for home fee status and student support from the 2022/23 academic year – putting them on the same footing as refugees. At this time, the Home Office is working to improve the data it holds on those who have accessed higher education among those being temporarily accommodated in hotels.

All children who were evacuated during Op Pitting have been enrolled in school - and school places are offered on a rolling basis, as more children arrive in the UK. .

As stated in the recently published, 'Afghan Resettlement: Operational Data' factsheet, at 12 Aug 2022, the UK:

  • Has welcomed 21,450 people to the UK from Afghanistan - or a neighbouring country - since June 2021. Whilst we believe that around half of this number are children, we are unable, at this time, to provide an accurate breakdown of arrivals by age, in order to determine how many children are in full-time education.

  • Is providing temporary accommodation for 9,667 people in hotels.

Officials are working at pace to assure information relating to the individuals resettling in the UK under our bespoke schemes for Afghans on case working systems. Once this work concludes, the Home Office will include Afghan resettlement statistics in its quarterly Immigration Statistics publications.

Until then the factsheet will be updated every quarter – with the next iteration scheduled for publication on 24 November 2022.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan child refugees have arrived in the UK since 15 August 2021.

Afghans resettling in the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and the Afghan Citizens’ Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will be supported in accessing accommodation and the vital health, education, and support into employment they need, to fully integrate into society.

The Department for Education have confirmed that individuals resettling under these schemes who wish to access higher education, are eligible for home fee status and student support from the 2022/23 academic year – putting them on the same footing as refugees. At this time, the Home Office is working to improve the data it holds on those who have accessed higher education among those being temporarily accommodated in hotels.

All children who were evacuated during Op Pitting have been enrolled in school - and school places are offered on a rolling basis, as more children arrive in the UK.

As stated in the recently published, 'Afghan Resettlement: Operational Data' factsheet, at 12 August 2022, the UK:

  • Has welcomed 21,450 people to the UK from Afghanistan - or a neighbouring country - since June 2021. Whilst we believe that around half of this number are children, we are unable, at this time, to provide an accurate breakdown of arrivals by age, in order to determine how many children are in full-time education.

  • Is providing temporary accommodation for 9,667 people in hotels.

Officials are working at pace to assure information relating to the individuals resettling in the UK under our bespoke schemes for Afghans on case working systems. Once this work concludes, the Home Office will include Afghan resettlement statistics in its quarterly Immigration Statistics publications.

Until then the factsheet will be updated every quarter – with the next iteration scheduled for publication on 24 November 2022.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of Afghan child refugees who arrived in the UK since 15 August 2021 are not in full-time education as on 2 September 2022.

Afghans resettling in the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will be supported in accessing accommodation and the vital health, education, and support into employment they need, to fully integrate into society.

The Department for Education have confirmed that individuals resettling under these schemes who wish to access higher education, are eligible for home fee status and student support from the 2022/23 academic year – putting them on the same footing as refugees. At this time, the Home Office is working to improve the data it holds on those who have accessed higher education among those being temporarily accommodated in hotels.

All children who were evacuated during Op Pitting have been enrolled in school - and school places are offered on a rolling basis, as more children arrive in the UK. .

As stated in the recently published, 'Afghan Resettlement: Operational Data' factsheet, at 12 Aug 2022, the UK:

  • Has welcomed 21,450 people to the UK from Afghanistan - or a neighbouring country - since June 2021. Whilst we believe that around half of this number are children, we are unable, at this time, to provide an accurate breakdown of arrivals by age, in order to determine how many children are in full-time education.

  • Is providing temporary accommodation for 9,667 people in hotels.

Officials are working at pace to assure information relating to the individuals resettling in the UK under our bespoke schemes for Afghans on case working systems. Once this work concludes, the Home Office will include Afghan resettlement statistics in its quarterly Immigration Statistics publications.

Until then the factsheet will be updated every quarter – with the next iteration scheduled for publication on 24 November 2022.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of Afghan refugees who applied to the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme remain in Afghanistan as on 2 September 2022.

Afghans resettling in the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will be supported in accessing accommodation and the vital health, education, and support into employment they need, to fully integrate into society.

The Department for Education have confirmed that individuals resettling under these schemes who wish to access higher education, are eligible for home fee status and student support from the 2022/23 academic year – putting them on the same footing as refugees. At this time, the Home Office is working to improve the data it holds on those who have accessed higher education among those being temporarily accommodated in hotels.

All children who were evacuated during Op Pitting have been enrolled in school - and school places are offered on a rolling basis, as more children arrive in the UK. .

As stated in the recently published, 'Afghan Resettlement: Operational Data' factsheet, at 12 Aug 2022, the UK:

  • Has welcomed 21,450 people to the UK from Afghanistan - or a neighbouring country - since June 2021. Whilst we believe that around half of this number are children, we are unable, at this time, to provide an accurate breakdown of arrivals by age, in order to determine how many children are in full-time education.

  • Is providing temporary accommodation for 9,667 people in hotels.

Officials are working at pace to assure information relating to the individuals resettling in the UK under our bespoke schemes for Afghans on case working systems. Once this work concludes, the Home Office will include Afghan resettlement statistics in its quarterly Immigration Statistics publications.

Until then the factsheet will be updated every quarter – with the next iteration scheduled for publication on 24 November 2022.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of Afghan refugees who applied to the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme are in the UK as on 2 September 2022.

Afghans resettling in the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will be supported in accessing accommodation and the vital health, education, and support into employment they need, to fully integrate into society.

The Department for Education have confirmed that individuals resettling under these schemes who wish to access higher education, are eligible for home fee status and student support from the 2022/23 academic year - putting them on the same footing as refugees. At this time, the Home Office is working to improve the data it holds on those who have accessed higher education among those being temporarily accommodated in hotels.

All children who were evacuated during Op Pitting have been enrolled in school - and school places are offered on a rolling basis, as more children arrive in the UK. .

As stated in the recently published, 'Afghan Resettlement: Operational Data' factsheet, at 12 Aug 2022, the UK:

  • Has welcomed 21,450 people to the UK from Afghanistan - or a neighbouring country - since June 2021. Whilst we believe that around half of this number are children, we are unable, at this time, to provide an accurate breakdown of arrivals by age, in order to determine how many children are in full-time education.
  • Is providing temporary accommodation for 9,667 people in hotels.

Officials are working at pace to assure information relating to the individuals resettling in the UK under our bespoke schemes for Afghans on case working systems. Once this work concludes, the Home Office will include Afghan resettlement statistics in its quarterly Immigration Statistics publications.

Until then the factsheet will be updated every quarter - with the next iteration scheduled for publication on 24 November 2022.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to Answer of 23 June to Question 21222, what the estimated cost to the public purse is of the pilot scheme to electronically monitor asylum claimants who arrive in the UK per person, per month.

The estimated cost for the pilot is £5.942m. This is an allocated sum for the duration of the pilot and not an annual budget. It will be reviewed at the conclusion of the pilot.

Given the uncertainty on the exact number of individuals who will be suitable for tagging and the duration in which they will be subject to electronic monitoring, we are unable to provide a breakdown of costs at this time.

24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2022 to Question 21222 on Asylum: Electronic Tagging, what the estimated cost to the public purse is of the pilot programme establishing whether electronic monitoring is an effective way to improve and maintain regular contact management with asylum claimants who arrive in the UK in order to progress their immigration case.

The estimated cost for the pilot is £5.942m. This is an allocated sum for the duration of the pilot and not an annual budget. It will be reviewed at the conclusion of the pilot.

Given the uncertainty on the exact number of individuals who will be suitable for tagging and the duration in which they will be subject to electronic monitoring, we are unable to provide a breakdown of costs at this time.

24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average time it takes is between an asylum seeker applying for an initial screening interview and them receiving one.

The Nationality and Borders Act (NABA) became law on 28 April 2022. This new, ground-breaking legislation replaces a decades old system. It will deter illegal entry into the UK, breaking the business model of people-smuggling networks, and speed up the removal of those with no right to be in the UK. This will free up the asylum system so we can better support those in genuine need of asylum through safe and legal routes.

At the same time, we are investing in a programme of transformation and business improvement initiatives to speed up decision making, reduce the time people spend in the asylum system and decrease the number of people who are awaiting an interview or decision.

On the 24 June 2022, 466 had asylum screening appointments scheduled, which was 11.5% of those awaiting an appointment. Since 28 June 2022, the National Asylum Intake Unit will schedule 65% of appointments within 10 days of registering an asylum claim.

24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion asylum seekers have been been allocated an initial screening appointment as of 24 June 2022.

The Nationality and Borders Act (NABA) became law on 28 April 2022. This new, ground-breaking legislation replaces a decades old system. It will deter illegal entry into the UK, breaking the business model of people-smuggling networks, and speed up the removal of those with no right to be in the UK. This will free up the asylum system so we can better support those in genuine need of asylum through safe and legal routes.

At the same time, we are investing in a programme of transformation and business improvement initiatives to speed up decision making, reduce the time people spend in the asylum system and decrease the number of people who are awaiting an interview or decision.

On the 24 June 2022, 466 had asylum screening appointments scheduled, which was 11.5% of those awaiting an appointment. Since 28 June 2022, the National Asylum Intake Unit will schedule 65% of appointments within 10 days of registering an asylum claim.

24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of asylum seekers awaiting an initial screening interview are in receipt of section 98 support.

The latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers on Asylum Support. These statistics can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets#asylum-support.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of these statistics which disaggregates the number of asylum seekers awaiting an initial screening interview are in receipt of section 98 support. These figures are not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the estimated annual cost to the public purse is of the proposal to electronically tag and monitor asylum seekers arriving in the UK.

The government is undertaking a pilot which will operate for a period of 12 months with the purpose of establishing whether electronic monitoring is an effective way to improve and maintain regular contact management with asylum claimants who arrive in the UK via unnecessary and dangerous routes, in order to progress their immigration case.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
7th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to the correspondence of 19 May 2022 from the hon. Member for Glasgow North East regarding the Queen's Speech debate on 11 May 2022.

I apologise for the delay; the Home Office will respond shortly.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the (a) oral evidence from the Home Secretary to the Justice and Home Affairs Select Committee of 27 October 2021 on the proportion of people arriving illegally in the UK via small boats in the previous 12 months who were economic migrants and (b) immigration statistics published on 26 May 2022 relating to the proportion of positive asylum claims among young men aged 18 to 29, if she will clarify the proportion of single men aged 18 to 29 who arrived illegally in the UK via small boats in the 12 months to 31 March 2022 who were (i) granted (A) refugee status and (B) humanitarian protection and (ii) identified as economic migrants.

People should claim asylum in the first safe country they reach rather than making dangerous and illegal crossings. For those with specific protection needs which mean they can no longer stay in a host country, the UK works with the UNHCR to offer a safe and legal route to resettlement in the UK.

Our New Plan for Immigration will break the business model of international criminal gangs by making the UK a less attractive destination for illegal migrants. It will furthermore differentiate between those who arrive here through safe and legal routes and those who seek to circumvent this system. It will also speed up the asylum claims system so that we can separate the genuine asylum seekers from economic migrants quickly.

The overall grant rate can vary for several reasons, including the protection needs of those who claim asylum in the UK, along with operational resourcing and policy decisions. Grant rates vary considerably by nationality as the protection needs of specific groups or individuals differ, usually depending on the situation in their home country.

The Home Office are unable to state the proportion of single men aged 18 to 29 who arrived illegally in the UK by small boats in the 12 months to 31 March 2022 who were granted refugee status and humanitarian protection and identified as economic migrants as this information is not published or held in a reportable format.

The latest data on illegal migration can be found at: Irregular migration to the UK, year ending March 2022 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

The latest data on asylum applications, initial decisions and resettlement can be found at: List of tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

19th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if capacity has been exceeded in Immigration Removal Centres other than Dungavel IRC since 14 April 2022.

We operate the immigration removal estate in a flexible manner and in line with the Short Term Holding Facility (STHF) Rules 2018 and the Detention Centre Rules 2001, as appropriate.

In order to support the management of the arrival of migrants by boat, we have temporarily accommodated people under the provisions of the STHF Rules 2018, in a small number of immigration removal centres (IRCs) including Dungavel House. Dungavel IRC is only considered when capacity is exceeded at other facilities, or contingencies are exhausted. Since 14 April 2022 Dungavel IRC has not operated as a STHF to accommodate clandestine migrant arrivals.

There have been no occasions since 14 April 2022 when capacity has been exceeded in any IRC.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
19th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to Answer of 21 April 2022 to Question 54123, how many times Dungavel IRC has been used to process clandestine arrivals by boat since 14 April 2022.

We operate the immigration removal estate in a flexible manner and in line with the Short Term Holding Facility (STHF) Rules 2018 and the Detention Centre Rules 2001, as appropriate.

In order to support the management of the arrival of migrants by boat, we have temporarily accommodated people under the provisions of the STHF Rules 2018, in a small number of immigration removal centres (IRCs) including Dungavel House. Dungavel IRC is only considered when capacity is exceeded at other facilities, or contingencies are exhausted. Since 14 April 2022 Dungavel IRC has not operated as a STHF to accommodate clandestine migrant arrivals.

There have been no occasions since 14 April 2022 when capacity has been exceeded in any IRC.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what criteria and process will be used to determine whether a person is suitable to be accommodated at the proposed new asylum accommodation centre at RAF Linton-on-Ouse; and whether those are the same as the criteria and process for Napier Barracks, as set out in her Department's Allocation of Accommodation policy.

307 - Prior to an individual being allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse, an assessment will take place by the Home Office using a suitability criteria.

Should an individual be allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse and information comes to light meaning they are no longer suitable, their case will be reviewed, and alternative suitable accommodation will be allocated under existing arrangements.

The Service Provider has responsibility to notify the Home Office of any change in circumstances of those allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse. As part of the individual’s induction on site, they will be given Migrant Help’s number to report any issues or concerns, including the suitability of the accommodation.

306 - Those housed in asylum accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse will not be considered for relocation to Rwanda. There are no plans to use the Air strip for flights.

308 - To ensure the safety and wellbeing of those allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse, an assessment will take place by the Home Office prior to allocation using suitability criteria. The factors which are currently considered when assessing the suitability of individual asylum seekers to particular accommodation is set out in the policy guidance ‘Allocation of Accommodation’.

This policy guidance will be reviewed as part of any preparations to open asylum accommodation in Linton-on-Ouse.

305 - Those housed in asylum accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse will not be considered for relocation to Rwanda.

10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what safeguards will be in place at the proposed new asylum accommodation centre at RAF Linton-on-Ouse to protect people with vulnerabilities.

307 - Prior to an individual being allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse, an assessment will take place by the Home Office using a suitability criteria.

Should an individual be allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse and information comes to light meaning they are no longer suitable, their case will be reviewed, and alternative suitable accommodation will be allocated under existing arrangements.

The Service Provider has responsibility to notify the Home Office of any change in circumstances of those allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse. As part of the individual’s induction on site, they will be given Migrant Help’s number to report any issues or concerns, including the suitability of the accommodation.

306 - Those housed in asylum accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse will not be considered for relocation to Rwanda. There are no plans to use the Air strip for flights.

308 - To ensure the safety and wellbeing of those allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse, an assessment will take place by the Home Office prior to allocation using suitability criteria. The factors which are currently considered when assessing the suitability of individual asylum seekers to particular accommodation is set out in the policy guidance ‘Allocation of Accommodation’.

This policy guidance will be reviewed as part of any preparations to open asylum accommodation in Linton-on-Ouse.

305 - Those housed in asylum accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse will not be considered for relocation to Rwanda.

10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether flights to Rwanda or other destinations will be operated from the proposed new asylum accommodation centre at RAF Linton-on-Ouse while it is used as asylum accommodation.

307 - Prior to an individual being allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse, an assessment will take place by the Home Office using a suitability criteria.

Should an individual be allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse and information comes to light meaning they are no longer suitable, their case will be reviewed, and alternative suitable accommodation will be allocated under existing arrangements.

The Service Provider has responsibility to notify the Home Office of any change in circumstances of those allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse. As part of the individual’s induction on site, they will be given Migrant Help’s number to report any issues or concerns, including the suitability of the accommodation.

306 - Those housed in asylum accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse will not be considered for relocation to Rwanda. There are no plans to use the Air strip for flights.

308 - To ensure the safety and wellbeing of those allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse, an assessment will take place by the Home Office prior to allocation using suitability criteria. The factors which are currently considered when assessing the suitability of individual asylum seekers to particular accommodation is set out in the policy guidance ‘Allocation of Accommodation’.

This policy guidance will be reviewed as part of any preparations to open asylum accommodation in Linton-on-Ouse.

305 - Those housed in asylum accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse will not be considered for relocation to Rwanda.

10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the proposed new asylum accommodation centre at RAF Linton-on-Ouse will be used to accommodate only those asylum seekers who have been deemed eligible to be sent to Rwanda under the UK and Rwanda Migration and Economic Development Partnership agreement.

307 - Prior to an individual being allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse, an assessment will take place by the Home Office using a suitability criteria.

Should an individual be allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse and information comes to light meaning they are no longer suitable, their case will be reviewed, and alternative suitable accommodation will be allocated under existing arrangements.

The Service Provider has responsibility to notify the Home Office of any change in circumstances of those allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse. As part of the individual’s induction on site, they will be given Migrant Help’s number to report any issues or concerns, including the suitability of the accommodation.

306 - Those housed in asylum accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse will not be considered for relocation to Rwanda. There are no plans to use the Air strip for flights.

308 - To ensure the safety and wellbeing of those allocated accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse, an assessment will take place by the Home Office prior to allocation using suitability criteria. The factors which are currently considered when assessing the suitability of individual asylum seekers to particular accommodation is set out in the policy guidance ‘Allocation of Accommodation’.

This policy guidance will be reviewed as part of any preparations to open asylum accommodation in Linton-on-Ouse.

305 - Those housed in asylum accommodation at Linton-on-Ouse will not be considered for relocation to Rwanda.

10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what changes have been made to the criteria and process for determining whether a person is suitable to be accommodated at Napier Barracks since the High Court’s ruling in June 2021.

The suitability criteria was published in May 2021, and there have been no changes since publication.

The Home’s Office’s “Allocation of Accommodation” guidance (Allocation of accommodation policy (publishing.service.gov.uk) sets out a range of factors to be considered when assessing the suitability of individual asylum seekers to particular types of accommodation and includes specific guidance for the Napier site. A number of changes were introduced to the accommodation arrangements and other facilities at the site following the High Court judgment, generally aimed at more effectively managing Covid risks, better safeguarding arrangements, improvements in the living conditions and other facilities and clearer information to the residents on a range of matters, including that they are free to leave the site if they wish.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, where asylum seekers are sent once their claims for asylum are processed at Dungavel House Immigration Removal Centre.

We operate the immigration removal estate in a flexible manner and in line with the Short Term Holding Facility (STHF) Rules 2018 and the Detention Centre Rules 2001, as appropriate.

In order to support the management of the arrival of migrants by boat, we have temporarily accommodated people under the provisions of the STHF Rules 2018, in a small number of immigration removal centres (IRCs) including Dungavel House. Dungavel IRC is only considered when capacity is exceeded at other facilities, or contingencies are exhausted and has not been used for processing Channel migrants since November 2021.

Following initial processing and screening, asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute are able to access statutory support and accommodation from the Home Office in accordance with the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 whilst their application for asylum is being considered. Individuals who are eligible for such support are provided with transportation to asylum accommodation.

The Home Office publishes statistics on immigration detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. This includes data on people:

Data on those entering detention, by place of detention, relate to the place of initial detention. An individual who moves from one part of the detention estate to another will not be counted as entering any subsequent place of detention.

Last place of detention does not show where an individual spent their time in detention. In some cases, an individual may have spent a period of time detained elsewhere before being moved to their last place of detention.

Asylum-related cases refer to those where there has been an asylum claim at some stage prior or during detention. This will include asylum seekers whose asylum claims have been refused, and who have exhausted any rights of appeal, those returned under third country provisions, as well as those granted asylum/protection, but detained for other reasons (such as criminality).

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has for the continued use of Dungavel House Immigration Removal Centre for the processing of clandestine arrivals by boat.

We operate the immigration removal estate in a flexible manner and in line with the Short Term Holding Facility (STHF) Rules 2018 and the Detention Centre Rules 2001, as appropriate.

In order to support the management of the arrival of migrants by boat, we have temporarily accommodated people under the provisions of the STHF Rules 2018, in a small number of immigration removal centres (IRCs) including Dungavel House. Dungavel IRC is only considered when capacity is exceeded at other facilities, or contingencies are exhausted and has not been used for processing Channel migrants since November 2021.

Following initial processing and screening, asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute are able to access statutory support and accommodation from the Home Office in accordance with the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 whilst their application for asylum is being considered. Individuals who are eligible for such support are provided with transportation to asylum accommodation.

The Home Office publishes statistics on immigration detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. This includes data on people:

Data on those entering detention, by place of detention, relate to the place of initial detention. An individual who moves from one part of the detention estate to another will not be counted as entering any subsequent place of detention.

Last place of detention does not show where an individual spent their time in detention. In some cases, an individual may have spent a period of time detained elsewhere before being moved to their last place of detention.

Asylum-related cases refer to those where there has been an asylum claim at some stage prior or during detention. This will include asylum seekers whose asylum claims have been refused, and who have exhausted any rights of appeal, those returned under third country provisions, as well as those granted asylum/protection, but detained for other reasons (such as criminality).

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers detained for arriving in the UK by boat have been transported to Dungavel House Immigration Removal Centre as of 1 April 2022.

We operate the immigration removal estate in a flexible manner and in line with the Short Term Holding Facility (STHF) Rules 2018 and the Detention Centre Rules 2001, as appropriate.

In order to support the management of the arrival of migrants by boat, we have temporarily accommodated people under the provisions of the STHF Rules 2018, in a small number of immigration removal centres (IRCs) including Dungavel House. Dungavel IRC is only considered when capacity is exceeded at other facilities, or contingencies are exhausted and has not been used for processing Channel migrants since November 2021.

Following initial processing and screening, asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute are able to access statutory support and accommodation from the Home Office in accordance with the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 whilst their application for asylum is being considered. Individuals who are eligible for such support are provided with transportation to asylum accommodation.

The Home Office publishes statistics on immigration detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. This includes data on people:

Data on those entering detention, by place of detention, relate to the place of initial detention. An individual who moves from one part of the detention estate to another will not be counted as entering any subsequent place of detention.

Last place of detention does not show where an individual spent their time in detention. In some cases, an individual may have spent a period of time detained elsewhere before being moved to their last place of detention.

Asylum-related cases refer to those where there has been an asylum claim at some stage prior or during detention. This will include asylum seekers whose asylum claims have been refused, and who have exhausted any rights of appeal, those returned under third country provisions, as well as those granted asylum/protection, but detained for other reasons (such as criminality).

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 11 February 2022 to Question 117802 on Asylum: Mental Illness, what the (a) role and (b) membership of the National Asylum Seeker Health Steering Group is; and what steps she is taking to help ensure that the mental health needs of asylum seekers are met.

On 25 June the Home Office and the Department for Health and Social Care established an officials-led National Asylum Seeker Steering Group (NASHSG). The group brings together experts from across the health and immigration sectors, including NGOs and devolved administrations, to consider the specific health and wellbeing needs, barriers and solutions for people seeking asylum status in the UK, with the aim of implementing the recommendations of the Safeguarding Adults National Network, ‘The Health, Wellbeing and Safeguarding Needs of Individuals Seeking Asylum’ report.

In addition, to address asylum seeker mental health needs, in September 2021 we allocated just over £1 million in grant funding to four projects running from the beginning of October 2021 until the end of March 2022. This was open to bids from local authorities, civil society organisations and strategic migration partnerships and the following four bidders were successful:

- Groundwork London

- Solace

- Barnardo’s

- Refugee Council

This work covers virtual and in-person support, direct trauma counselling, trauma informed and culturally responsive training for both front line staff and those delivering mental health services. Additionally, we have ensured a champion’s model that organisations can deploy to enhance access to appropriate therapeutic services for asylum seekers.

22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the cost to the public purse has been for private contractors to manage and run Napier Barracks to date.

Costs are subject to change depending on numbers being accommodated within the asylum system. Accommodation costs are considered to be commercially confidential, therefore the Home Office does not publish this information. However, total expenditure on asylum is published in the Home Office Annual Report and Accounts, available at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ho-annual-reports-and-accounts

22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department will set annual resettlement targets as part of the Emergency Resettlement Mechanism.

The Government will pilot an Emergency Resettlement Mechanism to provide urgent protection in exceptional circumstances to refugees referred by UNHCR as in need of rapid emergency resettlement.

The successful emergency evacuation of approximately 15,000 people from Afghanistan to the UK has significantly increased demand on available local authority housing and support. As a direct result, the commencement of the pilot has been put on hold temporarily.

22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress she has made on delivering the Emergency Resettlement Mechanism; and on what date that programme will open.

The Government will pilot an Emergency Resettlement Mechanism to provide urgent protection in exceptional circumstances to refugees referred by UNHCR as in need of rapid emergency resettlement.

The successful emergency evacuation of approximately 15,000 people from Afghanistan to the UK has significantly increased demand on available local authority housing and support. As a direct result, the commencement of the pilot has been put on hold temporarily.

22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) asylum seekers and (b) migrants the Home Office plans to accommodate in Manston Barracks.

Manston consists of a variety of different accommodation facilities. These will be managed dynamically depending on numbers of arrivals, the makeup of those arrivals and the availability of onward accommodation.

22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much was paid to Cushman and Wakefield to draft the planning statement on Napier Barracks.

Accommodation costs including costs associated with the provision of goods and services related to accommodation are considered to be commercially confidential, therefore the Home Office does not publish this information. However, total expenditure on asylum is published in the Home Office Annual Report and Accounts, available at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ho-annual-reports-and-accounts.

22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she will exclude children from transfer to her proposed offshore asylum processing centres.

The Government has made our position clear on this during committee and report stage for the Nationality and Borders Bill. To be definitive about exemptions from proposed offshore asylum processing at this stage would not only hamper its potential to be effective but also incentivise people smugglers to target the most vulnerable. This policy, alongside a suite of other critical measures, is designed to deter individuals from making dangerous and unnecessary journeys from safe countries, removing demand for organised criminal gangs operating small boats routes and avoid further tragedies in the English Channel.

Every removal will be in line with our domestic and international obligations. People in scope for removal will be able to rely on their rights under Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights so as not to be transferred to a country where they would genuinely be at risk of inhuman and degrading treatment.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to publish the Home Office planning consultation for Napier Barracks from January 2022; and how the submissions on that matter will be used by her Department.

A public consultation on the Special Development Order concluded on 30 January 2022. Responses will be considered in due course.

Discussions are still ongoing regarding how submissions will be utilised by the Home Office.

9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people applied for UK asylum while in immigration detention in 2021.

The Home Office publishes statistics on people entering, leaving and in detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. This data is broken down by asylum and non-asylum related detainees and are published in table Det_01 of the ‘Detention summary tables’.

“Asylum-related detainees” relates to detainees who have claimed asylum at some point, not just while in detention and also includes failed asylum seekers as well as those with open claims. The data therefore is not a direct count of people who applied for asylum while in detention.

Data on people leaving detention while their asylum claim is considered are included in the ‘Bailed (Secretary of State or SoS)’ category and are published in table Det_04a of the ‘Detention summary tables’ with the latest data being for the year ending September 2021. However, this does not specify when the asylum claim was raised.

The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

Figures to the end of December 2021, will be published on 24 February 2022.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many new asylum applications were submitted by individuals who had previously been refused asylum in the UK in 2021.

(121813) Our records indicate that a total of 6,760 Further Submissions in support of fresh applications for asylum were lodged in the United Kingdom in 2021.

(121814) The five most common nationalities that lodged Further Submissions in support of fresh applications for asylum in the United Kingdom in 2021 were:

Iraq

1,179

Afghanistan

921

Pakistan

519

Iran

497

China

455

9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, (a) what the five most common nationalities of asylum applicants making fresh claims to the UK in 2021 were and (b) how many fresh asylum applications were received by the UK from nationals of each of those five countries in 2021.

(121813) Our records indicate that a total of 6,760 Further Submissions in support of fresh applications for asylum were lodged in the United Kingdom in 2021.

(121814) The five most common nationalities that lodged Further Submissions in support of fresh applications for asylum in the United Kingdom in 2021 were:

Iraq

1,179

Afghanistan

921

Pakistan

519

Iran

497

China

455

24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of fully devolving drug policy to the Scottish Government.

The Government has no plans to devolve powers on drug policy, such as the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971, to the Scottish Government and has made no assessment of the merits or demerits of doing so. While the legal framework on the misuse of drugs is reserved to the UK, the Scottish Government has its own approach to tackling drug misuse in areas where responsibility is devolved, including healthcare, criminal justice, housing and education.

Tackling drug misuse is a priority for this government and it is clear that action is needed across the country to reduce the harms caused. We are committed to working closely with the Scottish Government on this issue to improve the particular challenges of drug abuse in Scotland.

24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has any plans to devolve powers on drug policy to the Scottish Parliament.

The Government has no plans to devolve powers on drug policy, such as the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971, to the Scottish Government and has made no assessment of the merits or demerits of doing so. While the legal framework on the misuse of drugs is reserved to the UK, the Scottish Government has its own approach to tackling drug misuse in areas where responsibility is devolved, including healthcare, criminal justice, housing and education.

Tackling drug misuse is a priority for this government and it is clear that action is needed across the country to reduce the harms caused. We are committed to working closely with the Scottish Government on this issue to improve the particular challenges of drug abuse in Scotland.

13th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the safe and legal routes to the UK which are available to (a) refugees and (b) asylum seekers as of 13 January 2022.

The UK has a long history of supporting refugees in need of protection. Our resettlement schemes have provided safe and legal routes for tens of thousands of people to start new lives in the UK. Since 2015 we have resettled over 26,000 refugees through our safe and legal routes directly from regions of conflict and instability.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) commenced on 6th January and will provide up to 20,000 women, children and others at risk with a safe and legal route to resettle in the UK.

In addition to our resettlement schemes, we also operate the following safe and legal routes:

  • Refugee family reunion, which enables the spouse or partner and children of a refugee sponsor who are under 18 years of age to join their family member in the UK. More than 39,500 family reunion visas have been granted since 2015
  • Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy (ARAP), for current or former locally employed Afghan staff working for or alongside the UK Government. We have relocated over 8,000 people under ARAP so far, with more continuing to arrive.
  • A bespoke immigration route for British National (Overseas) status holders and their family members, which reflects the UK’s historic and moral commitment to people affected by the restrictions on their rights and freedoms in Hong Kong. As of 30 September 2021, there have been approximately 88,800 applications, with 76,176 successful grants since the route launched on 31 January.
  • =

Our New Plan for Immigration demonstrates a strengthening of Government-backed safe and legal routes to the UK, so those in need of protection don’t have to put their lives in the hands of people smugglers.

You can find more information on our safe and legal routes at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nationality-and-borders-bill-safe-and-legal-routes-factsheet/nationality-and-borders-bill-factsheet-safe-and-legal-routes

23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to publish its consultation on possible changes to asylum support entitlement, via commencing provisions within Immigration Act 2016; whether officials in her Department have engaged with representatives of local and devolved governments in respect of its plans during 2021; and whether her Department has prepared an equalities impact assessment on those plans.

The Home Office plans to consult on the implementation of the support provisions of the Immigration Act 2016 later this year. There will be engagement with representatives of local and devolved governments as part of the process.

An equalities impact assessment was completed at the time the measures were considered by Parliament in 2015 and this will be updated in light of the consultation.

23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the total cost of asylum support expended on people issued with a Notice of Intent (Inadmissible) is since 1 January 2021.

The cost of support expended on people issued with a Notice of Intent could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have arrived under the Afghan Citizens’ Resettlement Scheme to date.

Through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS), the UK will relocate up to 20,000 people at risk, including women and girls and minority groups, so they can rebuild their lives in safety.

The scheme is not yet open. However, the first to be resettled through this scheme will be those who arrived in the UK under the evacuation programme, which included individuals who were considered to be at particular risk – including women’s rights activists, prosecutors and journalists.

We are working urgently to open the scheme, amid the complex and changing picture. We are working closely across government and with NGOs, charities, local authorities and civil society groups to ensure support is provided to people who are resettled through this route.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which local authorities have expressed a willingness to accommodate Afghans arriving under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy or Afghan Citizens' Resettlement Scheme; how many local authorities have offered accommodation; and how many accommodation units have been offered to date.

We continue to work with local authorities to source appropriate accommodation as quickly as possible for Afghan families who were evacuated to the UK. So far, over 300 local authorities across the UK have offered to house Afghan families. We would strongly urge every council across the country to contribute to this national effort. We are working across government and with local authorities to realise appropriate accommodation opportunities to meet the demands of this urgent national response.

There are around 11,000 individuals accommodated in bridging hotels across the UK who had been evacuated as part of Operation Pitting.

The Afghan Citizens’ Resettlement Scheme has not yet opened, however, we publish statistics on resettlement by local authority at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many hotels are being used across the UK to accommodate Afghans under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy or Afghan citizens' resettlement scheme; how many people are residing in those hotels as at 23 September 2021; and what regions, as defined in asylum accommodation contracts, those hotels are in.

We continue to work with local authorities to source appropriate accommodation as quickly as possible for Afghan families who were evacuated to the UK. So far, over 300 local authorities across the UK have offered to house Afghan families. We would strongly urge every council across the country to contribute to this national effort. We are working across government and with local authorities to realise appropriate accommodation opportunities to meet the demands of this urgent national response.

There are around 11,000 individuals accommodated in bridging hotels across the UK who had been evacuated as part of Operation Pitting.

The Afghan Citizens’ Resettlement Scheme has not yet opened, however, we publish statistics on resettlement by local authority at Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to commence specific sections within Part 2 of the Nationality Immigration and Asylum Act 2002.

The New Plan for Immigration, published by the Home Office on 24 March 2021, included plans to set up Reception Centres to provide basic accommodation for asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute.

As part of these plans consideration is being given to commencing some of the measures set out in the Nationality Immigration and Asylum 2002 which relate to supporting asylum seekers in accommodation centres.

The locations for accommodation centres have not yet been determined. Any proposals to establish accommodation centres in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland would be discussed with the devolved governments.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to consult Ministers in the devolved Administrations before making any arrangements for the provision of accommodation centres in their respective nations (a) pursuant to s16 Nationality Immigration Act 2002 and (b) generally.

The New Plan for Immigration, published by the Home Office on 24 March 2021, included plans to set up Reception Centres to provide basic accommodation for asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute.

As part of these plans consideration is being given to commencing some of the measures set out in the Nationality Immigration and Asylum 2002 which relate to supporting asylum seekers in accommodation centres.

The locations for accommodation centres have not yet been determined. Any proposals to establish accommodation centres in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland would be discussed with the devolved governments.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government’s immigration returns agreement with Afghanistan is no longer valid.

Enforced returns to Afghanistan have been paused

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether it is her policy that (a) no Afghan nationals in the UK asylum procedure shall be returned to Afghanistan and (b) no Afghans on asylum support will be subject to negative cessations decisions or evictions.

Enforced returns to Afghanistan have been paused.

Afghan nationals who have an asylum claim or appeal that has not yet been decided are eligible to receive support under section 95 of the 1999 Act if they would otherwise be destitute. Furthermore, failed asylum seekers may be supported under section 4(2) of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 (1999 Act) if they would otherwise be destitute and meet other conditions set out in the Immigration and Asylum (Provision of Accommodation to Failed Asylum-

Failed asylum seekers who consider that they would be at risk of harm on return to Afghanistan because of the recent changes in the country are able to lodge further asylum submissions and would therefore be eligible to receive support under Regulation 3(2)(e) of the 2005 Regulations, subject to meeting the destitution criteria.

There are no plans to change the policy so that Afghans may not be evicted from accommodation provided under section 95 or 4(2) in any circumstances. Like others supported under the provisions, their support may be discontinued in a number of circumstances, including where it appears they are no longer destitute, where they are no longer living in the accommodation provided to them and where they are granted refugee status and therefore become eligible to take up employment or apply for mainstream benefits.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to institute an expedited asylum decisions process for Afghan nationals who have applied for asylum in the UK whose claim is (a) still outstanding or (b) subject to further review; and if she will make a statement.

The UK has a proud history of providing protection to those who need it, in accordance with our international obligations.

All asylum claims are considered on a case by case basis and in line with published policy.

We are currently reviewing the country situation and will issue updated country policy and information notes shortly for Afghanistan, which reflect revised assessments of risk of persecution. We have therefore temporarily paused asylum decision making for Afghan nationals to ensure our decision makers are only considering claimants’ protection needs in the light of relevant and up-to-date country information.

All asylum appeals from Afghan nationals will be reviewed ahead of any hearing to look at the individual claim in light of the changed country situation, current guidance and any further information submitted by the claimant, to assess whether the decision to refuse is still appropriate.

No one who is found to be at risk of persecution or serious harm in Afghanistan will be expected to return there. Enforced returns of those who have been refused asylum and have exhausted all rights of appeal are currently paused.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, under what circumstances and asylum support provision persons issued with a Notice of Intent are being supported.

An asylum seeker who receives a “notice of intent” stating their asylum claim may be treated as inadmissible, is eligible to receive support under section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 if they would otherwise be destitute.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of the 4,561 persons who received a Notice of Intent in the period 1 January 2021 to 30 June 2021 have been moved into the substantive asylum process and had their claim registered.

The latest published Immigration Statistics detail inadmissibility decisions made and can be found online at:

How many people do we grant asylum or protection to? - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

A breakdown of these figures into nationality and gender is not currently available.

Quarterly statistics relating to the period between June and September 2021 are due to be published on 25 November. We are working to bring data in respect of the six month long-stop in line with current reporting and hope to publish this information in the same timeframe.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of the 4,561 persons by (a) sex and (b) nationality received a Notice of Intent in the period 1 January 2021 to 30 June 2021.

The latest published Immigration Statistics detail inadmissibility decisions made and can be found online at:

How many people do we grant asylum or protection to? - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

A breakdown of these figures into nationality and gender is not currently available.

Quarterly statistics relating to the period between June and September 2021 are due to be published on 25 November. We are working to bring data in respect of the six month long-stop in line with current reporting and hope to publish this information in the same timeframe.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to bring into force (a) sections 27-31 or (b) sections 36 of the Nationality Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 in respect of accommodation centres for persons in the UK who seek to or have registered asylum claims.

The New Plan for Immigration published by the Home Office included plans to set up Reception Centres to provide basic accommodation for asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute.

As part of these plans consideration is being given to commencing some of the measures set out in the Nationality Immigration and Asylum 2002 which relate to supporting asylum seekers in accommodation centres.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish a new Country information and policy note on Afghanistan.

We aim to publish a new country policy and information note as soon as possible.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, under what powers people issued with a Notice of Intent pursuant to her Department's guidance on inadmissibility: safe third country cases are being (a) accommodated and (b) supported.

If an individual would otherwise be destitute, they would be eligible to be provided with accommodation and support to cover their essential living needs under sections 95 or 98 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people (a) in 2019, (b) in 2020 and (c) since 1 January 2021 to date have been issued with a Notice of Intent under the Government's guidance on inadmissibility: safe third country cases.

Figures on the number of asylum application decisions made in the first quarter of 2021 are due to be published on 27 May 2021. We are working to bring inadmissibility data in line with current reporting and hope to publish that information in the same timeframe.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to engage with devolved Administrations on the New Plan for Immigration; and whether the outcomes of that engagement will inform the public consultation which closed on 6 May 2021.

The NPI consultation was open to people and organisations across the UK to share their views

The Home Office will consider responses to the consultation carefully, including the method for reporting on its findings, in line with our duties as the policy develops in this area

In relation to the devolved Administrations, efforts were made to meet with officials to discuss the plan however the invitations were declined as the devolved authorities did not feel able to meet with the Home Office. Further attempts to engage the devolved Administrations will continue.

18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she consulted current asylum accommodation or asylum advice contractors prior to and in respect of the New Plan for Immigration being published on 24 March 2021.

The Government undertook a comprehensive consultation and engagement process on the New Plan for Immigration when the proposals were published, and providers of accommodation and advice services for asylum seekers have the opportunity to submit their views, in the same way as others. The consultation closed on the 6 May and we will carefully consider the outcome. Providers will be involved in the work to implement any changes.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to commence the remainder of Part 2 Nationality Immigration and Asylum Act 2002, to give effect to the reception centres proposed in the UK government’s New Plan for Immigration, published on 24 March 2021.

The UK Government is considering options for how this proposal could be given effect.

One option for implementing the plans is to commence some or all of the provisions in the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 which relate to Accommodation Centres.

8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding she has allocated to refugee resettlement for 2021-22.

The first 12 months of a refugee's resettlement costs are funded by central government using the Official Development Assistance budget which amounts to £8,520 per person. For years 2-5 local authorities receive £12,000 per person overall; tapering from £5,000 in year 2, to £3,700 in year 3, to £2,300 in year 4 and £1,000 in year 5. Funding is also made available for healthcare, education, and to help local authorities with exceptional costs such as social care and housing adaptations.

This tariff funding will be made available to all local authorities who resettle refugees during 2021-22. The number of refugees resettled next year will be dependent on local authority capacity as we recover from the pandemic.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the five most common nationalities of new asylum applicants making claims to the UK in 2020 were; and how many asylum applications were received by the UK from nationals of each of those five countries.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum applications in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of asylum applications lodged in the UK by the top 20 nationalities are published in table Asy_01c of the asylum and resettlement summary tables, which include a breakdown for year of application.

The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on asylum and resettlement

The latest data relate up to year ending December 2020.
Additionally, the Home Office publishes further data on asylum applications in Asy_D01 of the detailed asylum and resettlement datasets.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people applied for asylum from detention in the UK in 2020.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum claims made at ports of entry or “in country” and the latest figures can be found in table Asy_D01 within the Asylum and Resettlement datasets published on gov.uk. We do not publish further detail on the location of where an asylum claim is made as this is not held centrally on Home Office databases and could only be determined at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fresh asylum applications were submitted in 2020 by individuals who had previously been refused asylum in the UK.

Home Office records indicate that a total of 7,341 Further Submissions in support of fresh asylum/protection claims were submitted in 2020 by individuals who had previously been refused asylum in the UK.

Where people who have previously been refused asylum in the UK wish to make representations in support of a fresh asylum application these are recorded as Further Submissions.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many complaints her Department has received on the time taken to produce biometrics residence permits in the last three years.

While a delay in receiving the Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) may make accessing public services more difficult for all customers, since 20 January 2021 the standard pre-delivery email to customers has included their BRP number and guidance on how to use the online right to work and right to rent services to prove their entitlements.

We are also investigating the possibility of including National Insurance Numbers in the same message to further assist customers.

Data relating to correspondence performance is published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/customer-service-operations-data-november-2020

We are currently unable to break this down into complaints specifically related to BRP delays.

UVKI does not hold figures relating to the number of customers who have waited longer than 10 working days to receive their BRP after a positive decision between 2018 and 2020.

However, it does have service level agreements with its production provider the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA) and its secure delivery provider FedEx which took over the contract in February 2020. Prior to this, DX held the contract.

The DVLA has a target of producing 90% of BRPs within 24 hours of receiving the production request and 100% within 48 hours. It achieved the following:

Financial Year

24 hour target

48 hour target

Outside of 48 hours

2018/19

96.8%

99.4%

0.6%

2019/20

93.9%

100.00

0

2020/21 (to 5/2/21)

72.4%

97.4%

2.6%

FedEx and DX both had a target to attempt first delivery for 99% of BRPs within 48 working hours of collection of the BRP from DVLA.

DX consistently met this target during the years it had responsibility for the contract. For financial year 2020 to end December 2020 FedEx were achieving 94.4%. UKVI is working closely with FedEx to improve this performance and an improvement plan is in place to achieve this.

10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UKVI applicants have waited longer than the estimated 10 days to receive their biometrics residence permit after a positive decision in (a) 2018, (b) 2019 and (c) 2020.

While a delay in receiving the Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) may make accessing public services more difficult for all customers, since 20 January 2021 the standard pre-delivery email to customers has included their BRP number and guidance on how to use the online right to work and right to rent services to prove their entitlements.

We are also investigating the possibility of including National Insurance Numbers in the same message to further assist customers.

Data relating to correspondence performance is published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/customer-service-operations-data-november-2020

We are currently unable to break this down into complaints specifically related to BRP delays.

UVKI does not hold figures relating to the number of customers who have waited longer than 10 working days to receive their BRP after a positive decision between 2018 and 2020.

However, it does have service level agreements with its production provider the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA) and its secure delivery provider FedEx which took over the contract in February 2020. Prior to this, DX held the contract.

The DVLA has a target of producing 90% of BRPs within 24 hours of receiving the production request and 100% within 48 hours. It achieved the following:

Financial Year

24 hour target

48 hour target

Outside of 48 hours

2018/19

96.8%

99.4%

0.6%

2019/20

93.9%

100.00

0

2020/21 (to 5/2/21)

72.4%

97.4%

2.6%

FedEx and DX both had a target to attempt first delivery for 99% of BRPs within 48 working hours of collection of the BRP from DVLA.

DX consistently met this target during the years it had responsibility for the contract. For financial year 2020 to end December 2020 FedEx were achieving 94.4%. UKVI is working closely with FedEx to improve this performance and an improvement plan is in place to achieve this.

10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on refugees of delays in the delivery of a biometrics residence permit after gaining a positive decision.

While a delay in receiving the Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) may make accessing public services more difficult for all customers, since 20 January 2021 the standard pre-delivery email to customers has included their BRP number and guidance on how to use the online right to work and right to rent services to prove their entitlements.

We are also investigating the possibility of including National Insurance Numbers in the same message to further assist customers.

Data relating to correspondence performance is published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/customer-service-operations-data-november-2020

We are currently unable to break this down into complaints specifically related to BRP delays.

UVKI does not hold figures relating to the number of customers who have waited longer than 10 working days to receive their BRP after a positive decision between 2018 and 2020.

However, it does have service level agreements with its production provider the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA) and its secure delivery provider FedEx which took over the contract in February 2020. Prior to this, DX held the contract.

The DVLA has a target of producing 90% of BRPs within 24 hours of receiving the production request and 100% within 48 hours. It achieved the following:

Financial Year

24 hour target

48 hour target

Outside of 48 hours

2018/19

96.8%

99.4%

0.6%

2019/20

93.9%

100.00

0

2020/21 (to 5/2/21)

72.4%

97.4%

2.6%

FedEx and DX both had a target to attempt first delivery for 99% of BRPs within 48 working hours of collection of the BRP from DVLA.

DX consistently met this target during the years it had responsibility for the contract. For financial year 2020 to end December 2020 FedEx were achieving 94.4%. UKVI is working closely with FedEx to improve this performance and an improvement plan is in place to achieve this.

10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UKVI applications have had an official positive decision implemented at a different time from family members under the same application in (a) 2018, (b) 2019 and (c) in 2020.

The Home Office are unable to state how many UKVI applications have had an official positive decision implemented at a different time from family members under the same application in 2018, 2019 and 2020 as this information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Asylum claims may include one or more family members who are accepted as dependant on the principal applicants claim. It is important to fully consider all the evidence available, including that provided by dependants or other family members who have made claims in their own right, and to recognise protection issues which may arise in the family context when considering such claims.

Dependants of an asylum applicant who have been included in the initial asylum claim will, if the principal applicant is granted Asylum, HP, Family or Private Life leave to remain (LTR) or Discretionary Leave, normally be granted leave of the same duration and status as the principal applicant

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Afghan people under which schemes his Department plans to transfer from Pakistan in the next 12 weeks.

Many factors govern the flow of relocation, but we are grateful to the Government of Pakistan for their support on this important matter and we are endeavouring to bring as many eligible Afghans as possible to the UK, as quickly as possible.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answers of 23 September 2022 to Question 51747 and of 1 November 2022 to Question 69851, whether he expects the Bill of Rights to return to the House as introduced on at First Reading.

This Government was elected with a manifesto commitment to ‘update the Human Rights Act... to ensure there is a proper balance between the rights of individuals, our vital national security and effective government’. The Government stands by this commitment.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to reform human rights law in the UK.

The Government is now looking again at the Bill of Rights Bill to ensure that it will deliver our objectives in this area as effectively as possible.

3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will extend the deadline for his Department's consultation, Human Rights Act Reform: A Modern Bill of Rights, in response to the delay in publishing a full easy read version of that document.

The publication of the easy-read version of our consultation on A Modern Bill of Rights was regrettably delayed due to issues with an external supplier. As a result of this, the Secretary of State has extended the deadline for responses by six weeks for those with needs for an easy-read or audio version of the consultation document. The new deadline for these responses is 19 April.

Ministry of Justice officials will be conducting focused engagement sessions with disability organisations to explore the proposals outlined in the consultation further. The Department will also complete a full Equalities Impact Assessment of any proposals taken forward.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)