Damian Collins Portrait

Damian Collins

Conservative - Folkestone and Hythe

Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee
12th Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
DCMS Sub-Committee on Disinformation
12th Mar 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee Sub-committee on the effectiveness and influence of the select committee system
13th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
12th Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
12th Jul 2017 - 12th Sep 2017
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
19th Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Liaison Committee (Commons)
19th Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Consolidation, &c., Bills (Joint Committee)
6th Dec 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Consolidation Bills (Joint Committee)
6th Dec 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 29th Oct 2012


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 27th October 2021
08:45
Draft Online Safety Bill (Joint Committee) - Oral evidence
Subject: Draft Online Safety Bill
27 Oct 2021, 8:45 a.m.
At 9.00am: Oral evidence
Maria Ressa - CEO at Rappler
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 27th October 2021
15:00
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 28th October 2021
09:30
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 28th October 2021
14:20
Draft Online Safety Bill (Joint Committee) - Oral evidence
Subject: Draft Online Safety Bill
28 Oct 2021, 2:20 p.m.
At 3.00pm: Oral evidence
Antigone Davies - Global Head of Safety at Facebook
Chris Yiu - Director of Public Policy Western Europe at Facebook
At 4.30pm: Oral evidence
Leslie Miller - Vice President, Government Affairs and Public Policy at YouTube
Markham C. Erickson - Vice President, Government Affairs and Public Policy at Google
At 6.00pm: Oral evidence
Nick Pickles - Director, Senior Director, Global Public Policy Strategy, Development and Partnerships, at Twitter
Dr Theo Bertram - Director of Government Relations, Europe at TikTok
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Monday 1st November 2021
14:00
Draft Online Safety Bill (Joint Committee) - Oral evidence
Subject: Draft Online Safety Bill
1 Nov 2021, 2 p.m.
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
Dame Melanie Dawes - Chief Executive at Ofcom
Richard Wronka - Director for Online Harms at Ofcom
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 3rd November 2021
14:00
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 4th November 2021
09:30
Draft Online Safety Bill (Joint Committee) - Oral evidence
Subject: Draft Online Safety Bill
4 Nov 2021, 9:30 a.m.
At 9.45am: Oral evidence
Rt Hon. Nadine Dorries - Secretary of State at Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Chris Philp MP - Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Minister for Tech and the Digital Economy) at Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Rt Hon. Damian Hinds - Minister of State (Minister for Security and Borders) at Home Office
View calendar
Division Votes
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 313 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 321 Noes - 220
Speeches
Tuesday 20th July 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill

The Nationality and Borders Bill is important and necessary legislation to address the growing problem of illegal entry into the …

Written Answers
Thursday 9th September 2021
Reservoirs: Kent
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the Inspecting Engineers recommendations …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 7th July 2014
Football Governance Bill 2014-15
A Bill to require professional and semi-professional football clubs in England to disclose the identity of their owners; to give …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 26th July 2021
1. Employment and earnings
Payments from Mace Media Ltd, Unit 3 & 4 Croxted Mews, 286/288 Croxted Road, London SE24 9DA:

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Damian Collins has voted in 301 divisions, and 5 times against the majority of their Party.

20 Jul 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Damian Collins voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 323 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 263 Noes - 326
17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Damian Collins voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
2 Jun 2020 - Proceedings during the Pandemic - View Vote Context
Damian Collins voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative Aye votes vs 240 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 185 Noes - 242
20 May 2020 - Liaison (Membership) - View Vote Context
Damian Collins voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative Aye votes vs 316 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 323
10 Mar 2020 - Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill - View Vote Context
Damian Collins voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 301 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 306
View All Damian Collins Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Nigel Huddleston (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
(15 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(11 debate interactions)
Chris Philp (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
(10 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(11 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(8 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(8 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Damian Collins's debates

Folkestone and Hythe Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Folkestone and Hythe signature proportion
Petition Open
224
of 9,218 signatures (2.43%)
Petition Open
1,190
of 106,614 signatures (1.12%)
Petition Open
111
of 37,348 signatures (0.30%)
Petition Open
209
of 77,544 signatures (0.27%)
Petitions with most Folkestone and Hythe signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

Bring in a law which enforces professional football clubs to have at least 51% fan ownership similar to how the Bundesliga operates this rule.

The Government should use the recently established fan led review of football to introduce an Independent Football Regulator in England to put fans back at the heart of our national game. This should happen by December 2021.

Football is a powerful tool of which allows a range of benefits such as employment, and other important aspects of life. Football can be associated with passion, emotion, excitement and dedication across the community. With Fans attending football games a range of economic benefits are there too.


Latest EDMs signed by Damian Collins

Damian Collins has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Damian Collins, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Damian Collins has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Damian Collins has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

6 Bills introduced by Damian Collins


A Bill to require professional and semi-professional football clubs in England to disclose the identity of their owners; to give the Football Association powers to block the ownership of a club by anyone whom they consider is not a fit and proper person; to require all creditors of a football club to be compensated equally should the club go into administration; to facilitate the raising by supporters’ organisations of the finance required to acquire a controlling stake in a football club; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 7th November 2014

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Monday 25th June 2018
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to reform the governance of football in England to make it more transparent and accountable; to ensure fair financial dealings between professional football clubs and their supporters; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Monday 24th June 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require professional and semi-professional football clubs in England to disclose the identity of their owners; to give the Football Association powers to block the ownership of a club by anyone whom they consider is not a fit and proper person; to require all creditors of a football club to be compensated equally should the club go into administration; to facilitate the raising by supporters’ organisations of the finance required to acquire a controlling stake in a football club; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Thursday 3rd April 2014

A bill to require a football club playing in the top four tiers of English and Scottish professional football to disclose the identity of its owner, the identity of the owner of its home playing ground, training ground, any intellectual property associated with the club or a third party stake in its players and the identities of outstanding creditors; to require all creditors of a football club to be compensated equally should the club go into administration; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Monday 25th June 2012
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

A Bill to require a football club playing in the top four tiers of English and Scottish professional football to disclose the identity of its owner, the identity of the owner of its home playing ground, training ground, any intellectual property associated with the club or a third party stake in its players and the identities of outstanding creditors; to require all creditors of a football club to be compensated equally should the club go into administration; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 13th March 2012

Damian Collins has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


46 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
25th Mar 2021
What assessment the Government has made of the effectiveness of the Defending Democracy programme as part of its plans to bring forward legislative proposals on online harms.

The Defending Democracy programme coordinates work and expertise across government work to safeguard the integrity and security of our democratic processes.

Through the Online Harms legislative proposals, the programme is making good progress against two of its strategic objectives: to encourage respect for open, fair and safe democratic participation; and to promote fact-based discourse.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Government has taken to prepare for trade with the EU after the end of the transition period.

The transition period will end on 31 December, and the Government made extensive preparations for the changes and opportunities that will come. We have set out a package of support for border infrastructure and the customs intermediaries sector, and provided extensive guidance to business at gov.uk/transition.

The Government has also intensified engagement with businesses, including through the Brexit Business Taskforce, and is running a major public information campaign which tells businesses and citizens the steps they need to take to prepare.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
3rd Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to establish a public warning system using mobile phone technology that includes native language options for residents and people visiting from overseas.

The Government is reviewing the opportunities of a mobile alerting capability to issue alerts to mobile devices. The Government recognises the need for messages to be easily understood by everyone receiving them.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
9th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish a response to the Competition and Markets Authority's final report of their market study into online platforms and digital advertising, published on 1 July 2020.

The Government is currently considering the recommendations of the Competition and Market Authority’s market study and will respond in due course.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions his Department has had with Ofcom on (a) Ofcom’s policy to incentivise Openreach to build full fibre infrastructure in areas deemed commercially uncompetitive and (b) the criteria Ofcom uses to define those areas as uncompetitive.

The department has regular conversations with Ofcom at both ministerial and official level about its work to regulate the telecoms market, including the Wholesale Fixed Telecoms Market Review. Ofcom has set out its findings and proposed regulatory approach from the review in its published consultation documents, which are available on its website.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when he plans to lay before Parliament the Age Appropriate Design Code for online services.

The Age Appropriate Design Code will play an important role in protecting children’s personal data online. The Data Protection Act requires that the Code is laid in Parliament as soon as reasonably practicable. Ministers are taking the necessary steps to lay the Code as soon as possible.

18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when the Counter Disinformation Unit on covid-19 became operational; how many full-time equivalent staff work in that unit; from which Departments those staff were recruited; and whether any new staff have been hired to work in that unit.

Whilst this cross-government counter-disinformation capability was recently stood up to support COVID-19 response efforts, existing structures have been monitoring for disinformation related to the disease as part of their ongoing work.

The capability is resourced full time through existing cross-government teams and there are no additional costs associated with it.

There are a number of organisations that have relevant capabilities and responsibilities which are brought together through this work. This includes existing teams in DCMS, the Home Office, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, the Cabinet Office and No10.

18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many cases of disinformation have been considered by the Counter Disinformation Unit on covid-19 to date; what action was taken in response to cases of disinformation by that unit; and if that unit will publish examples of identified cases of disinformation on covid-19.

It would not be appropriate to provide a running commentary on instances of misinformation or disinformation. We will address instances of misinformation or disinformation using the most appropriate mechanism. We are grateful for the work civil society and academica are doing to highlight and correct misinformation.


As Government one of the best things we can do is make sure that everyone has access to the correct information about the virus. As such, we are working with industry to support the introduction of systems and processes that promote authoritative sources of information. The Government’s public information campaign provides the latest and most accurate information about Covid-19.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children in the Folkestone and Hythe local authority area are in receipt of school food vouchers; and what the cost to the public purse is per month of providing that scheme in that area.

During this period, we are asking schools to support children who are eligible for and claiming benefits-related free school meals at home by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. Schools have continued to receive all their funding for benefits-related and universal infant free school meals. However, we recognise that providing meals and food parcels is not a practicable option for all schools. That is why on 31 March we launched a national voucher scheme as an alternative option, with costs covered by the Department for Education.

Schools are best placed to make decisions about the most appropriate arrangements for eligible pupils, and this can include food parcel arrangements, alternative voucher arrangements or provision through the national voucher scheme.

Edenred has reported that over £154 million worth of voucher codes has been redeemed into supermarket eGift cards by schools and families through the national voucher scheme as of Monday 15 June. Edenred has also reported that over 17,500 schools had placed orders for the scheme as of Tuesday 26 May. We do not collect data on the scheme at pupil level.

The number and proportion of students who qualify for free school meals is published in the ‘Schools, pupils and their characteristics’ publication and its underlying data files. We do not collect data at constituency level.

The 2019 publication is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2019.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the Inspecting Engineers recommendations relating to vegetation management on the Mill Leese embankment, made in the section 10 report, and section 12 statement, as set out in the Reservoirs Act 1975, following their most recent inspection of the Mill Leese Flood Storage Area at Saltwood in Kent.

In accordance with Reservoirs Act 1975 (Capacity, Registration, Prescribed Forms, etc) (England) Regulations 2013 (SI 2013/1677) and subsequent guidance produced by the UK Reservoir Safety Liaison Group (the National Protocol for the Handling, Transmission and Storage of Reservoir Information and Flood Maps), we are unable to publish the full content of the section 10 report and section 12 statement. I recognise the level of local interest in this matter, and the Environment Agency (EA) will disclose information regarding the planned works that it considers will be of benefit to interested members of the public.

The EA has heard from the community that redacted documents are unhelpful and do not contribute to building trust and cooperation. The EA will be visiting the site in mid-September and intends to openly communicate the legally required work proposed for the site.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the effect is of the provisions in Article 8.84 of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement, prohibiting restrictions on cross-border data flows including personal data, on data protection in the UK.

The United Kingdom is committed to maintaining high standards of protection for personal data, including when it is transferred across borders. Data provisions in Free Trade Agreements including the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) are separate but complementary to the United Kingdom’s adequacy process and international data protection frameworks.

Through CEPA, we have agreed to avoid unjustified restrictions on the free flow of data between the United Kingdom and Japan, and committed to maintaining a legal framework that provides for the protection of personal information. CEPA only addresses data flows between the United Kingdom and Japan and does not address onward transfers to other jurisdictions. The United Kingdom has not endorsed the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Cross Border Privacy Rules System (APEC CBPR).

Separately, the United Kingdom has preserved the effect of the EU's adequacy decision for Japan on a transitional basis. This does not permit the onward transfer of EU data using APEC CBPR.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what effect Article 8.84 of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement, enabling the free flow of data, has on the UK’s forthcoming adequacy decision for Japan to allow onward flows of data from Japan to their trade partners; and whether that decision will include the free flow of data from Japan to the US.

The United Kingdom is committed to maintaining high standards of protection for personal data, including when it is transferred across borders. Data provisions in Free Trade Agreements including the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) are separate but complementary to the United Kingdom’s adequacy process and international data protection frameworks.

Through CEPA, we have agreed to avoid unjustified restrictions on the free flow of data between the United Kingdom and Japan, and committed to maintaining a legal framework that provides for the protection of personal information. CEPA only addresses data flows between the United Kingdom and Japan and does not address onward transfers to other jurisdictions. The United Kingdom has not endorsed the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Cross Border Privacy Rules System (APEC CBPR).

Separately, the United Kingdom has preserved the effect of the EU's adequacy decision for Japan on a transitional basis. This does not permit the onward transfer of EU data using APEC CBPR.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what effect the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement has on transfers of data to (a) the US and (b) other countries within the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation Cross Border Privacy Rules System.

The United Kingdom is committed to maintaining high standards of protection for personal data, including when it is transferred across borders. Data provisions in Free Trade Agreements including the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) are separate but complementary to the United Kingdom’s adequacy process and international data protection frameworks.

Through CEPA, we have agreed to avoid unjustified restrictions on the free flow of data between the United Kingdom and Japan, and committed to maintaining a legal framework that provides for the protection of personal information. CEPA only addresses data flows between the United Kingdom and Japan and does not address onward transfers to other jurisdictions. The United Kingdom has not endorsed the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Cross Border Privacy Rules System (APEC CBPR).

Separately, the United Kingdom has preserved the effect of the EU's adequacy decision for Japan on a transitional basis. This does not permit the onward transfer of EU data using APEC CBPR.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the footnote to Article 8.80 (5) of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement, what effect the acceptance of the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation Cross Border Privacy Rules System under the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement will have on adequacy arrangements with the EU.

The United Kingdom is committed to maintaining high standards of protection for personal data, including when it is transferred across borders. Data provisions in Free Trade Agreements including the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) are separate but complementary to the United Kingdom’s adequacy process and international data protection frameworks.

Through CEPA, we have agreed to avoid unjustified restrictions on the free flow of data between the United Kingdom and Japan, and committed to maintaining a legal framework that provides for the protection of personal information. CEPA only addresses data flows between the United Kingdom and Japan and does not address onward transfers to other jurisdictions. The United Kingdom has not endorsed the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Cross Border Privacy Rules System (APEC CBPR).

Separately, the United Kingdom has preserved the effect of the EU's adequacy decision for Japan on a transitional basis. This does not permit the onward transfer of EU data using APEC CBPR.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to respond to the correspondence of 11 June 2019, 19 October 2019 and 25 June 2020 from the hon. Member for Folkestone and Hythe, regarding his constituent Mrs Old and the formerly proposed lorry park at Stanford West; and if he will make a statement.

There have been multiple replies sent regarding Mrs Old in the past twelve months. The Department will contact the Hon Member’s office and provide copies of any replies that you have not received. The Department has no record of any correspondence being received on 25th June; if a copy can be provided, a response will be sent as soon as possible.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to answer Named Day Question 88292, due for Answer on 15 September 2020.

We take parliamentary scrutiny incredibly seriously and it is fundamentally important that hon. Members are provided with accurate and timely information to enable them to hold Government to account. We are working rapidly to provide all hon. Members with accurate answers to their questions, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s questions will be answered as soon as possible.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what liability Amazon has in its data storage contracts with the NHS for loss of data or data breaches; and what the range of legal and financial liabilities is in contracts his Department has with other data storage suppliers.

As between the parties, the Government retains legal responsibility for any data breaches or loss of data under its contract with Amazon for data storage.

This is the main data storage contract for NHS Test and Trace. Any other data storage is acquired using Government frameworks which set out standard positions in relation to legal and financial remedies.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 2 June to Question 48387, for what reason the contract between NHS England and Palantir relating to the NHS data store has not yet been published.

The contract was released on 5 June 2020 and will be formally published in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the terms of reference of the (a) current and (b) former contracts between his Department or it's executive agencies and (i) Palantir and (ii) connected or subsidiary businesses of Palantir.

NHS England will be publishing the contract for the NHS Data Store with Palantir in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data has been made available by his Department to Palantir in relation to that company's contract with the NHS; and (a) where and (b) by whom that data is processed.

NHS England is the data controller for data processed in the NHS Data Store. Palantir is engaged by NHS England under contract as a data processor. As a data processor, the organisation only processes data under instruction from NHS England.

The NHS Data Store data list is found at the following link:

https://data.england.nhs.uk/covid-19/.

Data is Processed on the Foundry Platform which is hosted in the UK Region of Amazon Web Services.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what rights the Government has granted to Palantir through its contract with the NHS to (a) access the NHS's application programming interface (API), (b) access and use systems, programmes or software made available through that API, and (c) use, copy, cache, store and make backup and archival copies of tools and documentation related to that API.

NHS England has not made any application programming interfaces available to Palantir.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the NHS covid-19 contact tracing app is compatible with the Apple / Google contact tracing app in terms of (a) Bluetooth and (b) other functionality; and what discussions he is having with (i) Apple and (ii) Google on ensuring future changes to their app do not reduce any compatibility.

We continue to develop the National Health Service COVID-19 app and its compatibility with other apps. We are also in ongoing discussions with Apple and Google with regards to the app’s functionality.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which companies or organisations will process the analytics of the (a) inferred and (b) other data gathered by the NHS covid-19 contact tracing app; and whether that data will be held and processed in the UK under UK legislation.

Amazon Web Services, the engineering firm VMWare Tanzu, Google and Microsoft are all providing services necessary for the proper functioning of the app. Data may also be shared with NHS England and NHS Improvement. Where data is held outside of the United Kingdom it will be held within the European Economic Area. The contracts governing the arrangements with data processors contain standard clauses requiring compliance with the General Data Protection Regulation.

The data that app users have chosen to share with the National Health Service may be retained for research in the public interest, or by the NHS for planning and delivering services, in line with the law and on the basis of the necessary approvals required by law.

Data will be stored securely and processed in the UK. Information that does not, and cannot, identify you may be stored and processed outside of the UK (for example, information purely about the number of proximity alerts issued, or the number of outcomes from tests).

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the NHS covid-19 tracing app and in addition to the code for the app that has already been published, if he will publish (a) the code for the backend processing of data, (b) the third party data services to be used and (c) the administrative roles involving that data.

Alongside the source code for the app, we have already published documentation which sets out the full application and system architecture. The data protection impact assessment lists the data processors and their roles.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether NHSx will develop the functionality of the NHS covid-19 contact tracing app to allow users to order the deletion of the information they have submitted to the database, once the app itself is no longer required to tackle covid-19.

App users can delete the National Health Service COVID-19 app whenever they want. If users delete the app, all data stored on the phone and not already shared with the NHS would be deleted. If users do not opt to share their data, it will automatically be deleted on a continuous 28-day cycle within the app, on the phone.

Data shared with the NHS, either proactively or as part of requesting a test, may be retained in accordance with necessary legislation, and may be used in the future for research in the public interest, or by the NHS for planning and delivering services, subject to the necessary approvals required by law.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department has taken to support humanitarian relief for people affected by the conflict in Tigray in Ethiopia; and what recent discussions he has had with his Ethiopian counterpart on restoring peace to that region.

The UK is supporting life-saving assistance for people affected by the conflict in Tigray, including health and malnutrition treatment and water and sanitation delivered through UN agencies, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and NGO partners. We continue to work closely with the UN and partners, in calling for sustained, free and unfettered humanitarian access across Tigray, in line with the guiding principles laid down by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Since the Foreign Secretary met the Ethiopian Deputy Prime Minister/Foreign Minister in London on 25th November we have continued to press the Government of Ethiopia for a political solution to restore peace, including in my call with the Ethiopian Finance Minister on 16 December.

8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much in total is owed by football clubs playing in the English Football League to HMRC in overdue unpaid taxes.

Across the English Football League, including the Championship, League 1 and League 2, the total debt is £110,437,964 excluding VAT which was deferred from spring 2020 and is not due until 31 March 2021. The breakdown by league is:

Championship

£88,897,407

League 1

£16,601,127

League 2

£4,939,428

total debt

£110,437,964

20th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much in total is owed by football clubs playing in the English Football League to HMRC in overdue unpaid taxes.

The total of overdue taxes is £77,612,777 excluding VAT which is auto-deferred to 31 March 2021 and Month 6 PAYE payments.

This is broken down by league as:

Debt

Championship

£59,127,124

League 1

£13,637,069

League 2

£4,848,583

Total

£77,612,777

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the extent to which workers in the creative industries on short-term contracts qualify for payments under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme; and if he will make a statement.

Employees on fixed-term contracts, regardless of industry, can be claimed for under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme if otherwise eligible.

From 1 July an employee is eligible to be claimed for under the scheme, if their employer has previously submitted a claim for them in relation to a furlough period of at least three consecutive weeks taking place any time between 1 March 2020 and 30 June.

For an employee on a fixed term contract, the employer would have been able to re-employ them and put them on furlough as long as they did this by 10 June, and if either the employee’s contract expired on or after 28 February 2020 and an RTI payment submission for the employee was notified to HMRC on or before 28 February 2020, or the employee’s contract expired on or after 19 March 2020 and an RTI payment submission for the employee was notified to HMRC on or before 19 March 2020.

If the employee’s fixed term contract has not already expired, it can be extended, or renewed. Employers can claim for these employees as long as an RTI payment submission for the employee was notified to HMRC on or before 19 March 2020.

Employees that started and ended the same contract between 28 February 2020 and 19 March 2020 will not qualify for this scheme. This is not specific to employees on fixed-term contracts; the same would apply to employees on all other contracts.

3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what grounds EU member states are able to refuse an extradition request from the UK; and what provisions are in place to prevent people with UK convictions who have fled the UK to the EU escaping justice.

Under the UK-EU Trade and Co-operation Agreement a requested person cannot be surrendered if their fundamental rights are at risk, if extradition would be disproportionate or if they are likely to face long periods of pre-trial detention.   

Some EU Member States operate on the fundamental principle that they cannot extradite their citizens outside of the EU. In this context the provisions of the agreement provide for a path to justice in each case.

For example, where someone has been convicted in the UK, if they are arrested in their state of nationality, the authorities there can decide to enforce the sentence at home.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance her Department has received from Public Health England on policies for mitigating the spread of covid-19 amongst people living and working at the asylum seeker accommodation centre at Napier Barracks in Folkestone.

We are working closely with our providers, and with Public Health England, to ensure that all individuals who have to self-isolate can do so and are following all medical advice closely.

We take the welfare of those in our care extremely seriously and asylum seekers can contact the 24/7 helpline run by Migrant Help if they have any issues.

We do not publish the information requested, although the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets#asylum-support

At present the Home Office will continue to regularly move small numbers of people out of Napier barracks into Dispersal Accommodation in line with business as usual processes and will continue to route new people into Napier in line with public health guidance.

Those asylum seekers being moved to Dispersal Accommodation will not be moved to the other Ministry of Defence site currently in use (Penally Training Camp). This site is also providing temporary contingency accommodation for asylum seekers.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people who have applied for asylum in the UK (a) have been accommodated at Napier Barracks in Folkestone, (b) are currently being accommodated there; what the average length of stay has been; and whether asylum seekers who have not previously stayed at the Barracks will be accommodated there in the future.

We are working closely with our providers, and with Public Health England, to ensure that all individuals who have to self-isolate can do so and are following all medical advice closely.

We take the welfare of those in our care extremely seriously and asylum seekers can contact the 24/7 helpline run by Migrant Help if they have any issues.

We do not publish the information requested, although the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets#asylum-support

At present the Home Office will continue to regularly move small numbers of people out of Napier barracks into Dispersal Accommodation in line with business as usual processes and will continue to route new people into Napier in line with public health guidance.

Those asylum seekers being moved to Dispersal Accommodation will not be moved to the other Ministry of Defence site currently in use (Penally Training Camp). This site is also providing temporary contingency accommodation for asylum seekers.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of to Question 125990, when her Department plans to complete its review of files relating to Mr Paul Cleeland (a) in its possession or (b) transferred to the Criminal Case Review Commission; and if she will make a statement on the findings of that review.

Further to the answer provided to the Hon Member’s PQ 125990 on 10 December, the Home Office has searched its own holdings and files held by the CCRC are being transferred. These will be examined as soon as practicable and the Home Office will provide the Hon Member with an update on next steps. It would not be appropriate to comment further while legal proceedings are ongoing.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will allow the hon. Member for Folkestone and Hythe's constituent, Mr Paul Cleeland, to have access to her Department's files that have been placed with the Criminal Cases Review Commission relating to his conviction for the murder of Terry Clarke in 1972.

As stated in the answer provided to PQ 114151 on 18 November, a review of Home Office file holdings on this subject is ongoing. The Home Office will work with the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC) to review any Home Office material the CCRC holds concerning Mr Cleeland.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what date officials of her Department were notified of Mukhtar Ablyazov's asylum in France; and whether Mukhtar Ablyazov remains subject to an arrest warrant in the UK”.

The Home Office does not hold this information.

The Home Office is not informed when an individual is granted asylum in another country.

Arrest warrants are a matter for the police and the UK’s independent prosecution authorities. There is no Ministerial involvement.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason her Department asked Sir John May in 1991 to investigate the Metropolitan Police Science Laboratory; whether that work included an examination of the evidence presented by John McCafferty during the prosecution of Paul Cleeland for the murder of Terry Clarke in 1972; and if she will publish the results of those investigations.

A review of any Home Office file holdings on this subject is currently being undertaken. It would not be appropriate to comment further while legal proceedings are ongoing.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason (a) Sir John May investigated the conviction of Paul Cleeland for the murder of Terry Clarke in Stevenage in 1972 as part of his work for her Department on potential miscarriages of justice and failings in the use of forensic science to gather and present evidence in criminal cases and (b) Paul Cleeland was not informed of that investigation (i) when his case was considered by the Court of Appeal in 2002 and (ii) at any other time; and what the findings were of Sir John May's investigation in that case.

A review of any Home Office file holdings on this subject is currently being undertaken. It would not be appropriate to comment further while legal proceedings are ongoing.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many migrants have been intercepted (a) while attempting to make an illegal crossing of the English Channel and (b) shortly after arriving in the UK in each of the last 12 months for which that data is available.

People crossing the Channel to enter the UK have come from a safe country – usually France – and so there is no reason why they need to make this trip in order to claim asylum. Those fleeing persecution should stay in the first safe country they enter.

The UK continues to work closely with France and other countries to return migrants who have entered the UK by small boat in order to provide a strong deterrent against these dangerous crossings.

The number of migrants arriving in the UK crossing the Channel by small boats for the months of January to March 2020 is approx. 450. These are provisional figures based on operational management information. The figures for April have not passed through a data quality check and cannot be assured. The final figures for all months will be published at a later date, once they have been verified and fully quality assured.

Information regarding migrants crossing the English Channel was provided to the Home Affairs Select Committee on 5 March 2019 which gave the number of migrants detected entering the UK by small boats from January 2018 to February 2019 as 428.


On 22 July 2019 the then Home Secretary Sajid Javid provided an additional figure to Home Affairs Select Committee that up to 21 July 2019 725 migrants had crossed the English Channel.

Since January 2019, over 155 people who entered the UK illegally on small boats have been returned to Europe. However, as a result of COVID-19 the vast majority of EU member states have temporarily paused accepting returns under the Dublin Regulations, but we are tracking those individuals and where appropriate will seek to return them when routes are available.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many migrants have entered the UK in the last 12 months as a result of making an illegal crossing of the English Channel; and how many of those migrants have subsequently left the UK.

People crossing the Channel to enter the UK have come from a safe country – usually France – and so there is no reason why they need to make this trip in order to claim asylum. Those fleeing persecution should stay in the first safe country they enter.

The UK continues to work closely with France and other countries to return migrants who have entered the UK by small boat in order to provide a strong deterrent against these dangerous crossings.

The number of migrants arriving in the UK crossing the Channel by small boats for the months of January to March 2020 is approx. 450. These are provisional figures based on operational management information. The figures for April have not passed through a data quality check and cannot be assured. The final figures for all months will be published at a later date, once they have been verified and fully quality assured.

Information regarding migrants crossing the English Channel was provided to the Home Affairs Select Committee on 5 March 2019 which gave the number of migrants detected entering the UK by small boats from January 2018 to February 2019 as 428.


On 22 July 2019 the then Home Secretary Sajid Javid provided an additional figure to Home Affairs Select Committee that up to 21 July 2019 725 migrants had crossed the English Channel.

Since January 2019, over 155 people who entered the UK illegally on small boats have been returned to Europe. However, as a result of COVID-19 the vast majority of EU member states have temporarily paused accepting returns under the Dublin Regulations, but we are tracking those individuals and where appropriate will seek to return them when routes are available.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will provide details of the steps her Department is taking to detect migrants seeking to enter the UK by illegally crossing the English Channel.

Keeping our border secure is the Government’s highest priority and it is committed to doing everything it can to stop these dangerous Channel crossings which are putting vulnerable lives at risk.

Through joint-working with France, the UK has funded the continued deployment of gendarme reservists along the coast of northern France, who are patrolling constantly in order to detect attempted crossings by migrants. Funding has been allocated, among other projects, for further improvements at ports in northern France and on the ground, this now includes drones, specialist vehicles and detection equipment to stop small boats leaving European shores.

Intelligence flows are also key to dismantling the organised crime groups behind crossings. We have restructured and repurposed our approach to support the growing intelligence feeds which is used to inform and direct how and where resource is deployed.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the findings of any review that has been carried out by the Home Office, or other public authority within her responsibility, of criminal cases in which Mr John McCafferty was involved in providing forensic evidence for the prosecution.

I am not aware of any such reviews carried out by the Home Office.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to develop UK offensive and defensive cyber capabilities.

The Ministry of Defence has funded programmes to mitigate cyber risks against our platforms, weapon systems and core digital infrastructure. And building on the National Offensive Cyber Programme, the new National Cyber Force will design and deliver cyber operations, from supporting warfighting operations to countering serious crime and combatting terrorism.

We are developing a cyber-aware workforce to embed cyber security into our business and operations, and establishing a dedicated career stream for our most highly-skilled military cyber professionals for which various possible remunerative options are being explored.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether car repair garages are eligible for funding from Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has announced an unprecedented package of support for businesses to help with their ongoing business costs in recognition of the disruption caused by COVID-19. This package of support includes the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF).

Businesses in England that would have been in receipt of the Expanded Retail Discount (which covers retail, hospitality and leisure) on 11 March?with?a rateable value of less than £51,000 will be eligible for a RHLGF cash grant per property of either £10,000 or £25,000 depending on the rateable value of the property.

Guidance on the types of businesses covered by the Expanded Retail Discount can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/business-rates-retail-discount-guidance. It is for individual local billing authorities to adopt a local scheme and determine in each individual case when, having regard to this guidance, to grant relief. Any enquiries on eligibility for the Expanded Retail Discount and thus the RHLGF should be directed to the relevant local authority.

For more information on the RHLGF please visit: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/check-if-youre-eligible-for-the-coronavirus-retail-hospitality-and-leisure-grant-fund

In addition, on?1 May,?the Government announced that up to £617 million is being made available to local authorities?in England to allow them to provide discretionary grants. The?Local Authority Discretionary Grants Fund is aimed at small businesses with ongoing fixed property-related costs but are not liable for business rates or rates reliefs.

Businesses already in receipt of a Small Business grant or a Retail, Hospitality and Leisure grant are not eligible for this fund. Businesses who are eligible for or in receipt of the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) are now eligible to apply for this scheme.

Guidance, intended to support local authorities in administering the Discretionary Grants Fund, was published 13 May and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-business-support-grant-funding. Local authorities are responsible for developing their local scheme, having regard to this guidance, and decisions about which businesses to support, and the level of grant to award, are for local authorities to take.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the results of any review that has been carried out by the Criminal Cases Review Commission, or other public authority within his responsibility, of criminal cases in which Mr John McCafferty was involved in providing forensic evidence for the prosecution.

Section 23 of the Criminal Appeals Act 1995 prevents the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC) from disclosing any information obtained by the Commission in the exercise of any of their functions (specified exceptions do apply).

In line with legislation, following a Case Review the CCRC will provide all applicants with a Statement of Reasons, as to why the case was referred or not referred to the Court of Appeal.

The Ministry of Justice is not aware of any other reviews undertaken by other public authorities that concerned Mr McCafferty. Mr McCafferty previously worked for the Forensic Science Service (FSS). The FSS was a government owned company, sponsored by the Home Office, which was dissolved in 2012.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)