Paul Bristow Portrait

Paul Bristow

Conservative - Peterborough

First elected: 12th December 2019


Electronic Trade Documents Bill [HL]
14th Jun 2023 - 19th Jun 2023
Data Protection and Digital Information (No. 2) Bill
3rd May 2023 - 23rd May 2023
Ballot Secrecy Bill [HL]
1st Mar 2023 - 7th Mar 2023
Online Safety (Re-committed Clauses and Schedules) Bill
7th Dec 2022 - 15th Dec 2022
Health and Social Care Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 23rd May 2022
Elections Bill
15th Sep 2021 - 26th Oct 2021


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Paul Bristow has voted in 927 divisions, and 8 times against the majority of their Party.

1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Paul Bristow voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Paul Bristow voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
22 Jun 2022 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Paul Bristow voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 61 Conservative No votes vs 106 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 70
7 Mar 2023 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
Paul Bristow voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 107 Conservative Aye votes vs 109 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 299
10 Jan 2024 - Economic Activity of Public Bodies (Overseas Matters) Bill - View Vote Context
Paul Bristow voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Conservative No votes vs 279 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 235
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Paul Bristow voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 57 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 58 Noes - 525
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Paul Bristow voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 58 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 68 Noes - 529
17 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Paul Bristow voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 59 Conservative Aye votes vs 266 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 536
View All Paul Bristow Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Independent)
(14 debate interactions)
Cat Smith (Labour)
(12 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(10 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(72 debate contributions)
Home Office
(36 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(35 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Elections Act 2022
(3,611 words contributed)
Ballot Secrecy Act 2023
(2,210 words contributed)
Health and Care Act 2022
(2,135 words contributed)
Health and Social Care Levy Act 2021
(1,772 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Paul Bristow's debates

Peterborough Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the UK to be neutral in the conflict between Israel and Palestine, and withdraw offers of support for Israel.

We want the Government to seek a ceasefire and also seek to address the root cause of the current conflict by promoting dialogue and advocating for the end of Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

The UK Government should urge the Israeli Government to stop the blockade of Food, Fuel and Electricity to the already impoverished city of Gaza

We want the Government to repeal the Dangerous Dogs Act and replace it with legislation that focuses on early intervention to prevent dog bites and tackle dog-related issues regardless of breed or type, based solely on their behaviour.


I believe that the XL bully is a kind, beautiful natured breed that loves children and people in general, and are very loyal and loving pets.

The Government should create an emergency fund to deal with the massive waiting lists for autism & ADHD assessments for children AND adults. This would provide resources for local health services deal with current waiting lists and new patients.

The Government should commission a review of how Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) assessments are managed by the NHS, including through Shared Care Agreements, and increase funding to reduce waiting times.

The Government must make a public statement on the #kissanprotests & press freedoms.

India is the worlds largest democracy & democratic engagement and freedom of the press are fundamental rights and a positive step towards creating a India that works for all.

I would like the government to review and increase the pay for healthcare workers to recognise the work that they do.

To revoke the Immigration Health Surcharge increases for overseas NHS staff. The latest budget shows an increase of £220 a year for an overseas worker to live and work in the UK, at a time when the NHS, and UK economy, relies heavily on them.

We would like the government to support and regard social care: financially, publicly and systematically on an equal par as NHS. We would like parliament to debate how to support social care during COVID-19 and beyond so that it automatically has the same access to operational and financial support.

Give NHS workers who are EU and other Nationals automatic UK citizenship if they stay and risk their own lives looking after the British people during the COVID crisis.


Latest EDMs signed by Paul Bristow

26th March 2024
Paul Bristow signed this EDM on Monday 15th April 2024

Referral of matters of 21 February 2024 to the Committee of Privileges

Tabled by: William Wragg (Independent - Hazel Grove)
That this House notes the Speaker’s decision on selection and calling of amendments on 21 February 2024 was not in accordance with the established precedent for Opposition days; and accordingly considers that, notwithstanding the Resolution of this House of 6 February 1978, the matter of whether undue pressure was placed …
70 signatures
(Most recent: 17 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 42
Conservative: 24
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 1
21st February 2024
Paul Bristow signed this EDM on Wednesday 28th February 2024

No confidence in the Speaker

Tabled by: William Wragg (Independent - Hazel Grove)
That this House has no confidence in Mr Speaker.
91 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 43
Scottish National Party: 41
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Workers Party of Britain: 1
View All Paul Bristow's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Paul Bristow, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Paul Bristow has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Paul Bristow

Thursday 1st October 2020

2 Bills introduced by Paul Bristow


A Bill to make provision about the approval of remuneration paid to local government employees.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 1st March 2024

A Bill to make provision about the advertising of waste disposal services; to require local authorities to issue fixed penalty notices under section 34 of the Environment Act 1990 in certain circumstances; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 26th March 2024
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 17th May 2024

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps the Government is taking to help ensure that disabled people with assistance dogs are not discriminated against when using hotels.

In common with all businesses offering services to the public, hotels are required not to discriminate against their disabled customers and must make reasonable adjustments, such as permitting guide dogs. This duty is “anticipatory”, meaning that hotels, for example, should expect a proportion of their guests to be sight impaired and make appropriate arrangements - for example setting aside a “dog friendly” room for such guests. The failure of a hotel to make a reasonable adjustment would be unlawful under the Equality Act 2010 and would open the hotel up to legal action by the guide dog owner or their representative.

Before considering any legal action, a disabled person who may have been personally discriminated against because of a disability may contact The Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS), the government helpline established to provide free bespoke advice and in-depth support to individuals with discrimination concerns. The EASS can be contacted via their website - http://www.equalityadvisoryservice.com/, by telephone on 0808 8000082 or text phone on 0808 8000084. The EASS has the ability to intervene on an individual’s behalf with a service provider to help resolve an issue. The EASS can also advise people who wish to take their complaint further on their options.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people have died by suicide in each month since January 2019.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps is his Department taking to support the Xlinks Morocco-UK Power Project.

The Government continues to assess the best options for supporting its decarbonisation commitments, including international projects.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she plans to open a third phase of the youth investment fund.

The Government recognises the vital role that youth services and activities play in improving the life chances and wellbeing of young people.

While local authorities are responsible for delivering youth provision, the Government has worked closely with local authorities to update statutory guidance to support this delivery. The Government additionally provides significant funding to support youth services, with over £1.1 billion provided to the youth sector from DCMS in England between 2015 and 2021.

Over this Spending Review Period, DCMS is investing over £500 million in youth services to deliver the National Youth Guarantee, a government commitment that by 2025, every young person will have access to regular clubs and activities, adventures away from home and opportunities to volunteer. This includes a significant number of interventions such as the Youth Investment Fund which is delivering grants to build, renovate and expand youth centres. Future funding commitments for the Youth Investment Fund beyond the current phase 2 will be subject to the next Spending Review Period.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the (a) Football Association and (b) his counterparts in the devolved administrations on the prospects for relaunching the British Home Football Championship.

The Government has not had any recent discussions with the FA or Devolved Administrations about a British Home Football Championship. Whilst our love of the sport unites the home nations, international fixtures are a matter for the relevant football authorities.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the (a) progress of the roll-out of full fibre digital infrastructure in the Peterborough constituency in the last 12 months and (b) progress towards nationwide full fibre coverage by 2025 and (c) the need to update the Future Telecoms Infrastructure Review.

According to ThinkBroadband, full-fibre coverage in the Peterborough constituency stands at 47%, compared to 29% in July 2019.

The Government remains committed to delivering nationwide gigabit connectivity as soon as possible. We support industry’s plans to deliver gigabit broadband to the most commercial parts of the UK (c.80% of the country) and will continue to take action to remove barriers to deployment to help them deliver this by 2025.

It is more challenging to deliver gigabit connectivity to the hardest to reach 20% of the country by 2025. This is why we have committed a record £5 billion of capital funding to
support deployment in these areas.

30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has provided (a) support and (b) guidance to escape room businesses during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government’s economic support measures have helped a wide range of visitor attractions through this crisis. Escape room businesses can continue to access schemes such as the extended Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme, the Bounce Back Loans scheme. Certain retail, leisure and hospitality businesses are also eligible for business rates relief and grants.

Indoor attractions will be permitted to reopen from 4 July, so long as they can do so in line with COVID-19 Secure guidelines for the Visitor Economy. People should only visit indoor attractions within their household group (or support bubble) or with one other household (or support bubble).

We have worked very closely with the tourism sector to develop Covid-secure guidance which will help visitor economy businesses reopen safely.


Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure a sustainable future for radio.

While radio stations across the UK are reporting increasing numbers of listeners tuning in to their broadcasts, many of these stations are operating against the backdrop of a rapid fall in advertising and other revenues due to the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

Commercial radio stations have been able to take advantage of some of the unprecedented support measures that have been introduced across the wider economy, such as the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Bounce Back Loan Scheme. However, we acknowledge that commercial radio also faces some sector-specific pressures.

We are pleased that an agreement has now been reached with Arqiva that will result in a significant reduction in annual transmission costs for local commercial stations that use Arqiva’s services, and have worked with industry during this crisis to support efforts to reduce other costs. We note in particular the help secured by Radiocentre in the form of reduced music licensing payments to reflect the fall in stations’ revenues, and Ofcom’s announcement relaxing its enforcement of licensees’ programming and production requirements, which has been extended to December.

We have also worked with Ofcom to release emergency funding, through the Community Radio Fund, to help community radio stations continue to provide programming and outreach projects for the communities they serve. Ofcom announced details of 81 awards on 4 June.

We note that Ofcom plan to begin advertising small-scale multiplex licences later this year, which will provide a lower-cost digital transmission option for smaller stations, and we will shortly be publishing our response to our consultation on analogue commercial radio licences.

We will continue to liaise with stakeholders across the industry regarding ways in which the Government can reduce regulatory burdens further to support radio through Covid-19 and beyond.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has plans to assist university students affected by marking and assessment boycotts.

Unlike some other education sectors where the government has taken part in negotiations with trade unions, universities are autonomous. They are therefore responsible for the pay and pension provision of their staff.

While government plays no formal role in such disputes, the department is deeply concerned about the impact of the marking and assessment boycott on students. It is unacceptable that students, many of whom have already suffered significant disruption to their studies over recent years, face further disruption and uncertainty. This disruption is particularly damaging to those students who are due to graduate and looking to enter the jobs market or progress to further study. The department has made clear that whatever the rights and wrongs of the current dispute, action that damages students' prospects is the wrong thing to do.

Our current understanding is that the vast majority of students have been unaffected by the industrial action and, in most cases, have received their full results on time, and progressed or graduated as normal. However, the department appreciates that, at some higher education (HE) providers, the impact of the boycott has been more significant.

This government believes students should be at the heart of the HE system. This is why the Office for Students (OfS) has been set up to regulate the HE sector in England, protect student rights and ensure the sector is delivering real value for money.  The OfS wrote to institutions affected by the boycott on 12 June to reiterate its expectations in relation to its conditions of registration. The OfS have also published guidance to students on their rights during industrial action and will continue to monitor this ongoing situation through their normal regulatory mechanisms.

I have held discussions with the Russell Group, Universities UK and the Universities and Colleges Employers Association (UCEA) to better understand the impact on students and the mitigating actions their members are taking to minimise disruption. I have also written to the Russell Group and Universities UK, encouraging them to continue to do everything within their powers to protect the interests of students during this phase of industrial action. On 11 August, I wrote to UCEA and the University and College Union (UCU) urging them both to resume negotiations which, if successful, will bring an end to the boycott and further industrial action.

Universities have worked to reduce the impact on students in a variety of ways, including reallocating marking to other staff members and hiring external markers. Moreover, many universities have awarded degrees when they have enough evidence of a student’s prior attainment to do so. Others have assigned provisional grades to students to allow them to progress, and, once all papers have been marked, most institutions will award degree classifications that either remain as provisionally assigned or are uplifted to reflect the student’s achievements.

The department strongly urges all parties involved in this industrial dispute to resume negotiations. We will continue to engage with the HE sector to help better understand how students’ interests can be protected during this time.

27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans her Department has to help children with (a) autism, (b) ADHD and (c) other neuro-diverse conditions in mainstream education.

In the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) improvement plan, the department set out our vision to improve mainstream education through setting standards for early and accurate identification of needs and timely access to support to meet those needs, including for autistic and neurodiverse children and young people. The standards will clarify the types of support that should be ordinarily available in mainstream settings, who is responsible for securing the support and from which budgets. The SEND and AP improvement plan can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/send-and-alternative-provision-improvement-plan.

The department will also develop new practice guides to support frontline professionals. The first three practice guides will be published by the end of 2025, focusing on advice for mainstream settings, and will include a practice guide on autism.

To support the needs of pupils with SEND, particularly in mainstream settings where most of these learners are educated, the department has funded the Universal Services programme. This programme, backed by almost £12 million, will help the school and further education workforce to identify and meet the needs of children and young people with SEND, including those with autism, earlier and more effectively. It will also help them successfully prepare children and young people for adulthood, including employment. The programme includes autism awareness training, which over 80,000 professionals have already undertaken.

Improving joined-up support is vital. The Department for Education is working closely with the Department for Health and Social Care on the cross-government Autism Strategy, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-strategy-for-autistic-children-young-people-and-adults-2021-to-2026/the-national-strategy-for-autistic-children-young-people-and-adults-2021-to-2026#improving-autistic-children-and-young-peoples-access-to-education-and-supporting-positive-transitions-into-adulthood-1. A key theme of this is improving autistic children and young people’s access to education and supporting positive transitions into adulthood.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to tackle cyber bullying in schools.

The department has sent a clear message to schools that bullying, including cyberbullying, for whatever reason, is unacceptable. It can have a devastating effect on individuals, harm their education, and have serious and lasting consequences for their mental health.

All schools are legally required to have a behaviour policy with measures to prevent all forms of bullying. They have the freedom to develop their own anti-bullying strategies appropriate to their environment and are held to account by Ofsted.

We recognise that bullying of any kind can now just as easily occur online as face-to-face. Cyberbullying can be a means by which face-to face-bullying is extended beyond the school day and by which bullying can start online and follow the child into school.

The department is providing over £3 million of funding between 10 August 2021 and 31 March 2024 to five anti-bullying organisations to support schools to tackle bullying. This includes projects targeting bullying of particular groups, such as those who are victims of hate related bullying and homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying.

In November 2018, the department published ’Respectful School Communities’, a self-review and signposting tool to support schools to develop a whole-school approach which promotes respect and discipline. This can combat bullying, harassment and prejudice of any kind, including sexual bullying and sexual harassment. It will help schools to identify the various elements that make up a whole school approach, consider gaps in their current practice, and get further support. Respectful School Communities is available at: https://www.educateagainsthate.com/resources/respectful-school-communities-self-review-signposting-tool-2/.

​We are also making sure that all children in England will learn about respectful relationships, in person and online, as part of new mandatory relationships, sex and health education (RSHE). These subjects are designed to give pupils the knowledge they need to lead happy, safe, and healthy lives and to foster respect for other people and difference, and to include teaching about online safety and harms.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps her Department is taking to tackle bullying in schools.

The department has sent a clear message to schools that bullying, including cyberbullying, for whatever reason, is unacceptable. It can have a devastating effect on individuals, harm their education, and have serious and lasting consequences for their mental health.

All schools are legally required to have a behaviour policy with measures to prevent all forms of bullying. They have the freedom to develop their own anti-bullying strategies appropriate to their environment and are held to account by Ofsted.

We recognise that bullying of any kind can now just as easily occur online as face-to-face. Cyberbullying can be a means by which face-to face-bullying is extended beyond the school day and by which bullying can start online and follow the child into school.

The department is providing over £3 million of funding between 10 August 2021 and 31 March 2024 to five anti-bullying organisations to support schools to tackle bullying. This includes projects targeting bullying of particular groups, such as those who are victims of hate related bullying and homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying.

In November 2018, the department published ’Respectful School Communities’, a self-review and signposting tool to support schools to develop a whole-school approach which promotes respect and discipline. This can combat bullying, harassment and prejudice of any kind, including sexual bullying and sexual harassment. It will help schools to identify the various elements that make up a whole school approach, consider gaps in their current practice, and get further support. Respectful School Communities is available at: https://www.educateagainsthate.com/resources/respectful-school-communities-self-review-signposting-tool-2/.

​We are also making sure that all children in England will learn about respectful relationships, in person and online, as part of new mandatory relationships, sex and health education (RSHE). These subjects are designed to give pupils the knowledge they need to lead happy, safe, and healthy lives and to foster respect for other people and difference, and to include teaching about online safety and harms.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
23rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will provide attainment data for deaf students at key stage 4 broken down by local authority for each of the last five years.

The Department reports on pupils with hearing impairments as follows in the attached Excel file.

10th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to help improve educational attainment by Romani children.

The department recognises the issues faced by Gypsy, Roma and Traveller children and young people and understands how schools can make a difference. While some Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils perform very well at school, as a group, their attainment and attendance at school is particularly low at every key stage of education.

The department understands that the most significant factor affecting pupil attainment, which cuts across all ethnicities, is economic disadvantage. That is why the department has continued to provide pupil premium funding and has increased the funding to over £2.5 billion in the 2021/22 financial year. The department has also reformed its funding system so that funding is distributed based on schools’ and pupils’ needs and characteristics. We have focused our education recovery funding on pupils most in need.

Schools serving pupils from Gypsy, Roma and Traveller backgrounds are likely to attract funding through additional needs factors in the schools national funding formula (NFF). This specifically includes the mobility factor, English as an additional language (EAL), and deprivation factors.

The NFF allocates 17%, or £6.7 billion of all funding in the 2022/23 financial year through additional needs factors based on deprivation, low prior attainment, EAL, and mobility. The total amount allocated through the deprivation factors in the NFF is increasing by £225 million, or 6.7%, in 2022/23. In addition, the 2022/23 schools supplementary grant will provide significant additional funding for deprivation.

The department wants to ensure all children and young people are able to reach their potential and experience the transformative effect of a high-quality education. We continue to support schools and leaders to respond to the needs of their schools and communities, including Gypsy, Roma and Traveller children.

11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish an Equality Impact Assessment of The Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2021.

The department completed both an equality impact assessment and a Children’s Rights Impact Assessment before introducing the Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2021, which will ban the placement of children under 16 in independent and semi-independent settings from September. We can confirm that the government will publish both documents shortly.

11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish a Child Rights Impact Assessment of The Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2021.

The department completed both an equality impact assessment and a Children’s Rights Impact Assessment before introducing the Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2021, which will ban the placement of children under 16 in independent and semi-independent settings from September. We can confirm that the government will publish both documents shortly.

2nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has issued to local authorities on the return of SEND pupils to school.

Supporting all children and young people and keeping them safe is the highest priority for the government, especially at this time. That is why, throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, educational settings have been asked to ensure that children and young people with education, health and care (EHC) plans can continue to attend where appropriate and, following a risk assessment, where their needs can be safely met in the educational environment.

Returning to normal educational routines as quickly as possible will be critical for children and young people’s education and wellbeing. From 1 June, we asked special educational settings to welcome back as many children and young people as could be safely catered for in their setting, based on their risk assessment as the primary deciding factor. In mainstream settings, we asked that children and young people with EHC plans in eligible year groups experience the same return to settings as their peers without EHC plans in the same year group, informed by their risk assessments. However, the prevalence of COVID-19 has decreased and the balance of risk is now overwhelmingly in favour of all children and young people, including those with special educational needs and disability (SEND), returning to their educational setting so that they can receive high-quality teaching and specialist professional care.

On 2 July, the government published detailed plans for schools and colleges that set out what is needed to plan for a full return of their pupils and students in September, including for special education settings. We have also updated the guidance for higher education providers on reopening university campuses.

The guidance has been developed with medical experts from Public Health England and we continue to work closely with the country’s best scientific and medical experts to ensure that children, young people and staff are as safe as possible. The guidance provides specific advice on approaches for reducing the risk of transmission as well as other operational considerations for educational settings to follow as they prepare for welcoming back all pupils and students with SEND in both mainstream and specialist settings.

The guidance for special educational settings can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-for-full-opening-special-schools-and-other-specialist-settings.

The guidance for mainstream settings is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

The guidance for further education settings is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-further-education-provision/what-fe-colleges-and-providers-will-need-to-do-from-the-start-of-the-2020-autumn-term.

The guidance for higher education settings is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses.

We will continue to work closely with special education settings, parents and carers, local authorities and other partner organisations ahead of September. For instance, we know that specific transport arrangements for children and young people with SEND will be critical. We will publish guidance for local authorities who provide dedicated school transport shortly.

9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to allocate addition and (a) funding and (b) resources to the provision of music teaching in schools in (i) England and (ii) in Peterborough constituency.

The Department believes that music is an important subject and that all pupils should receive a high-quality music education. The subject is compulsory in the national curriculum up to age 14.

To support schools to deliver high quality music education for all their pupils, the Government has provided funding of over £300 million for music education hubs across England between 2016 and 2020, including £76 million in 2019-20, and further funding to support hubs with the additional costs under the teachers’ pension scheme. This is a significant increase over the £58 million we gave hubs in 2014.

The Government recently announced a further year’s funding for music hubs, to help thousands more children learn to play musical instruments, as well as continued support for a range of smaller music and arts programmes, totalling £85 million. We will also be offering an ‘arts premium’ of £90 million each year for secondary schools in England from 2021 to fund enriching activities for all pupils.

Peterborough is served by the Peterborough Music Education Hub. In 2020-21, we will be providing the hub with over £360,000 of funding to continue to support the city’s schools to deliver high-quality music education. In 2016-17, the last year data for which data is available, the hub provided individual lessons to over 2,500 pupils, small group lessons for over 1,000 pupils and whole class ensemble teaching to over 3,300 pupils. The hub also supported or delivered 215 ensembles. The Government trusts that with this announced funding, this important work will continue, both in Peterborough and across England.

11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to improve air quality in (a) Peterborough and (b) the rest of the UK.

Local authorities are responsible for tackling air quality in their local communities. The landmark Environment Act 2021 enables greater local action on air pollution by improving the local air quality management framework in England.

The Act also introduces a clear duty to set two new targets for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) – the pollutant of most harm to health. Our dual-target approach will tackle the highest concentrations and ensure continuous improvement across the country.

The Government is taking robust and comprehensive action to improve air quality in the UK. We are working with local authorities to drive down levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) to within legal levels, supported by £880 million of funding to develop and implement plans, alongside Clean Air Fund grants to support those most impacted by these plans. In addition, we have committed £1.5 billion to support the early market and remove barriers to zero emission vehicles ownership. We have pledged a further £2.8 billion package of measures to support industry and consumers to make the switch to cleaner vehicles. In Summer 2020 the Prime Minister launched ambitious plans to boost walking and cycling in England, with a vision for half of all journeys in towns and cities to be cycled or walked by 2030. This commitment is backed with £2 billion of investment over five years.

The Clean Air Strategy sets out the comprehensive action that is required in England from across all parts of Government and society to meet our targets.

Air quality is a devolved policy the UK Government and the devolved administrations work collaboratively and consult on actions needed to improve air quality across the UK.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to publish his response to the consultation on the Introduction of a deposit return scheme in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Final details and next steps for the deposit return scheme will be presented in a Government response which will be published early next year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what data his Department holds on the charges made by local authorities for bulky household waste collections in England.

Defra does not collect information on the charges made by local authorities for bulky household waste collections in England.

However, Defra collects data on the tonnages of bulky residual waste collected by each reporting authority.

This information is published as part of Local Authority waste management statistics, available here: WasteDataFlow - Local Authority waste management on data.gov.uk

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans his Department has to collect information on the number of bulky household waste collections in England.

Defra does not collect information on the charges made by local authorities for bulky household waste collections in England.

However, Defra collects data on the tonnages of bulky residual waste collected by each reporting authority.

This information is published as part of Local Authority waste management statistics, available here: WasteDataFlow - Local Authority waste management on data.gov.uk

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what (a) financial and (b) other support he is giving to local authorities to (i) plant more trees and (ii) create new areas of woodland.

Defra supports tree planting in England through established mechanisms, almost all of which are available to Local Authorities and their partners if they can meet the rules of the scheme. These include the Woodland Creation Planning Grant, Woodland Carbon Fund, Countryside Stewardship and the Urban Tree Challenge Fund.

We have also announced a £640 million Nature for Climate Fund which will drive tree-planting in this parliament. Plans for that will be announced through a new England Tree Strategy, including how local authorities can access grant funding for tree planting and woodland management.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what plans she has to reach an agreement on investment with the Kingdom of Morocco.

Bilateral trade between the United Kingdom and Morocco was worth £1.8 billion in the four quarters to the end of Q3 2021, up £124 million on the same period the previous year. Our trade relationship is underpinned by the United Kingdom-Morocco Association Agreement. The Association Council met in December 2021 to discuss commercial opportunities and to establish a new trade sub-committee, tasked with identifying opportunities to enhance trade and investment and to address market access barriers.

The United Kingdom already has a Bilateral Investment Treaty with Morocco, which came into force in 2002. The Association Agreement, which came into effect on 1st January 2021, contains provisions on investment too.

23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she has taken to increase trade with the Kingdom of Morocco this year.

Bilateral trade between the United Kingdom and Morocco was worth £1.8 billion in the four quarters to the end of Q3 2021, up £124 million on the same period the previous year. Our trade relationship is underpinned by the United Kingdom-Morocco Association Agreement. The Association Council met in December 2021 to discuss commercial opportunities and to establish a new trade sub-committee, tasked with identifying opportunities to enhance trade and investment and to address market access barriers.

The United Kingdom already has a Bilateral Investment Treaty with Morocco, which came into force in 2002. The Association Agreement, which came into effect on 1st January 2021, contains provisions on investment too.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what representations she has made to her Indian counterpart on the Indian Government's non-compliance with international arbitration rulings in respect of (a) Cairn Energy, (b) Vodafone and (c) Devas Multimedia; and if she will make a statement.

It is a long-standing position of HM Government not to engage in ongoing legal proceedings under bilateral investment treaties (BITs) that we are not party to. Enforcement of an award made in favour of an investor by an international arbitral tribunal is a question for the investor, based on the options available to them under international law and relevant domestic legal procedures.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she plans to review the efficacy of provisions in the UK-India Bilateral Investment Treaty relating to independent international arbitration panels as a means of dispute resolution; and if she will make a statement.

HM Government has no plans to review the investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) provision in the United Kingdom-India Bilateral Investment Treaty (BIT). The BIT was unilaterally terminated in 2017, following notice of termination provided by the Government of India in 2016. The BIT contains a sunset clause, under which the provisions of the treaty, including the ISDS provision, continue to apply to investments made before its termination for a further 15 years.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate she has made of the additional UK investment in India which will result from a UK-India free trade agreement; and will she make a statement.

The United Kingdom has a strong investment relationship with India with around 400,000 jobs supported through investments in each other’s economies. In 2019, investment from the United Kingdom in India was worth £15.3 billion, a rise of over £800 million from 2018. At a virtual summit in May between my Rt hon. Friend the Prime Minister and Prime Minister Modi of India, Britain announced her intent to negotiate a comprehensive free trade agreement with India. For British businesses investing in India’s £2 trillion economy, or Indian businesses investing across the United Kingdom, a free trade agreement could offer improved access. On 25th May, my Department launched a consultation requesting input from consumers and businesses across all sectors that will help us craft a deal that boosts economic growth creating high-value jobs in every corner of the country.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to help tackle the backlog of people waiting for driving tests, in the context of test centre closures.

Since April 2021, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency has created over one million extra car test appointments by recruiting new examiners, conducting out-of-hours testing, such as on public holidays and weekends, asking all those qualified to conduct tests but who do not do so as part of their current day job, to return to conducting tests, and asking recently retired driving examiners to return. On average, this has created approximately 40,000 extra car test appointments each month.

As of 4 September 2023, there were 560,121 car practical driving tests booked, and 58,382 driving tests available within the 24-week booking window.

The DVSA is committed to providing its customers with the best service possible. The DVSA continually reviews its estate to ensure it represents good value for money and is efficient.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to improve road safety for young people in Cambridgeshire.

Responsibility for making decisions about the roads under its care including measures to protect the safety of road users, based on its knowledge of the area and taking into account local needs and considerations, rests with the local Traffic Authority.

The Department for Transport provides guidance to traffic authorities on various traffic management measures.

For young road users the Department’s broad aim is to improve road safety for young people through new technology and research; and particularly for young drivers, developing better learning opportunities and targeted educational messaging.

If there are any specific issues, I would be happy to meet the Hon. Member to discuss further.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
15th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an assessment of the (a) relevance and (b) applicability of the Ticketing and Settlement Agreement to railway services in 2022.

The Ticketing and Settlement Agreement sets out industry rules and practices relating to fares, ticketing, retail and the carriage of passengers. We are committed to modernising working practices, simplifing and improving passengers’ experience of buying tickets, and to ensure passengers get the support they need from staff when using the railways. Part of this will involve working with industry to consider how these practices should be governed in future.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department is taking steps to replace the Ticketing and Settlement Agreement.

The Ticketing and Settlement Agreement sets out industry rules and practices relating to fares, ticketing, retail and the carriage of passengers. We are committed to modernising working practices, simplifing and improving passengers’ experience of buying tickets, and to ensure passengers get the support they need from staff when using the railways. Part of this will involve working with industry to consider how these practices should be governed in future.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the new Consolidated Online Retail System for new rail retail provision will be procured by the Rail Delivery Group.

We are continuing to work with the sector, including the Rail Delivery Group, to tackle the challenges required by rail reform, including improving online retail for the benefit of passengers. This work will include further engagement with suppliers, and we will provide an update in due course.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to fully dual the A47; and what progress he is making in implementing those plans.

The second Road Investment Strategy will confirm the Government’s plans for the strategic road network. We expect this to be published before the start of the second Road Period on 1 April 2020. The first Road Investment Strategy has already committed over £300 million of investment in the A47, including three dualling schemes. Highways England has been developing these schemes and they are currently scheduled for a phased start of works, with the first construction starting in 2021.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what information his Department holds on the number of people with syndactyly that were awarded a personal independence payment in each of the last 5 years.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what guidance his Department has issued on (a) equality and (b) inclusion in the workplace for people with syndactyly.

The Department for Work and Pensions does not issue guidance on equality and inclusion in the workplace. However, the Government has a range of initiatives to support disabled people and people with health conditions, including syndactyly, to start, stay and succeed in work. These include increasing Work Coach support in Jobcentres; Disability Employment Advisers in Jobcentres; the Work and Health Programme and Intensive Personalised Employment Support; Access to Work grants; Disability Confident; the Information and Advice Service; and work to further join up employment and health systems.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the (a) administrative cost and (b) effectiveness of the 25 pence addition to the state pension for pensioners aged 80 and above.

Age addition payments are made automatically as part of the person’s ongoing State Pension entitlement. The administration costs are therefore negligible.

The age addition should be considered alongside the range of other measures and benefits that are available to pensioners over age 80. These include Pension Credit which can top up a pensioner’s income to a minimum of £177.10 a week for single pensioners and £270.30 for couples and provide access to a range of other benefits such as help with rent, council tax, energy bills and, for those aged 75 or over, a free television license. Moreover, households with a person aged 80 or over receive a Winter Fuel Payment of £300, instead of the standard Winter Fuel Payment of £200 for households with a pensioner below that age.

The age addition is only payable to those who reached State Pension age before 6 April 2016 – it is not paid to those receiving the new State Pension.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that people with (a) disabilities and (b) long-term conditions and (c) arthritis are supported (i) to work from home and (ii) when returning to work during the covid-19 outbreak.

Recognising the additional challenges Covid-19 may produce for people who have a disability or health condition, Access to Work has introduced a number of measures to support disabled people and those with a health condition whether they are working in the workplace, working from home, or returning to work.

During the pandemic Access to Work has been keen to support the use of assistive technology and where necessary has adapted existing awards to meet new working environments. This could include switching from face to face British Sign Language Interpreting to Video Remote Interpreting services where possible as well as making greater use of assistive technology and software.

In addition, to reflect concerns raised by stakeholders Access to Work has introduced and following measures:

  • Accepting email claim forms from customers who request this as a reasonable adjustment;
  • Accepting employer and support worker signatures via email;
  • Extending Support Worker awards that are coming to an end by 6 months;
  • Extending the timeframe customers have to submit payment claim forms to 9 months;
  • Adapting the way our assessments are undertaken to support customers who don’t know what support they need and/or where coping strategies are required as part of the Mental Health Support Service;
  • Flexing support and supporting the moving of special aids and equipment from the workplace to home, and providing new equipment for employees working from home where necessary; and
  • Prioritising new applications from key workers and those with jobs starting within the next 4 weeks.
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many additional people with (a) a disability, (b) long-term health conditions and (c) arthritis have been supported by the Access to Work Scheme since the covid-19 lockdown.

Access to Work continues to provide practical and financial support for people who have a disability or a health condition and require reasonable adjustments which are beyond standard adjustments an employer is required to provide.

Information about Access to Work can be found in the Official Access to Work Statistics which are published annually and can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/access-to-work-statistics-april-2007-to-march-2019.

The figures which relate to number of people who received an Access to Work payment this year will be available in the future Access to Work publication. Under the Code of Practice for Statistics the figures for 2020/21 cannot be released ahead of the official publication of the Access to Work Statistics. For this reason, it is not possible to provide the aggregated figures you have requested. This year’s statistics are due to be published in September 2021, and when published can be found using the link provided.

The Access to Work Statistics report the number of people who have received at least one Access to Work payment in a given financial year. Table 8 of the statistics in particular shows the number of people who have received an Access to Work payment broken down by primary medical condition (PMC). Disability, long-term health conditions and arthritis are not classed as individual PMC’s, and these conditions are recorded under the PMC categories.

To support disabled people to retain, adapt and move into employment during the pandemic, Access to Work has introduced a package of measures. These are:

  • Accepting email claim forms from customers who request this as a reasonable adjustment;
  • Accepting employer and support worker signatures via email;
  • Extending Support Worker awards that are coming to an end by 6 months;
  • Extending the timeframe customers have to submit payment claim forms to 9 months;
  • Adapting the way our assessments are undertaken to support customers;
  • Flexing support and supporting the moving of special aids and equipment from the workplace to home, and providing new equipment for employees working from home where necessary; and
  • Prioritising new applications from key workers and those with jobs starting within the next 4 weeks.
21st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence's evaluation processes complement the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency's International Recognition Procedure.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and is responsible for the processes that it uses, in the development of its recommendations on new medicines. The NICE will continue aiming to publish guidance on new medicines within 90 days of the receipt of a United Kingdom marketing authorisation, and is working closely with the Department, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, industry, and system partners to ensure that it is able to make timely recommendations on new medicines licensed through the International Recognition Procedure.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the NHS is taking to fund Baricitinib for the treatment of severe alopecia areata.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body responsible for developing evidence-based guidance for the National Health Service on whether medicines represent a clinically and cost-effective use of resources. The NHS in England is legally required to fund medicines recommended in a NICE appraisal, usually within three months of final guidance.

NICE published final draft guidance on 18 May 2023 which does not recommend baricitinib for the treatment of severe alopecia areata. An appeal has been made against NICE’s final draft guidance by Alopecia UK which will be considered by NICE’s appeal panel on 12 September 2023. NICE will issue final guidance in due course.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support is available specifically for people with cancer who experience long waits for treatment.

The Government is working with NHS England to reduce waiting times for cancer treatments and to ensure support is available for those that are wating for treatment. The Government and the National Health Service are committed to ensuring that all cancer patients get access to a Holistic Needs Assessment and Personalised Care Interventions. These will ensure care focuses on what matters most to each person, whilst empowering them to self-manage where appropriate and providing a route back into the system if they notice any worrying changes or need to seek help.

NHS England is providing over £390 million in cancer service development funding to Cancer Alliances in each of the next two years to support the delivery of priorities in cancer, including working to ensure that every person receives personalised care and support from cancer diagnosis onwards.

The NHS is supporting adults with the NHS Talking Therapies which provides evidence-based mental health services for people with anxiety and depression. The pathway has been identified as a priority to support the integration of mental and physical health services for people with long-term conditions such as cancer.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to put in place additional measures to tackle cancer treatment waiting times.

Reducing cancer treatment waiting times is already a priority for this Government. The Department is working jointly with NHS England on implementing the delivery plan for tackling the COVID-19 backlogs in elective care. The Government plans to spend more than £8 billion from 2022/23 to 2024/25 to help drive up and protect elective activity, including cancer diagnosis and treatment activity.

In the 2023/24 Operational Planning Guidance, NHS England announced it is providing over £390 million in cancer service development funding to Cancer Alliances in each of the next two years to support delivery of the strategy and the operational priorities for cancer which includes increasing and prioritising diagnostic and treatment capacity for cancer.

Additionally, the Government recently published the Major Conditions Strategy Case for Change and Our Strategic Framework on 14 August which sets out our approach to making the choices over the next five years that will deliver the most value in facing the health challenges of today and of the decades ahead, including for cancer.

NHS England continues to actively support those trusts requiring the greatest help to cut cancer waiting lists and treatment and the Department is working with NHS England to make further improvements.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much and what proportion of NHS England funding is expected to go to integrated care boards in the 2023-24 financial year; how much and what proportion of NHS England funding went to integrated care boards in the 2022-23 financial year; and how much and what proportion of NHS England funding went to clinical commissioning groups in (a) 2019-20, (b) 2020-21 and (c) 2021-22 financial years.

The following table shows the total final allocation to integrated care boards (ICBs) and/or clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) for the financial years 2019/20 to 2022/23, plus the current annual allocation value as at month two for 2023/24. This includes all allocations to ICBs and/or CCGs, including core programme funding, services delegated to ICBs such as general practice and other primary care services, and additional allocations for specific service development and transformation programmes.

The remainder of NHS England’s allocation, not allocated to ICBs, pays mainly for other National Health Service services and costs not commissioned by ICBs. This includes specialised services, vaccinations and screening, education and training, and other centrally managed NHS costs.

Financial year

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

£ million

£ million

£ million

£ million

£ million

CCG and/or ICB allocation

89,730

101,907

115,007

119,174

123,880

Total NHS England allocation (Non-ring-fenced RDEL)

123,377

149,473

150,614

158,521

167,313

CCG/ICB allocation as % of total allocation

73%

68%

76%

75%

74%

27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps he has taken to help younger men with their mental health.

We are investing at least £2.3 billion of additional funding a year by March 2024 through the NHS Long Term Plan to expand and transform mental health services in England so that two million more people, including younger men, will be able to get the mental health support they need.

This investment includes an additional £57 million in suicide prevention by March 2024. Through this, all areas of the country are seeing investment to support local suicide prevention plans and the development of suicide bereavement services.

The Government launched a public call for evidence on what can be done across Government in the longer term to support mental health, wellbeing, and suicide prevention, which closed on 7 July 2022. We received submissions from 5,273 respondents representing a broad range of stakeholders, including those working with younger men, from across England. These responses will feed into the development of mental health and suicide prevention policies we include in the Major Conditions Strategy and the Suicide Prevention Strategy.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
22nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many integrated care boards include representatives of dentists.

The information requested is not held centrally.

16th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to reduce the time taken to diagnosis people with bipolar disorder.

The NHS Long Term Plan commits to investing approximately £1 billion by 2023/24 to increase access to high quality care in the community for people with severe mental illness, including bipolar disorder. Through the new models of care provided by integrated care systems, services will be based on the needs of individuals, rather than solely on diagnoses. This follows feedback received from those with severe mental illnesses, such as bipolar disorder, during the development of the community mental health framework.

Information on National Health Service expenditure on services and treatments specifically for people with bipolar disorder is not held in the format requested.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)