Ian Paisley Portrait

Ian Paisley

Democratic Unionist Party - North Antrim

First elected: 6th May 2010

Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Communities and Local Government)

(since May 2015)

Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Culture, Media and Sport)

(since May 2015)

Select Committees
Panel of Chairs (since January 2020)
Ballot Secrecy Bill [HL]
1st Mar 2023 - 7th Mar 2023
Equipment Theft (Prevention) Bill
25th Jan 2023 - 1st Feb 2023
Electricity and Gas Transmission (Compensation) Bill
23rd Jan 2023 - 25th Jan 2023
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 9th Jan 2023
Down Syndrome Bill
19th Jan 2022 - 26th Jan 2022
Motor Vehicles (Compulsory Insurance) Bill
15th Dec 2021 - 5th Jan 2022
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Panel of Chairs
22nd Jun 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Energy and Climate Change)
8th May 2015 - 8th Jun 2017
Panel of Chairs
11th Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Palace of Westminster (Joint Committee)
16th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 5th Dec 2016
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Work and Pensions)
6th May 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th May 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
26th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
House of Commons Governance Committee
16th Oct 2014 - 17th Dec 2014


Department Event
Thursday 18th April 2024
09:30
Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport
Oral questions - Main Chamber
18 Apr 2024, 9:30 a.m.
Culture, Media and Sport (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Motor Vehicles (Driving Licences) (Reform)
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 6 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 0 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 81
Speeches
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Ceasefire in Gaza
On 13 November, I had the honour of meeting Adi and Dvir Efrat, a mother and daughter kidnapped by Hamas …
Written Answers
Thursday 8th February 2024
Schools: Charities
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she is taking steps to encourage charity involvement in setting up …
Early Day Motions
Friday 26th January 2024
Michael Dunlop
That this House congratulates Michael Dunlop winning the King Of The Roads racing award at the Irish motorbike awards ceremony …
Bills
Tuesday 8th November 2022
Referendums (Supermajority) Bill 2022-23
A Bill to require a supermajority of votes in favour of a proposal for constitutional change on which a referendum …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 7th August 2023
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: R&A Championships Limited
Address of donor: Beach House, Golf Place, St Andrews KY16 9JA
Amount of donation …
EDM signed
Monday 4th December 2023
Teachers' pay in Northern Ireland
That this House notes the long-standing teachers and schools leaders pay dispute in Northern Ireland; stands with unions and their …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 18th July 2018
Access to Welfare (Terminal Illness Definition) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Ian Paisley has voted in 410 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

12 Oct 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Ian Paisley voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 7 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 332 Noes - 279
24 Jan 2023 - Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill - View Vote Context
Ian Paisley voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Democratic Unionist Party No votes vs 6 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 232 Noes - 296
View All Ian Paisley Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
(29 debate interactions)
Brandon Lewis (Conservative)
(23 debate interactions)
Penny Mordaunt (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(23 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Northern Ireland Office
(103 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(65 debate contributions)
Home Office
(49 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Ian Paisley's debates

North Antrim Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

As a teacher in 2018 I started a bed poverty charity, since then schools have referred 1400 children without beds. Bed poverty is affecting educational outcomes for children across the UK

A national sleep strategy must resource local authorities to identify, address and ultimately end bed poverty

Hundreds of thousands of people signed numerous petitions calling for actions that the Government has included in the Kept Animals Bill. The Government should urgently find time to allow the Bill to complete its journey through Parliament and become law.

As Parliament considers the Bill of Rights, the Government must reconsider including abortion rights in this Bill. Rights to abortion must be specifically protected in this legislation, especially as the Government has refused to rule out leaving the European Convention on Human Rights.

The Government should bring forward legislation to allow assisted dying for adults who are terminally ill and have mental capacity. It should be permitted subject to strict upfront safeguards, assessed by two doctors independently, and self-administered by the dying person.

The Government needs to change the law so laboratory animals are included in the Animal Welfare Act. Laboratory animals are currently not protected by the Act and are therefore victims of 'unnecessary suffering' (see section 4 of the Act: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2006/45/section/4).

Make it illegal for any employer to mandate vaccination for its employees. This should apply to all public sector (including the NHS, armed forces, care workers), third sector and all private sector.

Invest in FOP research to support this ultra-rare disease community. Research into FOP could inform the understanding/treatment of many more common conditions such as osteoporosis, hip replacements, DIPG (a rare childhood brain cancer) and many common military injuries.

Ensure Water companies treat the sewage they are responsible for. Not discharge it into rivers and water courses. After all what goes into the ocean comes back as the fish we eat.

We ask Parliament to repeal the High Speed Rail Bills, 2016 and 2019, as MPs voted on misleading environmental, financial and timetable information provided by the Dept of Transport and HS2 Ltd. It fails to address the conditions of the Paris Accord and costs have risen from £56bn to over £100bn.

Breed Specific Legislation fails to achieve what Parliament intended, to protect the public. It focuses on specific breeds, which fails to appreciate a dog is not aggressive purely on the basis of its breed. It allows seizure of other breeds, but the rules are not applied homogeneously by councils.

We want the Government to commit to not rolling out any e-vaccination status/immunity passport to the British public. Such passports could be used to restrict the rights of people who have refused a Covid-19 vaccine, which would be unacceptable.

Being the first to close and still no clue as to when we can open, this seasonal industry is losing its summer profits that allows them to get through the first quarter of next year.

Even if we are allowed to open in December, 1 months profit won't be enough to keep us open in 2021. We need help

The UK hospitality industry. Responsible for around 3m jobs, generating £130bn in activity, resulting in £38bn in taxation. Yet, unlike the Arts or Sports, we do not have a dedicated Minister.

We are asking that a Minister for Hospitality be created for the current, and successive governments.

Advice from the JCVI on the priority groups for a Covid-19 vaccine does not include school/childcare workers. This petition calls for these workers, who cannot distance or use PPE, to be kept safe at work by being put on the vaccine priority list when such a list is adopted into government policy.


Latest EDMs signed by Ian Paisley

26th January 2024
Ian Paisley signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Thursday 25th January 2024

Michael Dunlop

Tabled by: Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist Party - North Antrim)
That this House congratulates Michael Dunlop winning the King Of The Roads racing award at the Irish motorbike awards ceremony in Belfast; further congratulates Michael on his victories in a record number of road racing championships and as holder of one of the highest number of victories in the Isle …
4 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Conservative: 1
26th January 2024
Ian Paisley signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Thursday 25th January 2024

Glenn Irwin

Tabled by: Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist Party - North Antrim)
That this House congratulates motorbike champion Glenn Irwin on his consecutive victory as Irish Motorcyclist of the Year at the annual motorbike awards ceremony in Belfast; and notes the outstanding achievement by Glenn Irwin to win this trophy in consecutive years.
2 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
View All Ian Paisley's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Ian Paisley, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Ian Paisley has not been granted any Urgent Questions

3 Adjournment Debates led by Ian Paisley

Wednesday 19th July 2023
Monday 31st October 2022

2 Bills introduced by Ian Paisley


A Bill to grant a right of access to the digital devices of a dead or incapacitated person to their next of kin; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 6th May 2022

A Bill to require a supermajority of votes in favour of a proposal for constitutional change on which a referendum is being held in order for it to be decided in the affirmative.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 8th November 2022

126 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether manufacturers are required to declare how they plan to reach (a) Net Zero and (b) Net Zero within their supply chains.

Climate transition plans allow companies to set out how they plan to reach climate targets, including supply chain decarbonisation.

The Government has established the Transition Plan Taskforce, which launched in April 2022. The Taskforce is developing guidance to support companies to disclose information about their transition plans, and is due to publish its finalised Disclosure Framework in October 2023. The Government has also committed to consult on our approach to transition plans, and we will do so after the Taskforce has published its finalised Framework.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what recent progress her Department has made on negotiating a free trade agreement with India; whether she has had discussions with her Indian counterpart on the potential merits of including tariff reductions for Irish whiskey exporters in that agreement; and if she will make a statement.

A free trade agreement with India offers the opportunity to deepen our already strong trade relationship, worth £34 billion in the year to end Q3 2022.

We seek a forward-looking FTA which includes a solid market access offer that can boost firms like Irish whiskey exporters, as well as easing red tape for services and ensuring greater legal certainty for investment.

On 10 February 2023, the seventh round of UK-India FTA concluded. We do not discuss details of live negotiations, and will only sign a deal that is fair, reciprocal, and ultimately in the best interests of the British people and the economy.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she plans to take steps to undertake (a) trade missions and (b) other export promotion activities to help support Irish whiskey exporters from Northern Ireland to increase sales in Australia, in the context of the UK-Australia free trade agreement.

Our world-class trade agreement with Australia will bring opportunities to every part of the UK. Whiskey Distilleries from Northern Ireland will benefit from tariffs being cut to 0%, the slashing of red tape and simplified customs procedures, making it cheaper and easier to export their products to Australia.

The Department for Business and Trade works in close partnership with the Irish Whiskey Association on a range of issues. These include trade policy and export promotion activities focussing on opportunities in their target priority markets, which include Australia.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has had recent discussions with the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities on the preparedness of the planning system for the development of green hydrogen facilities.

Officials are collaborating closely to ensure the planning system is optimised to support the development of a rapidly expanding UK hydrogen economy. This includes through the BEIS Hydrogen Regulators Forum and bilateral engagement.

The Government will continue to work with industry and regulators to identify, prioritise and implement any changes to the existing framework, including addressing any gaps, to support the growth of the hydrogen economy.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Feb 2021
What recent steps his Department has taken to prepare for the UK potentially not associating to Horizon Europe.

I am delighted that, as part of our deal with the EU, we have agreed to associate to Horizon Europe. This represents a valuable collaboration on science and research to tackle global challenges, and in fields that will benefit UK citizens including the people of Northern Ireland.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to encourage private investment into the UK hydrogen market.

We recognise the importance that ambition, and a supportive policy framework have had in building investor confidence in the development of low carbon technologies in the UK.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution will mobilise £12 billion of government investment to unlock three times as much private sector investment by 2030.

The Ten Point Plan and Energy White Paper both set out that the Government, working with industry, aims to have 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity in the UK by 2030.

In support of this we have announced a £240m Net Zero Hydrogen Fund for capital co-investment in new low carbon hydrogen production, to bring forward a combination of CCUS-enabled ‘blue’ hydrogen and electrolytic ‘green’ hydrogen projects. We have also committed to consulting this year on a preferred hydrogen revenue mechanism, which will support private sector investment.

The Government will publish a dedicated Hydrogen Strategy in the first half of this year. This will offer more detail on how we will work with industry to meet the 2030 ambition.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 8 December 2020 to Question 122697 on Coronavirus: Vaccination, how much funding his Department plans to allocate towards vaccine research that does not involve human fetal tissue in its development, production and laboratory testing in 2021; and whether his Department has plans to increase the level of such funding in future years.

The Department’s Research and Development (R&D) settlement has increased to £11.1 billion for 2021/22. This settlement supports our commitments as set out in the R&D Roadmap and helps to consolidate our position as a science superpower. Specific funding is subject to our departmental allocations process, which is now underway and progressing at pace, including the allocation of this funding to UK Research and Innovation (UKRI).

Most of the research into vaccines for human use that is funded by the Department is carried out through the Medical Research Council (MRC), part of UKRI. The latest available data shows that in 2017/18, the MRC funded £25 million into research aimed at developing vaccines. This data does not record whether this work involved the use of aborted human foetal tissue.

Any use of such tissue would require an ethical review and must be in accordance with legal requirements. The MRC has produced guidance on the ethical and legal requirements for the use of human tissue in the research that it funds.

UKRI welcomes high quality applications for support into any aspect of human health and these are judged in open competition with other demands on funding. Awards are made according to their scientific quality and importance to human health. Where specific funding is allocated in advance for a strategic area of research, such as vaccines, such allocations would not normally specify the research methodology to be used.

13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 8 December 2020 to Question 122697 on Coronavirus: Vaccination, how much funding his Department allocated towards vaccine research that did not involve aborted human fetal tissue in its development, production and laboratory testing in each of the last five years.

The Department’s Research and Development (R&D) settlement has increased to £11.1 billion for 2021/22. This settlement supports our commitments as set out in the R&D Roadmap and helps to consolidate our position as a science superpower. Specific funding is subject to our departmental allocations process, which is now underway and progressing at pace, including the allocation of this funding to UK Research and Innovation (UKRI).

Most of the research into vaccines for human use that is funded by the Department is carried out through the Medical Research Council (MRC), part of UKRI. The latest available data shows that in 2017/18, the MRC funded £25 million into research aimed at developing vaccines. This data does not record whether this work involved the use of aborted human foetal tissue.

Any use of such tissue would require an ethical review and must be in accordance with legal requirements. The MRC has produced guidance on the ethical and legal requirements for the use of human tissue in the research that it funds.

UKRI welcomes high quality applications for support into any aspect of human health and these are judged in open competition with other demands on funding. Awards are made according to their scientific quality and importance to human health. Where specific funding is allocated in advance for a strategic area of research, such as vaccines, such allocations would not normally specify the research methodology to be used.

8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his plans to (a) promote the cultivation of and (b) develop processing facilities for bioenergy crops will be put in place in all parts of the UK.

BEIS works across the UK government and alongside the Devolved Administrations to deliver our carbon budgets and net zero target for 2050. Analysis by the Committee on Climate Change of low-cost pathways to net zero has suggested that an expanded domestic supply of bioenergy feedstocks could be valuable in meeting those targets.

BEIS does not directly fund the promotion of bioenergy crops and their processing. BEIS currently supports the production of low carbon electricity and heat from bioenergy feedstocks through schemes such as the Feed in Tariff and Renewable Heat Incentive, and continues to explore the scope for innovation to address economic and technical issues facing the bioenergy sector.

Land use and agriculture are devolved matters.

19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government plans to take to ensure that non-essential shops and food and beverage outlets at airports are able to effectively operate within the airside and international travel environment.

On 11 May, the Government published its COVID-19 recovery strategy which sets out a roadmap to a phased recovery. As per my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s announcement of the five ministerial-led taskforces which form part of this recovery effort, BEIS is responsible for two of the five ministerial-led taskforces: Pubs and restaurants and Non-essential retail (including salons). Phase 2 of the approach will look at re-opening closed businesses in these sectors and the taskforces will be working closely with key stakeholders to begin reopening retail businesses in phases from 1 June.

These taskforces will aim to look at various issues which impact the closed businesses and we will develop plans for how and when closed sectors can reopen safely in due time, guided by the science and experts.

25th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions she has had with independent news publishers regarding the news publisher definition in the Online Safety Bill; and if she will make a statement.

Ministers and officials have consulted extensively with a wide range of stakeholders during the drafting of the Bill.

Online Safety legislation has been designed to safeguard access to journalistic content. News publishers’ content will be exempted from platforms’ new online safety duties. The criteria against which an organisation qualifies as a publisher is set in the draft Online Safety Bill. If an organisation meets these criteria, then its content will be exempt.

The Bill will also impose a duty on the biggest and riskiest companies, Category 1 companies, to safeguard all journalistic content shared on their platform. Through this duty, these platforms will need to have systems in place to ensure they take into account the importance of the free expression of journalistic content when operating their services.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her Department's policy is on whether multi-academy trusts must be an exempt charity, rather than a charity.

All academy trusts are exempt charities under paragraph 8 of Schedule 3 to the Charities Act 2011.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she is taking steps to encourage charity involvement in setting up new schools.

The free schools programme was established to deliver choice, innovation and higher standards for parents by injecting fresh approaches and drawing in talent and expertise from a wide variety of groups and backgrounds. The department has delivered hundreds of new schools and provided thousands of good school places across the country.

The free schools programme continues to encourage innovation, as well as building the capacity of some of the countries’ strongest trusts to raise education standards. In the most recent mainstream wave, the department approved an innovative partnership between Eton College and Star Academies to deliver free schools in Dudley, Oldham and Teesside for pupils aged 16 to 19. These schools will help increase the numbers of disadvantaged students progressing to top universities. The department also approved a new BRIT School North in Bradford, which will be the first of its kind in the region. This school will provide career pathways for creative industries in the North of England and is supported by industry leaders.

The department has also committed to delivering a 16-19 mathematics school in every region, with eleven in total. Seven maths schools are already open with the remaining four schools approved to open in the future. These small schools, partnered with the most selective mathematics universities, will prepare some of the most mathematically able students for university and help to address shortages of highly skilled graduates in sectors which depend on science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

To open a free school, the provider must establish an academy trust, which is set up as an exempt charity. In the latest mainstream free school wave, the department invited all new providers, including charities, to apply to open a new school. Similarly, in the latest alternative provision free school wave, the department invited applications from partnerships, including charities, alongside academy trusts and local authorities.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to encourage innovation when setting up new schools.

The free schools programme was established to deliver choice, innovation and higher standards for parents by injecting fresh approaches and drawing in talent and expertise from a wide variety of groups and backgrounds. The department has delivered hundreds of new schools and provided thousands of good school places across the country.

The free schools programme continues to encourage innovation, as well as building the capacity of some of the countries’ strongest trusts to raise education standards. In the most recent mainstream wave, the department approved an innovative partnership between Eton College and Star Academies to deliver free schools in Dudley, Oldham and Teesside for pupils aged 16 to 19. These schools will help increase the numbers of disadvantaged students progressing to top universities. The department also approved a new BRIT School North in Bradford, which will be the first of its kind in the region. This school will provide career pathways for creative industries in the North of England and is supported by industry leaders.

The department has also committed to delivering a 16-19 mathematics school in every region, with eleven in total. Seven maths schools are already open with the remaining four schools approved to open in the future. These small schools, partnered with the most selective mathematics universities, will prepare some of the most mathematically able students for university and help to address shortages of highly skilled graduates in sectors which depend on science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

To open a free school, the provider must establish an academy trust, which is set up as an exempt charity. In the latest mainstream free school wave, the department invited all new providers, including charities, to apply to open a new school. Similarly, in the latest alternative provision free school wave, the department invited applications from partnerships, including charities, alongside academy trusts and local authorities.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
6th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential implications for national security of the proportion of funding for universities from China.

The Integrated Review Refresh, which this government published in March 2023, sets out in clear terms the UK’s policy towards China.

The UK is a world-leading destination for foreign students, including from China, where they add to the academic richness of UK universities. However, a key part of the International Education Strategy is diversification. Universities must ensure they have appropriate processes in place to manage the risks associated with dependence on a single source of funding, whether that is from a single organisation or a single country. The Office for Students (OfS), the regulator of higher education in England, monitors the risk of over-reliance on overseas income at a sector level.

The department recognises concerns about overseas interference in the higher education sector and regularly assess the risks facing academia. The department has acted to remove government funding from Confucius Institutes in the UK. The department will continue to take steps to significantly strengthen the UK’s protections from overseas interference in our higher education sector, helping to safeguard intellectual property and sensitive research.

The Higher Education (Freedom of Speech) Act 2023 will introduce increased transparency and the monitoring of certain overseas funding received by higher education providers in England. The protection of individuals’ rights, freedoms, and safety in the UK is taken very seriously. Attempts by foreign powers to intimidate, harass or harm individuals or communities in the UK will not be tolerated.

The department has committed, in the Integrated Review Refresh, to review the full set of legislative and other provisions designed to protect the academic sector, in order to identify what more can be or should be done.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
6th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential impact of the proportion of funding for universities from China on (a) academic freedoms and (b) student welfare.

The Integrated Review Refresh, which this government published in March 2023, sets out in clear terms the UK’s policy towards China.

The UK is a world-leading destination for foreign students, including from China, where they add to the academic richness of UK universities. However, a key part of the International Education Strategy is diversification. Universities must ensure they have appropriate processes in place to manage the risks associated with dependence on a single source of funding, whether that is from a single organisation or a single country. The Office for Students (OfS), the regulator of higher education in England, monitors the risk of over-reliance on overseas income at a sector level.

The department recognises concerns about overseas interference in the higher education sector and regularly assess the risks facing academia. The department has acted to remove government funding from Confucius Institutes in the UK. The department will continue to take steps to significantly strengthen the UK’s protections from overseas interference in our higher education sector, helping to safeguard intellectual property and sensitive research.

The Higher Education (Freedom of Speech) Act 2023 will introduce increased transparency and the monitoring of certain overseas funding received by higher education providers in England. The protection of individuals’ rights, freedoms, and safety in the UK is taken very seriously. Attempts by foreign powers to intimidate, harass or harm individuals or communities in the UK will not be tolerated.

The department has committed, in the Integrated Review Refresh, to review the full set of legislative and other provisions designed to protect the academic sector, in order to identify what more can be or should be done.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
6th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the report The Strategic Dependence of UK Universities on China, published by Civitas on 2 November 2023, whether her Department is taking steps to help reduce the proportion of funding universities receive from China.

The Integrated Review Refresh, which this government published in March 2023, sets out in clear terms the UK’s policy towards China.

The UK is a world-leading destination for foreign students, including from China, where they add to the academic richness of UK universities. However, a key part of the International Education Strategy is diversification. Universities must ensure they have appropriate processes in place to manage the risks associated with dependence on a single source of funding, whether that is from a single organisation or a single country. The Office for Students (OfS), the regulator of higher education in England, monitors the risk of over-reliance on overseas income at a sector level.

The department recognises concerns about overseas interference in the higher education sector and regularly assess the risks facing academia. The department has acted to remove government funding from Confucius Institutes in the UK. The department will continue to take steps to significantly strengthen the UK’s protections from overseas interference in our higher education sector, helping to safeguard intellectual property and sensitive research.

The Higher Education (Freedom of Speech) Act 2023 will introduce increased transparency and the monitoring of certain overseas funding received by higher education providers in England. The protection of individuals’ rights, freedoms, and safety in the UK is taken very seriously. Attempts by foreign powers to intimidate, harass or harm individuals or communities in the UK will not be tolerated.

The department has committed, in the Integrated Review Refresh, to review the full set of legislative and other provisions designed to protect the academic sector, in order to identify what more can be or should be done.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to support the families of pupils on free school meals in during the school summer holidays in 2020; and whether support will be available in Northern Ireland.

I refer the hon. Members to the answer I gave on 23 June 2020 to Question 54195.

27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to protect students from being charged for accommodation costs whilst they are at home as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

As both my right hon. Friends, the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer have made clear, the government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID-19.

The government encourages universities and private hall providers to be fair in their decisions about rent charges for this period. A number of universities and large companies have waived rents for the summer term or released students early from their contracts.

Students will continue to receive scheduled payments of loans towards their living costs for the remainder of the current, 2019/20, academic year. Students who are tenants with individual private landlords are entitled to support if they are impacted by COVID-19, such as repayable rent reductions or postponements.

Accommodation providers should not instruct students to return home. If any accommodation provider did formally instruct a student to leave the property then it would be unacceptable to continue to charge student rents.

If a student thinks their accommodation provider is treating them unfairly, they can raise a complaint under the accommodation codes of practice as long as their provider is a code member. The codes can be found at: https://www.thesac.org.uk/; https://www.unipol.org.uk/the-code/how-to-complain and: https://www.rla.org.uk/about/nrla-code-of-practice.shtml.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the education workforce, including staff in alternative provision, understand their role in working with other public bodies to help tackle serious youth violence, particularly in light of the proposed introduction of a new statutory duty.

The legal duty aims to ensure key organisations in a local area collaborate in a multi-agency approach to tackle serious violence. The Department for Education is working with the Home Office to ensure that the education sector is a key part of the multi-agency partnership. We will be engaging with schools and colleges, including alternative provision institutions, and aim to publish guidance to help support education providers to understand the level of commitment the duty may place on them.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Timpson review of school exclusion: Government response, published in May 2019, what the timetable is for the steps his Department plans to take to make schools accountable for the children they exclude.

The Government is taking forward an ambitious programme of action on behaviour, exclusion and alternative provision (AP) which will respect head teachers’ powers to use exclusion when they need to, enable schools to support children at risk of exclusion, and ensure that excluded children continue to receive a good education. We will expand AP and improve the quality of the sector so that pupils in AP receive an education on a par with that received by their mainstream peers and receive the support they need in other areas. Further information on the timeframes for this work will be provided in due course.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the implementation of the new Relationship and Sex Education curriculum at the early adopter sites.

The Department for Education is working closely with over 1600 schools across the country who are acting, on a voluntary basis, as early adopters of relationships education; relationships and sex education (RSE); and health education. As early adopters, these schools have indicated their intention to start teaching the new requirements: relationships education (for primary aged pupils), RSE (for secondary aged pupils) and health education (all pupils in state-funded schools), during the academic year 2019/20, ahead of the subjects being compulsory from September 2020.

The Department is working closely with these early adopter schools to develop a programme of support. Recently four national conferences took place, to help early adopters plan for delivery of the new subjects, and to enable the Department to learn about their current practices and assess support needs. Following feedback from the conferences, consideration is being given to what further regional support may be required.

This engagement with early adopter schools is helping the Department develop its programme of support for the new subjects, which will be available to all teachers from spring 2020. The programme will focus on tools that improve schools’ practice and will offer opportunities for teachers to improve subject knowledge, build confidence and share best practice. This support will be accessed through a new online service and will include an implementation guide, which will accompany the statutory guidance, case studies from early adopter schools, and innovative materials to support staff training. We will continue to test this package with early adopter schools.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the mental health support teams in schools established by the trailblazer programme.

The first 25 Mental Health Support Team (MHST) trailblazer sites, delivering 59 MHSTs were announced in December 2018. These MHSTs are all expected to have completed their training by the end of 2019/early 2020 and will be fully operational following this. As a result, it is too early to assess their effectiveness in schools and colleges.

The national, early evaluation of the trailblazer programme formally commenced on 1 October 2019. The protocol for the first phase of the evaluation is available at https://fundingawards.nihr.ac.uk/award/16/138/31, and findings are expected to be published in Spring/Summer 2021.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of mental health assessments for looked after children.

Healthcare and social care are devolved matters.

The Department jointly commissioned with Department for Health and Social Care an Expert Working Group to look at how the mental health needs of looked-after children, previously looked-after children and care leavers in England could be better met. In November 2017, the group made a set of recommendations including on improving assessment of the mental health needs of looked-after children.

The Department is taking forward a number of these recommendations through our £1 million mental health assessment pilot programme, which is testing improved approaches to the mental health and wellbeing element of the health assessment on entry to care.

The Department has appointed SQW Limited to carry out an evaluation of the pilot and fieldwork is currently underway. This will help inform our assessment of the changes needed to the mental health assessments of looked-after children.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to (a) expand alternative provision and (b) ensure that alternative provision provides education at a (a) Good or (b) Outstanding by OFSTED.

The Department is committed to reforming alternative provision (AP) including expanding and attracting high quality AP as an integral part of the free schools programme. We will announce the successful applicants of the current wave of AP and special Free Schools in early 2020.

As of December 2019, 81% of pupil referral units, AP academies and AP free schools were rated good or outstanding by Ofsted. The Department’s reforms will continue to improve the quality of the sector, building on the good practice being tested in our £4 million AP Innovation Fund projects and learning from the effective approaches my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has seen in a number of his visits to AP institutions.

6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department has produced guidance on (a) the use of packaging by manufacturers when distributing (i) consumables and (ii) non-consumables to their supply chain and (b) declaring the amount of packaging used for operational processing.

Guidance for obligated businesses on their current packaging waste recycling responsibilities is published on GOV.UK. The requirements include registering with the regulator, reporting data on the packaging they use or supply, meeting recycling obligations and obtaining evidence of compliance with the regulations. Guidance has also been published on GOV.UK on meeting new reporting requirements under the Extended Producer Responsibility for packaging scheme. Defra has not published guidance on the use of packaging by manufacturers when distributing products.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to reduce the packaging used for distributing (a) consumables and (b) non-consumables within manufacturers' supply chains.

Our proposals for Extended Producer Responsibility for packaging will make businesses financially responsible for the waste management costs of the packaging they use or supply that ends up in household bins and street bins. This includes packaging used to distribute products purchased online directly to consumers. This will encourage businesses to reduce the amount of packaging they use and to use packaging that can be recycled easily. The UK Government jointly with the Devolved Administrations is consulting currently on the draft Regulations that will introduce Extended Producer Responsibility for packaging. These do not include any specific requirements on businesses to reduce distribution packaging.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make representations to her US counterpart on the potential merits of granting whiskey from Northern Ireland the same level of distinctive product protection as afforded to Scotch whisky in that country.

The UK Government fully recognises the importance of Irish Whiskey to the Northern Ireland economy, and we welcome the recent rise in exports of Irish Whiskey to the United States. We are fully supportive of attempts by the industry to strengthen the protection of Irish Whiskey in US federal law and will ask the US Government to pursue this to align with protection afforded already to Scotch Whisky.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the effect on air quality of the use of hydrogen energy technology.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Twickenham on 10 September, PQ UIN 905828.

[https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2020-09-10/905828]

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent assessment he has made of the long-term viability of the UN Relief and Works Agency.

The United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) is an essential humanitarian and stabilising force in the region, providing vital services to millions of Palestinian refugees every day. The UK recognises the need for UNRWA to reform to help ensure its sustainability. To this end, in 2018 UNRWA undertook serious steps to improve its long-term viability by broadening its donor base and securing funding from 12 new donors, signing 8 new multi-year funding commitments in 2018, and implementing significant programme reform measures

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps he is taking to monitor the delivery and spending of UK Official Development Assistance to the Palestinian Authority.

DFID has robust measures in place to ensure UK Aid reaches its intended beneficiaries. UK aid to the Palestinian Authority’s (PA’s) health and education sectors is channelled through the EU Palestinian-European Socio-Economic Management Assistance Mechanism. Our money goes into a dedicated bank account before being paid to individuals who have been vetted in advance. The bank account is only used for UK aid. Independent auditors check that the money paid out from this bank account only went to the vetted individuals after every disbursement.

UK assistance to the PA for water and energy will be through the World Bank Partnership for Infrastructure Development in the West Bank and Gaza Multi Donor Trust Fund. UK aid will flow from the trust fund to dedicated accounts that will be managed by the PA in accordance with rules established by the World Bank, and be subject to the review of external financial auditors to provide assurance that the expenditure of funds was only on agreed programme activities.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps he is taking to ensure that UK official development assistance to the Palestinians facilitates peace-building with Israel.

The UK Government, alongside other governments, works in the Occupied Palestinian Territories to improve the lives of Palestinians in support of our commitment to maintain the viability of a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This includes humanitarian support to meet immediate needs in Gaza, support to key services such as education and health in the West Bank, and promoting economic development across the Occupied Palestinian Territories. DFID’s work supports stability and the development of a capable and accountable Palestinian Authority that can act as an effective partner for peace with Israel. We also support People to People work that aims to bring together Israelis and Palestinians to cooperate on issues that can have a positive impact on both communities. Building understanding between people on both sides of the conflict will be crucial in helping build support for a peaceful, negotiated lasting resolution.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she is taking to negotiate the reduction or elimination of tariffs on the export of Northern Irish single malt whiskey to the US.

The UK government is committed to achieving the removal of punitive tariffs impacting UK industries, such as Northern Irish Whiskey Distillers, by de-escalating this dispute.

The Secretary of State for International Trade will be engaging the Biden administration at the earliest opportunity to find a mutually beneficial and balanced settlement that works for the whole of the UK and to the benefit of UK businesses. We want to de-escalate and resolve the disputes so that we can deepen trading ties with the US and move onto the next phase of our trading relationship.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps his Department plans to take to ensure UK music remains internationally competitive (a) during and (b) after the covid-19 pandemic.

The Department for International Trade consistently champions the British music industry and the incredible talent which makes the sector such a great success story for the UK.

The Government has put in place unprecedented support for businesses and workers to protect them against the economic impact of COVID-19. In 2020/21, the Government is providing export support of around £1 million to UK music companies. Most of this is grant support offered to the Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the UK’s music sector through the International Showcase Fund and the Music Export Growth Scheme. Companies in Northern Ireland have benefited from both schemes, with the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and Invest Northern Ireland supporting the International Showcase Fund as funding partners.

During the pandemic, the Government has provided support for digital events so music companies can continue to do business with international customers. The Government is working closely with the Creative Industries Trade and Investment Board, which includes music representatives, to develop a creative industries trade and investment recovery strategy which will enable the UK music sector to maintain its strong international position.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to extend the phase out dates for new non-zero emission (a) mopeds and (b) motorcycles.

The consultation on when to end the sale of new non-zero emission L-category vehicles (including mopeds and motorcycles) was open to written responses from 14 July to 21 September 2022 and supported by a thorough programme of stakeholder engagement with manufacturers and industry. The Department is now analysing the responses and will bring forward the Government’s response in due course.

8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to support hydrogen use in public transport ecosystems.

In March 2022, the Government announced £30 million for the West Midlands Combined Authority to deploy 124 hydrogen fuel cell buses and accompanying refuelling infrastructure through its Zero Emission Bus Regional Areas scheme. The Government has also provided £750,000 towards the UK’s first hydrogen train, Hydroflex through the First of a Kind scheme.

8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to encourage hydrogen use in private sector fleets.

Passenger cars were in scope for the Department’s £20 million Tees Valley Hydrogen Transport Hub competition, which closed on 2 December. The Government has previously supported private sector car fleets through its £23 million Hydrogen for Transport Programme and £2 million Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Fleet Support Scheme. In addition, the Government expects there to be cascade benefits for light duty vehicles from its R&D support programmes for heavier modes, for example through the expansion of publicly accessible refuelling infrastructure, available to all road transport.

29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of the zero-emission buses purchased using the £355 million allocated in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021 will be made in the UK.

As set out in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021 £355 million of new funding has been made available for zero emission buses. UK bus manufacturers are well placed to benefit from this funding for zero emission buses.

29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he will announce the successful applicants to the Zero Emission Bus Regional Areas (ZEBRA) slow-track process.

17 local transport authorities are working to produce business cases under the standard process of the Zero Emission Bus Regional Areas (ZEBRA) scheme. The Department will award funding to successful business cases under the standard process in Spring 2022.

25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to promote the use of hydrogen in transport.

The Prime Minister’s Ten Point Plan for a green industrial revolution included ambitious new policies and investment in hydrogen transport projects including:

  • £20 million to support the development of cost-effective, zero emission heavy goods vehicles in the UK
  • £20 million to help develop clean maritime technology
  • £3 million in the recently announced Tees Valley Hydrogen Transport Hub

We will build on those announcements and set out the role for hydrogen in our forthcoming Transport Decarbonisation Plan, which will set out how we intend to reduce emissions and deliver transport’s contribution to net zero by 2050.

20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Prime Minister's statement of 11 February 2020, Transport Infrastructure, Official Report, column 712, what discussions he has had with the Prime Minister on the timeline for the deployment of the funding committed to the purchase of more than 4,000 zero-carbon buses.

The Secretary of State has not had any specific conversations with the Prime Minister regarding the timeline for allocating the buses portion of the £5 billion funding package, that was announced in February this year.

Details of the 4,000 zero-emission buses from the funding package, including how the funding will be distributed, will be announced in due course.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the length of time between (a) urgent GP referrals and (b) the commencement of treatment for cancer in North Antrim constituency.

Health in Northern Ireland is a devolved matter; therefore, the Department does not hold this information centrally.

6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that reporting mechanisms are in place to inform the (a) public and (b) parliament how the nine statutory joint radiotherapy committees are improving access to modern radiotherapy.

The nine statutory joint committees between NHS England and multi-integrated care board (ICB) collaborations established on 1 April 2023 are working to improve access to specialised services by bringing together regional specialised commissioning expertise and integrated care systems (ICSs). These committees have joint responsibility for commissioning decisions on 59 specialised services, including radiotherapy. A list of these services is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/02/board-2-feb-23-item-7-annex-a-final-spa-lists.pdf

Reporting mechanisms are in place as part of ICS governance, with ICB leaders publishing an annual report to their population stating what their health and healthcare services are delivering for their population and communities.

To ensure appropriate oversight and assurance of specialised services under the nine statutory joint committees in 2023/24, NHS England produced guidance for its regional teams and ICBs. The guidance sets out four key areas that NHS England's regional specialised commissioning teams, working with and through the joint committees, should be regularly overseeing and monitoring in relation to their specialised provision (including providers of radiotherapy services): timeliness of provision; quality of provision; use of resources and value for money; and equity and health inequalities.

20th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the funding for antimicrobial resistance research through the Global AMR Innovation Fund, whether his Department has a long-term investment strategy for stimulating non-profit innovation to help tackle antimicrobial resistance.

Research and innovation are crucial pillars of activity under the Government’s five-year National Action Plan (NAP), covering the period 2019 to 2024, for tackling antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and will continue to be a priority under the next NAP. The Government is currently developing this second five-year NAP, which will run from 2024 to 2029. This includes development of a series research priorities, commitments, and deliverables.

As part of this approach, the Global AMR Innovation Fund (GAMRIF) is a One Health UK aid fund that supports research and development around the world to reduce the threat of AMR in humans, animals, and the environment for the benefit of people in low- and middle-income countries. GAMRIF collaborates with academia, non-profit global initiatives, industry, and governments to support innovation and product development, while also ensuring sustained investment from other global donors to tackle AMR.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
19th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance he has issued to (a) providers of (i) inpatient and (ii) outpatient care and (b) patients receiving community care on (A) the assessment and selection of the most clinically appropriate absorbent continence care products for patients with incontinence and (B) the delivery of person centred care; and whether he has made an estimate of the cost of provision of products other than the most clinically appropriate for such patients.

While no known central guidance has been issued to date on this topic, local areas may have developed a local formulary where they recommend the use of specific products. We have not made a central estimate of the cost of different provision. However, we are working to improve spend data systems through implementation of the medtech strategy.

National Health Service commissioners in England are responsible for urinary continence care based on the available evidence and taking into account guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.Integrated care boards (ICBs) are responsible for the commissioning of health services in their local health economy.

NHS England’s Excellence in Continence Care guidance, published in July 2018, which brings together evidence-based resources and research for guidance for commissioners, providers, health and social care staff, further indicates that personalised care including personal health budgets can be arranged locally by ICBs to help people manage and pay for their continence care needs.

12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's guidance entitled Procedures for the approval of independent sector places for termination of pregnancy (abortion) in England, what specific implications relating to the taking of abortion medicines beyond the legal limit of 9 weeks and 6 days gestation women should be made aware of under that guidance when having an early medical abortion at home.

Women having an early medical abortion at home should be informed of the implications, health and otherwise, of taking the abortion medicine beyond the legal limit of nine weeks and six days gestation. Women would also be advised on self-management including any signs and symptoms and when to obtain healthcare support, how to dispose of or return the abortion pills if they are not used and how they can be sure that the pregnancy has ended.

The Department’s Required Standard Operating Procedures, which all independent abortion providers must comply with, set out that woman seeking an abortion should be informed about their options so that they can make an informed choice about their preferred course of action within the legal framework for abortion in England.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Mental Health Bill, whether he plans to include a statutory duty to provide early intervention strategies to detect and address mental health issues for children and young people within primary and secondary schools; and if he will make a statement.

The draft Mental Health Bill, published in June 2022, is intended to modernise the Mental Health Act and work better for people with serious mental illness. The draft Bill has completed its pre-legislative scrutiny and the Joint Committee published its report on 19 January 2023 on the Draft Mental Health Bill. The Department will consider the Committee’s recommendations carefully and we will introduce the Bill when parliamentary time allows.

Separate to the provisions in the draft Bill, there are currently 287 mental health support teams in place in around 4,700 schools and colleges across the country, offering support to children experiencing anxiety, depression and other common mental health issue. These

teams now cover 26% of pupils, a year earlier than originally planned and this will increase to 399 teams, covering around 35% of pupils by April 2023 with over 500 planned to be deployed by 2024.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he is taking steps to encourage manufacturers of cannabis-based medicinal products to (a) conduct clinical trials and (b) pursue regulatory approval for their products.

The National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) has issued two calls for research proposals and a highlight notice on medicinal cannabis. Manufacturers are responsible for generating evidence to support the use of these products and to seek regulatory approval. The Government has encouraged manufacturers to do so and offered scientific and research advice from the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency and the NIHR.

12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many to UK-based randomised clinical trials for cannabis-based medicinal products (a) have been completed since 2018 and (b) are currently ongoing.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency advised there have been 20 United Kingdom-based randomised clinical trials for cannabis-based medicinal products completed since 2018 and 13 are currently ongoing.

12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the medicines regulatory system at supporting novel clinical trials for rare disease treatments.

No specific assessment has been made. However, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) offers a 10-year period of market exclusivity for orphan designated products, which can encourage the pharmaceutical industry to develop medicines for rare diseases. There are flexibilities in the licensing system which consider novel clinical trials and data generation aspects for small population research, such as a Conditional Marketing Authorisation.

The Innovative Licensing and Access Pathway (ILAP) supports bespoke product development programmes and aims to accelerate the time to market, facilitating more rapid and efficient patient access to medicines. The entry criteria for the ILAP include a rare disease aspect and a toolkit encourages the use of novel approaches to the clinical trial design and development programme. The MHRA supports the design of novel clinical trials through formal scientific advice, where the methodology, challenges and opportunities of the approach can be considered by a team of experts and the study sponsor.

20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will take steps to bring forward a workforce strategy for the dental sector which includes (a) NHS, (b) mixed and (c) private dentist practices.

In July 2022, we announced measures to reform National Health Service dental services to increase access for patients and remunerate dentists fairly for caring for patients with complex needs. We are also working with NHS England and the sector on longer-term improvements. Health Education England has undertaken a three-year review of education and training which is being implemented through the Dental Education Reform Programme to improve recruitment and retention.

The Department has commissioned NHS England to develop a long-term plan for workforce groups and professions in the NHS for the next 15 years, which will include dental care professionals. The conclusions of this work will be available in due course.

20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment she has made for the implications of her policies of the level of recruitment and retention of dentists in Northern Ireland.

No specific assessment has been made.

15th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to reduce waiting times for joint replacement surgery for arthritis; and what steps his Department is taking to support people awaiting that surgery.

Joint replacement surgery is being prioritised through the High Volume Low Complexity programme, which focuses on improving clinical pathways and quality of care. The programme adopts best clinical and operational practice and aims to establish fast-track surgical hubs for high volume elective procedures, such as hip and knee joint replacements, to reduce waiting times. An additional £1.5 billion is being invested in elective services, including for new surgical hubs and increased bed capacity, including for joint replacement surgery.

In the ‘Delivery Plan for tackling the Covid-19 backlog of elective care’, sets out how care pathways will be simplified for patients and their carers. The pathway improvement programme will focus on the most common types of care, including musculoskeletal (MSK) services. NHS England is currently working with Versus Arthritis on the development of new MSK pathways and a MSK strategy. This includes long-term conditions, pain management, personalised care and supporting patients waiting and preparing for surgery.

Through collaboration with the British Orthopaedic Association, the British Society for Rheumatology, the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, the Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance and Versus Arthritis, NHS England has also developed self-management resources for patients awaiting surgery to manage the physical and mental aspects of their condition at home.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
15th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to reduce waiting times for joint replacement surgery; and what steps his Department is taking to support people awaiting that surgery.

Joint replacement surgery is being prioritised through the High Volume Low Complexity programme, which focuses on improving clinical pathways and quality of care. The programme adopts best clinical and operational practice and aims to establish fast-track surgical hubs for high volume elective procedures, such as hip and knee joint replacements, to reduce waiting times. An additional £1.5 billion is being invested in elective services, including for new surgical hubs and increased bed capacity, including for joint replacement surgery.

In the ‘Delivery Plan for tackling the Covid-19 backlog of elective care’, sets out how care pathways will be simplified for patients and their carers. The pathway improvement programme will focus on the most common types of care, including musculoskeletal (MSK) services. NHS England is currently working with Versus Arthritis on the development of new MSK pathways and a MSK strategy. This includes long-term conditions, pain management, personalised care and supporting patients waiting and preparing for surgery.

Through collaboration with the British Orthopaedic Association, the British Society for Rheumatology, the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, the Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance and Versus Arthritis, NHS England has also developed self-management resources for patients awaiting surgery to manage the physical and mental aspects of their condition at home.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
15th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure integrated pre-operative, operative and post-operative care for people with arthritis.

NHS England's Best MSK Health Collaborative is working with local systems, those with direct lived experience, patient groups and organisations representing clinicians to deliver integrated musculoskeletal services, including for those with arthritis.

Through the Health and Care Act 2022 integrated care boards have a duty to promote integration where it would improve the quality of services and reduce inequalities of access or outcome.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of psychosocial provision for people with Cystic Fibrosis.

NHS England’s adult and paediatric cystic fibrosis service specifications set out national standards for cystic fibrosis services, including the importance of access to multidisciplinary teams involving appropriately trained clinical psychologists and social workers. There are regular review meetings between the regional commissioning teams and providers to ensure compliance with service standards. Those with long term conditions such as cystic fibrosis can also access psychological support via Improving Access to Psychological Therapies services.

Health Education England has supported a 60% expansion in the clinical psychology training intake in the past two years. Trainees can undertake specialist placements and upon qualification take up posts across a wide range of settings, including working with adults and children with cystic fibrosis.

The white paper, ‘People at the Heart of Care’, is supported by at least £500 million to develop and support the adult social care workforce over the next three years. We are also supporting the social care workforce through the development of a post-graduate mental health social work programme, the Education Support Grant and Social Work Bursaries.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he plans to take to increase radiotherapy cancer treatment (a) capacity and (b) access; what assessment he has made of the role of radiotherapy treatment services in (i) reducing waiting times and (ii) tackling the cancer treatment backlog; and if he will meet with leading radiotherapy professionals to discuss the backlog in cancer care and treatment.

In 2022/23, NHS England and NHS Improvement intend to undertake a capacity and demand review of external beam radiotherapy capacity, to support local systems to plan radiotherapy provision, including the replacement of equipment. NHS England and NHS Improvement have committed to review the payment arrangements for radiotherapy, to ensure that appropriate incentives are in place to encourage providers to increase access to new treatments and techniques and to upgrade and replace equipment.

New radiotherapy methods are being delivered to address current backlogs through targeted treatment in fewer hospital visits, minimising patient time in hospital. Radiotherapy activity is also included in the Elective Recovery Fund, which aims to support National Health Service providers increase capacity in elective services, including for cancer treatment.

On 18 May 2022, I met with the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Radiotherapy to discuss a range of issues, including the backlog in cancer care. The meeting included radiotherapy professionals.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
9th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will (a) make a comparative assessment of the adequacy of respite support for carers in (i) England and (ii) Northern Ireland and (b) publish the findings from that assessment.

We have no plans to make an assessment. However, we will invest up to £25 million to improve the support provided to unpaid carers in England. We expect this funding will identify and test a range of new and existing interventions, which could include respite and breaks, peer group and wellbeing support. We will also work with the sector, including local authorities, to explore different models of respite, how respite services are accessed by carers and any barriers which carers may experience in accessing these services.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
12th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Social Care, what steps the NHS takes to monitor and review its funding of abortions carried out by third-party providers.

The information requested is not collected centrally. Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for commissioning abortion services and monitoring funding and contracts.

12th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how her Department (a) records and (b) reports on the allocation of NHS funding for abortion; and whether that information is presented in a searchable format.

The information requested is not collected centrally. Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for commissioning abortion services and monitoring funding and contracts.

12th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how NHS funding on abortion is recorded and reported by his Department; and whether that information is available in a searchable format.

The information requested is not collected centrally. Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for commissioning abortion services and monitoring funding and contracts.

12th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding the NHS has spent on repeat abortions over the last year.

The information requested is not collected centrally. Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for commissioning abortion services and monitoring funding and contracts.

12th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the NHS takes to ensure that the costs of abortion services provided on the NHS by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service are an accurate reflection of the costs involved.

The information requested is not held centrally. Contracting and funding abortion services and assurance of spend is a matter for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). It is for CCGs to take appropriate steps to ensure the costs of abortion services provided through the National Health Service by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service are an accurate reflection of the costs involved.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will supply a decision on behalf of the Government on each of the 25 recommendations made by the select committee on Health and Social Care in its Eighth Report, Children and Young People's Mental Health, HC 17, published on 9 December 2021; and if he will make a statement on that matter at the first available opportunity.

We welcome the Committee’s report. In our response to the Health and Social Care Committee’s report, we set out where we agreed with its recommendations or where we are taking forward the recommendations in part or in full. We will be considering the recommendations in full during the development of a new long term cross-Government plan for mental health. We are launching a wide-ranging discussion paper and call for evidence to support development of the plan. The Committee’s inquiry and evidence from witnesses will be considered during this process.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the introduction of the home abortion policy and Freedom of Information requests to NHS Trusts that have disclosed that women have been presenting with complications at a potentially higher rate than recorded in his Department's abortion statistics, if his Department will request data from NHS Trusts and Emergency Services on (a) the incidence of Retained Products of Conception and Evacuation of Retained Products of Conception following medical abortions over the last five years and (b) whether in each case, both abortion pills were taken at home or in a clinic.

Data on whether both pills are taken at home or in a clinic is collected through the statutory abortion forms that clinicians send to the Chief Medical Officer. Data for 2020 will be published later this year as part of the annual abortion statistics.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether medical devices benefit from the same grace period of medicines in terms of their transport to Northern Ireland from Great Britain; and what steps he is taking to ensure there are no interruptions to the supply of those devices to Northern Ireland.

Medical devices can continue to move into Northern Ireland without checks. Medical devices are goods marked with a conformity assessment marking – for example, the CE mark or UKCA mark, and are regulated under a different set of rules from medicines. As long as medical devices are compliant with the European Union acquis, they can be placed on the Northern Ireland market. Medical devices are not required to comply with the requirements of the EU Falsified Medicines Directive and they are not included in the grace period for medicines.

The Department, in consultation with the devolved administrations and Crown Dependencies, is working closely with the health and care system, suppliers and industry to put in place robust measures to help ensure the continued supply of medicines and medical devices to the whole of the United Kingdom, including Northern Ireland.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many women received Evacuation of Retained Products of Conception between 30 March and 30 November for this year after having (a) a home medical abortion and (b) a medical abortion where one or both pills were taken in a clinic.

This information is not collected or held centrally.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many women received Evacuation of Retained Products of Conception following a medical abortion between 30 March and 30 November for each of the last five years.

The information is not held in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department is offering to people who are required to self-isolate as a result of the Test and trace notification and who are only eligible for statutory sick pay.

The Test and Trace Support Payment is available in all local authorities in England. The Department works closely with the devolved administrations which run similar schemes.

To be eligible for the Test and Trace Support Payment, an individual must be employed or self-employed, unable to work from home, and currently receiving Universal Credit, Working Tax Credit, income-based Employment and Support Allowance, income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, Income Support, Housing Benefit and/or Pension Credit.

Where an individual is not in receipt of one of the qualifying benefits but meets the other eligibility criteria and may face financial hardship if they have to self-isolate, local authorities can make a £500 discretionary payment.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of false positive test results from covid-19 testing in England and Wales.

In June 2020 the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies published a briefing paper on the impact of false positives and false negatives in the United Kingdom’s COVID-19 reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing programme, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/gos-impact-of-false-positives-and-negatives-3-june-2020

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the Government has to test, track and trace people infected with covid-19.

We are developing an integrated contact tracing and testing programme to support the next phase of our COVID-19 response. The programme will combine innovative technology, an app which uses Bluetooth technology to detect proximity contacts between app users, with more traditional web and phone-based contact tracing techniques. Alongside this there will be swab testing for those reporting COVID-19 symptoms.

The contact tracing app is currently undergoing testing and we are recruiting 18,000 contact tracers to support the wider programme. This integrated programme will play an important role in helping us to minimise the spread of the virus in the future.

27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to support the mental health of NHS workers during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has commissioned NHS England and NHS Improvement to develop a comprehensive emotional, psychological and practical support package for all National Health Service staff during and after COVID-19 response.

This includes free access to well-being apps, a dedicated helpline and text service that offer support and confidential listening, and where appropriate signposting to other services that support staff welfare. A separate helpline is also now available offering bereavement support by a team of fully qualified bereavement specialists.

More information on how to access this support can be found online at the following link:

people.nhs.uk/help

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made on increasing staffing levels within the NHS in response to the Covid-19 outbreak.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, NHS England has published a suite of documents to support National Health Service organisations with the management of their workforce. All of the documents can be found on NHS England’s website at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/workforce/

The NHS has also run a campaign asking for recently retired doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals to return to practice. Further details can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/returning-clinicians/

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have signed up to volunteer through the NHS Volunteer Responders scheme to date.

Over 750,000 people have signed up to the NHS Volunteers Responders programme in England against an initial ask of 250,000 volunteers. 607,054 volunteers have completed the necessary identity checks to begin helping those most vulnerable, more than double the original target. As of 28 April, 63,683 tasks have been completed by volunteers.

The programme is now accepting self-referrals and hon. Members are also able refer vulnerable people to the programme to receive support from the NHS Volunteer Responders. This can be done by completing an online referral form via the Royal Voluntary Service (RVS) website or by calling the RVS call centre.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure people traveling into UK airports are not carriers of covid-19.

On 12 March 2020 the Prime Minister announced that the COVID-19 response was moving from the contain to delay phase. This phase has been initiated as there is now community transmission of the virus in the United Kingdom, i.e. transmission not directly related to travel; this has made interventions in ports of less relative importance. With the shift to the delay phase and commensurate policy changes the Public Health England port health approach has changed to a ‘warn and inform focus’.

27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure NHS providers have the financial support they need during the covid-19 outbreak.

We are taking significant steps to ease operational pressures and provide financial support to National Health Service providers, so they are able to focus on the response to the outbreak.

These include an additional payment for 2019-20 at year-end to reflect any initial costs reported due to COVID-19. Additionally, NHS England and NHS Improvement have suspended the operational planning process for 2020-21. In replacement, simplified block contracts have been agreed between commissioners and NHS providers which will guarantee a nationally calculated monthly payment, between the period 1 April 2020 to 31 July 2020 to cover costs.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made on ensuring NHS and care staff are able to access covid-19 tests in Northern Ireland.

National Health Service and care staff in Northern Ireland can book a test through the Government’s online self-referral portal, which allows them to register for a home test kit or to book a drive-through test at a regional test site. Three regional testing sites have been set up in Northern Ireland; in Belfast, Derry and Craigavon. We recognise that each devolved administration will have its own eligibility criteria and testing priorities in their region, however we are working closely to align our approaches.

27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking with UK companies to support the development of a vaccine for covid-19.

On 17 April 2020 the Government announced a new Vaccines Taskforce (VTF) to drive forward the rapid development and production of a COVID-19 vaccine.

The VTF is supporting efforts to rapidly develop a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as possible by providing industry and research institutions with the resources and support they need. This includes reviewing regulations and scaling up manufacturing, so that when a vaccine becomes available, it can be produced quickly and in mass quantities.

The taskforce is also working closely with the Bioindustry Association which has set up an industry-led group, to accelerate vaccine development and manufacturing.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made on ensuring adequate critical care capacity in hospitals in Northern Ireland during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department is working closely with the devolved administrations, coordinating and sharing information as appropriate, to ensure all four nations can respond to the challenges presented by COVID-19. Health is a devolved matter and the Northern Ireland Department of Health would be best placed to respond to questions regarding capacity in Northern Ireland hospitals.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the reported incident of arson on the Wad Medani Evangelical Presbyterian Church in Sudan.

The UK has consistently denounced all human rights violations that have taken place in Sudan since 15 April 2023 and secured a UN Human Rights Council resolution in October 2023 to establish a fact-finding mission for Sudan. According to the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), they have not observed a significant increase in the specific targeting or discrimination against any religious minorities because of their beliefs. We support OHCHR's continued monitoring of the situation in Sudan.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
26th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what recent assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of trends in the number of Christians arrested in Iran.

The UK condemns the continued persecution of religious minorities in Iran and is aware of the recent upsurge in arbitrary arrests of Christians. At the 78th UNGA, we co-sponsored the Iran Human Rights Resolution, calling for Iran to eliminate, in law and in practice, all forms of discrimination on the basis of thought, conscience, religion or belief. The UK is an active member of the International Religious Freedom or Belief Alliance, where we continue to call on Iran to uphold fundamental rights. We are committed to promoting religious freedom and will continue to work with partners to promote the rights of Christians in Iran. We also work with our international partners in multilateral fora.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, whether he has had recent discussions with his Nigerian counterpart on the attacks on Christians in Plateau State on 24 December 2023.

Rising insecurity in Nigeria has affected all faith and non-faith communities, including Christians. UK Government officials and I regularly raise freedom of religion or belief, including the impact of insecurity on communities and the need to bring perpetrators to justice, with the Nigerian Government. The British High Commissioner has raised the recent attacks in Plateau with the Nigerian National Security Adviser. The High Commissioner and his team continue to work closely with the respective authorities to raise and address these issues through multiple forums.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
15th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what recent assessment his Department has made of trends in the level of anti-Christian sentiment in Laos.

The UK is committed to promoting and defending Freedom of Religion or Belief (FoRB), as demonstrated by our hosting the 'International Ministerial Conference on Freedom of Religion or Belief' in July 2022. We also work through the UN to promote and protect these rights. The UK Embassy in Laos raises concerns about limitations on freedom of expression and other human rights issues, including freedom of religion, on a regular basis, both publicly and in private and last did this on 10 January 2024. I visited Laos in September 2023 and raised our concern over particular human rights cases with Laos Ministers. We also raise country specific human rights issues at the UN Human Rights Council.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will take steps to increase official development assistance funding for (a) water, (b) sanitation and (c) hygiene infrastructure in healthcare facilities to help tackle antimicrobial resistance.

The UK remains committed to supporting access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), including in healthcare facilities. The UK-funded Hygiene and Behaviour Change Coalition supported 14,800 facilities with WASH supplies and trained 460,000 health workers on hygiene improvements. We also help rally international attention on antimicrobial resistance through the global taskforce on WASH in Healthcare Facilities, working with World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and other partners. The Statistics on International Development publication confirmed that UK bilateral Official Development Assistance (ODA) spend on WASH totalled £46 million in 2022. Multilateral spend on WASH was £63 million in 2021. At this stage we are unable to confirm FCDO's future allocations to WASH.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
11th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what proportion of the Official Development Assistance budget is spent on improving in water, sanitation and hygiene infrastructure in refugee camps (a) in sub-Saharan Africa and (b) globally.

The UK remains committed to protecting the lives and dignity of those in need of humanitarian assistance, including refugees, through providing safe and sustainable access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). Our total Official Development Assistance spending on WASH in 2021 was £78 million through bilateral delivery and an estimated £63 million through multilateral delivery. The latest published and finalised data is available on GOV.UK in Statistics on International Development: final UK aid spend 2021 [https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-on-international-development-final-uk-aid-spend-2021]. We will continue to provide life-saving food and emergency health services, shelter, water, and hygiene services to refugee camps and vulnerable host communities.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
20th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 24 April 2023 to Question 181199 on Development Aid: Genito-urinary Medicine, whether his Department has considered the potential merits of monitoring the (a) level of (i) complications and (ii) mortality during (A) abortion and (B) childbirth, (b) quality of aftercare for women following (1) abortion and (2) childbirth and (c) other outcomes associated with services (x) partly and (y) wholly funded from sexual and reproductive health rights funds.

The UK is proud to defend and promote universal and comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), including safe abortion and maternal healthcare. The UK uses sexual and reproductive health funds to support services in a range of ways including technical assistance, funding drugs and supplies and delivering services directly, working through NGOs, governments and UN agencies. Examples include the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Supplies Partnership programme and the Global Financing Facility. The risk of complications without these services in place is extremely high. The UK monitors the work of our partners through annual reviews that assess progress against a set of indicators but also assess risk. Information on the monitoring of each of the UK's SRHR programmes can be found on DevTracker.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 24 April 2023 to Question 181199 on Development Aid: Genito-urinary Medicine, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of monitoring the level of funding that is allocated to (a) overseas abortion services and (b) supporting pregnant women and children overseas.

FCDO tracks funding for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services, including safe abortion services. However, as FCDO takes an integrated approach to our programming on sexual and reproductive health and rights, it is not possible to give a specific figure for our funding for the provision of safe abortion services.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
12th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much the Government has provided to the Safe Abortion Action Fund in each of the past five years.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office has provided the following to the Safe Abortion Action Fund in each of the past five years; £0 in 2017/18, £0 in 2018/19, £1 million 2019/20, £1 million 20/21 and £0.8 million 21/22. Available on the development tracker: https://devtracker.fcdo.gov.uk/projects/GB-GOV-1-300875/transactions

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions she has had with her EU counterpart on the impact of the Northern Ireland Protocol on Northern Ireland trade.

On 21 February, my Rt Hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary and Vice President Maroš Šefčovič co-chaired the Ninth Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee in Brussels.

The Protocol is not working for the people of Northern Ireland and is threatening political stability. The EU needs to show flexibility to urgently resolve the issues to protect the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
2nd Mar 2021
What policies he plans to implement in response to the Shawcross Report on UK victims of Qadhafi-sponsored IRA terrorism.

I express my deepest sympathies to UK victims of Qadhafi-sponsored IRA terrorism, and all victims of Troubles.

This is an important issue; and I recognise this House takes a close interest.

Ministers across Government are carefully considering the internal scoping report Mr Shawcross has produced in order to do justice to the important and sensitive issues it covers, giving due respect to the victims.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what his planned timescale is for the (a) consideration and (b) publication of the (i) scoping and (ii) final report of William Shawcross on Qadhafi-sponsored IRA terrorism.

The Government is carefully considering the internal scoping report that Mr Shawcross has produced in order to do justice to the important, complex and sensitive issues it covers.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the income to the public purse was for VAT payments from Northern Ireland in each of the last five years, broken down by sector.

The information requested is not available. HM Revenue and Customs holds data for VAT receipts disaggregated between England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland up to the financial year 2018-2019 but not beyond this date and not on a sector breakdown basis. There are ONS statistics on the VAT that could be attributed to Northern Ireland for later years, but again this cannot be broken down by sector.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that traders in Northern Ireland do not pay double VAT on goods purchased in the UK.

For the majority of businesses trading with and in Northern Ireland, VAT continues to be accounted for in much the same way as when trading with the rest of the UK.

The government is confident that its implementation of the Northern Ireland Protocol for VAT mitigates the risk of double taxation in Northern Ireland.

Northern Ireland is, and will remain, part of the UK’s VAT system.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
12th Oct 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he intends to announce changes to the rates of (a) Income Tax, (b) National Insurance, (c) VAT and (d) excise duties in the (i) Spring Budget 2023 or (ii) Medium-Term Fiscal Plan on 31 October 2022.

The Chancellor has announced that the measures in the Growth Plan 2022 to freeze Alcohol Duty and introduce a VAT-free shopping scheme for international tourists will not be taken forward. In addition, the basic rate of Income Tax will remain at 20% indefinitely.

The government will set out further reforms to improve fiscal sustainability at the Medium-Term Fiscal Plan on 31 October.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish the sales figures for hospitality broken down by (a) food, (b) alcohol and (c) non-alcoholic drinks in each month since the introduction of the reduction in VAT.

The information is not available. Most businesses submit VAT returns to HM Revenue and Customs quarterly, and quarterly returns are for differing accounting periods. Businesses are not required to provide figures for different products or services on their VAT returns, as this would impose an excessive administrative burden.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has undertaken an assessment of the effect of the reduction in VAT on the hospitality sector.

In order to support the cash flow and viability of about 150,000 businesses and to protect over 2.4 million jobs, the Government has applied a temporary reduced rate of VAT (5 per cent) to goods and services supplied by the tourism and hospitality sectors, which will now end on 30 September 2021. On 1 October 2021, a new reduced rate of 12.5 per cent will be introduced for these goods and services to ease affected businesses back to the standard rate. The new rate will end on 31 March 2022.

This relief is estimated to be worth over £7 billion to the tourism and hospitality sectors.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate the Office of Financial Sanctions has made of the aggregate value of Libyan frozen funds held by UK institutions in the past 10 years.

Since its establishment in 2016, the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) has undertaken an annual frozen asset review, requiring all persons or institutions that hold or control frozen assets in the UK to report to OFSI, from which the following figures are taken.

The figures are each an approximate total value of frozen Libyan assets in the UK. The figures for the 2020 Frozen Asset Review are still being finalised, and will be published in OFSI’s Annual Review later this year.

September 2017 £12.061 billion

September 2018 £11.222 billion

September 2019 £11.809 billion

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much interest has been generated from frozen Libyan assets held in the UK in each of the last 10 years.

The Treasury does not hold information on the total interest that has accrued on Libyan frozen assets.

The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) undertakes an annual frozen asset review requiring all persons or institutions that hold or control frozen funds in the UK to report to OFSI. OFSI’s published Annual Review provides an aggregate figure for the value of Libyan frozen funds held by UK institutions. However, there is no requirement for banks to report interest separately in the annual returns on frozen assets they provide to OFSI.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether businesses in the retail supply chain are eligible for business rates relief.

This year the Government has provided an unprecedented business rates holiday for eligible retail, hospitality and leisure properties due to the direct adverse effects of COVID-19, worth about £10 billion, and has frozen the business rates multiplier for all businesses for 2021-22.

Business rates are devolved in Northern Ireland and so are a matter for the Northern Ireland Executive.

19th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to extend the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme for the travel sector.

The Government has been clear that as the economy reopens, the Government will support people back into work. On 12 May, the Government announced that the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) would be extended for four months, until the end of October.

On 29 May, the Chancellor announced plans for introducing employer contributions into the CJRS, while ensuring that employees continue to receive 80% of regular wages while furloughed.

In June and July, the Government will pay 80% of wages up to a cap of £2,500 as well as employer National Insurance Contributions (ER NICs) and pension contributions for the hours the employee does not work. Employers will have to pay employees for the hours they work.

In August, the Government will pay 80% of wages up to a cap of £2,500 and employers will pay ER NICs and pension contributions for the hours the employee does not work.

In September, the Government will pay 70% of wages up to a cap of £2,187.50 for the hours the employee does not work. Employers will pay ER NICs and pension contributions and 10% of wages to make up the 80% total, up to a cap of £2,500.

In October, the Government will pay 60% of wages up to a cap of £1,875 for the hours the employee does not work. Employers will pay ER NICs and pension contributions and 20% of wages to make up the 80% total, up to a cap of £2,500.

The cap will be proportional to the hours not worked.

19th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Government has made an assessment of the potential merits of introducing conditions, similar to those in place for Jersey, to allow Northern Ireland operators to sell duty free products along with the rest of the UK to EU member states once the transition period has ended.

The Government continues to work through the implications of the Northern Ireland Protocol.

The Government is committed to providing guidance on how the NI Protocol will work, including for duty-free goods, ahead of the end of the transition period.

19th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment the Government has made of the future duty free implications for Northern Ireland; and what steps the Government is taking to ensure Northern Irish operators are not adversely affected once the transition period has ended.

The Government continues to work through the implications of the Northern Ireland Protocol.

The Government is committed to providing guidance on how the NI Protocol will work, including for duty-free goods, ahead of the end of the transition period.

1st May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, what plans he has to end that scheme after the covid-19 outbreak; and whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of enabling businesses to take employees out of furlough in the event that demand for services increases.

The Government has extended the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme until October 2020. Extending the scheme in its current form until July will provide workers, businesses and the economy with clarity on this vital support. After July, the Government will introduce more flexibility to the furlough scheme in a measured way that protects people’s incomes and helps support furloughed employees as they return to work. From August through to the end of October, employers currently using the scheme will have more flexibility to bring their furloughed employees back to work part-time while still receiving support from the scheme. Employers using the scheme will start contributing some of the costs of their workers’ salaries, substituting in part the contribution that the Government is currently making. The Government will outline more details of how this will work by the end of May.

7th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether any guidance has been given to police forces on how they should advise victims of crime to report (a) making off without payment, (b) shoplifting and (c) any other particular types of crime.

The Government is clear that all crimes, when they take place, should be reported to the police so they can be investigated appropriately.

This Government is giving the police the powers they need to stop crimes from happening in the first place, including through supporting them to roll out a range of interventions, such as practical crime prevention advice, improved CCTV and street lighting through our Safer Streets Fund.

Partnership working between businesses and the police is vital to ensuring an effective response to crimes like shoplifting and making off without payment. The Home Office works closely with the police and other crime prevention partners like Police Crime Prevention Initiatives (PCPI) and the National Business Crime Centre (NBCC), to ensure we are consistently getting the basics right and to encourage the sharing of best practice, including reiterating the value of taking Victim and Business Impact Statements.

It is for individual Chief Constables and Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) as operational leaders and locally elected representatives to decide how best to deploy resources, manage and respond to individual crimes and local crime priorities.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the status of the Muslim brotherhood is in the UK as of 23 June 2022.

The Government keeps under review the views promoted and activities undertaken by the Muslim Brother-hood’s associates in the UK in accordance with the five commitments included in the former Prime Minister’s statement to Parliament.

The Government will consider any new evidence on the Muslim Brotherhood’s activities against the UK’s legal thresholds, including whether they meet the test for proscription under the Terrorism Act 2000.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she (a) has made a recent assessment and (b) plans to make an assessment of the potential merits of proscribing the Muslim brotherhood.

The Government does not routinely comment on intelligence matters, including whether an organisation is under consideration for proscription.

The Government keeps the list of proscribed organisations under review.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
22nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the annual cost to the public purse is for housing migrants within hotels in Northern Ireland.

The Home Office does not provide accomodation to migrants to the UK.

The Home Office does though have a statutory obligation to provide accommodation and other support to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute while their application for asylum is being considered.

The total expenditure on asylum is published in the Home Office Annual Report and Accounts, available at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ho-annual-reports-and-accounts.

We do not publish a breakdown of costs of our accommodation & support contracts by location or property type as such detail is considered commercially sensitive.

27th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with her Irish counterpart on tackling extremism.

The Home Secretary has engaged with the Irish Government as part of a wider dialogue, but not to specifically discuss extremism.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
19th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has an agreement in place with the Republic of Ireland on air defence cover.

I am withholding any response to questions on other nation's sovereign airspace access, as these should be for the nation in question to answer; therefore any further questions on Irish airspace should be directed to the Government of Ireland.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
19th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many times the RAF has been deployed to intercept aircraft in Republic of Ireland airspace in each of the last three years.

There have been no instances over the last three years of RAF aircraft being deployed to intercept aircraft within the airspace of the Republic of Ireland.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
7th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what his Department’s policy is on UK military aircraft entering the airspace of the Republic of Ireland for operational purposes.

UK Military aircraft do not enter the sovereign airspace of Ireland for operational purposes, without the express prior agreement of the Irish Government. The RAF polices the UK Flight Information Region (FIR) on behalf of NATO and the international community and would only enter foreign national airspace when authorised to do so. Questions on sovereign airspace access and associated regulations are for individual nations to answer, therefore any questions on Irish airspace should be directed to the Irish Government.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
15th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if he will make an estimate of the amount raised by local councils in parking fines in each year from 2019.

Local authorities regular annual Revenue Outturn data returns for England include reporting their income from Penalty Charge Notices relating to on-street parking. These data are published for England here.

For councils in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, the respective devolved administrations may hold this information.

22nd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on the movement of livestock between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK.

The Windsor Framework respects that for decades the island of Ireland has been treated as a single epidemiological unit, meaning that there have been additional requirements for the movement of livestock. These include identification requirements, health certificates and the physical inspection of animals by vets.

In 2021, technical easements were agreed with the EU to simplify livestock moving between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Defra is working closely with the livestock sector to ensure movements can continue with as little friction as possible.

Steve Baker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what the current status is of the outstanding (a) development proposals affecting integrated schools and (b) other Northern Ireland Department of Education development proposals.

Development proposals affecting schools in Northern Ireland is a devolved matter, under the responsibility of the Northern Ireland Department of Education (NIDoE).

A full list of development proposals and their live status is available on the NIDoE website at: https://www.education-ni.gov.uk/articles/current-development-proposals.

Steve Baker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
14th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, whether the Government has allocated funds to celebrate the formation of the Royal Ulster Constabulary in 2022 in the context of the series of celebratory events planned in the Republic of Ireland.

No funding has been allocated by the Government to mark this year’s centenary of the formation of the RUC. Events in Northern Ireland have been arranged locally and by the RUCGC Foundation. Further information may be sought from the PSNI, the RUCGC Foundation or the Department of Justice.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what estimate he has made of the number of false positive test results from covid-19 testing in Northern Ireland.

The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and I are working closely with the First Minister, deputy First Minister and the rest of the Executive on the response to Covid-19.

As my honourable Friend will be aware, health is a devolved matter. In May, the Department of Health published the Covid-19 Test, Trace and Protect Strategy, which is led by the Public Health Agency.

Testing has always been a critical part of the UK’s response. The Testing Strategy in Northern Ireland is aligned with the UK strategic approach, and through working with a number of key stakeholders and delivery partners across the Health and Social Care Sector, local universities and industry, testing capacity has increased significantly.

As with any diagnostic test there is always the small possibility of a false negative or a false positive result. All tests have been assessed as performing to manufacturers’ specifications before being used.


8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, with reference to page 44 of the document entitled New Decade, New Approach, published in January 2020, which states that the Renewable Heat Incentive scheme will be closed down, whether the required £60 to £600 million compensation is included in the associated finance package.

The New Decade, New Approach agreement included a commitment to close down the existing RHI scheme and replace it with a scheme that effectively cuts carbon emissions in Northern Ireland. This pledge was part of text about the programme for government for the new Executive and not a UK Government commitment.

To support the new Executive, UKG has guaranteed at least £1bn of Barnett-based funding to support investment, alongside £1bn of new resource and capital spending. This funding is not intended to absorb the costs to the Executive of the RHI voluntary buy-out scheme and/or addressing financial hardship experienced by scheme participants as a result of adjusted RHI tariffs.

3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, if he will make an assessment of the implications for the Government's policy of the Northern Ireland Assembly opposing the extension of abortion regulations to Northern Ireland.

The Northern Ireland Assembly has not opposed the Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020.

The debate in the Assembly on 2 June 2020 was focused on one aspect of those regulations, severe fetal impairment, and does not have any binding effects on the Regulations we have made.

As abortion remains a devolved issue in Northern Ireland, the Assembly remains able to legislate on abortion, subject to the usual Assembly and other procedures, including compliance with the European Convention on Human Rights. The UK Government will continue to ensure we abide by our domestic and international legal obligations.