Simon Jupp Portrait

Simon Jupp

Conservative - East Devon

First elected: 12th December 2019


4 APPG memberships (as of 24 Jan 2024)
Channel Islands, Commercial Radio, Hospitality and Tourism, South West
3 Former APPG memberships
Mayflower 400, South Western Railway, Water Safety
Pensions (Extension of Automatic Enrolment) (No. 2) Bill
8th Mar 2023 - 15th Mar 2023
Transport Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 25th Oct 2022
Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill
12th Oct 2022 - 20th Oct 2022
National Security Bill
29th Jun 2022 - 18th Oct 2022
Charities Bill [HL]
19th Jan 2022 - 25th Jan 2022


Scheduled Event
Tuesday 5th March 2024
16:30
Westminster Hall debate - Westminster Hall
5 Mar 2024, 4:30 p.m.
Performance of South West Water
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Department Event
Thursday 18th April 2024
09:30
Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport
Oral questions - Main Chamber
18 Apr 2024, 9:30 a.m.
Culture, Media and Sport (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 293 Conservative No votes vs 2 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 179 Noes - 294
Speeches
Tuesday 27th February 2024
BBC News Impartiality: Government's Role
My right hon. and learned Friend is making a great speech detailing some of the failures of BBC editorial policy. …
Written Answers
Tuesday 20th February 2024
Small Businesses: East Devon
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has made an estimate of the number and …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 16th October 2023
4. Visits outside the UK
Name of donor: Jersey's States Assembly
Address of donor: States Greffe, Morier House, Halkett Place, St. Helier, Jersey JE1 1DD …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 19th April 2023
Dartmoor National Park (Access) Bill 2022-23
A Bill to require the Secretary of State to publish proposals for a scheme to incentivise owners of land within …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Simon Jupp has voted in 902 divisions, and 5 times against the majority of their Party.

17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Simon Jupp voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
13 May 2020 - Remote Division result: New Clause 2 - View Vote Context
Simon Jupp voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative Aye votes vs 326 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 277 Noes - 328
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Simon Jupp voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
16 Jan 2023 - Strikes (Minimum Service Levels) Bill - View Vote Context
Simon Jupp voted No - against a party majority - in line with the party majority and in line with the House
One of 299 Conservative No votes vs 18 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 49 Noes - 482
6 Jun 2023 - Committee on Standards - View Vote Context
Simon Jupp voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 28 Conservative Aye votes vs 32 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 185 Noes - 40
View All Simon Jupp Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Michael Gove (Conservative)
Minister for Intergovernmental Relations
(11 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(9 debate interactions)
Robert Jenrick (Conservative)
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
View all Simon Jupp's debates

East Devon Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest East Devon signature proportion
Petitions with most East Devon signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

We want the Government to amend the Grocery Supply Code of Practice (GSCP) to require retailers, without exception, to:

- Buy what they agreed to buy
- Pay what they agreed to pay
- Pay on time

We believe the current GSCP is inadequate and doesn't protect farmers from unfair behaviour.

Isolation essential to the Government’s strategy for fighting coronavirus, and UK citizens must remain healthy and exercise whilst keeping adequate distance between people. The Government should allow golf courses to open so families or individuals can play golf in order to exercise safely.

In the event of a spike we would like you not to close gyms as a measure to stop any spread of Covid. Also for gyms to not be put in the same group as pubs in terms of risk or importance. Gyms are following strict guidelines and most members are following rules in a sober manner.


Latest EDMs signed by Simon Jupp

Simon Jupp has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Simon Jupp, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Simon Jupp has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Simon Jupp

Wednesday 17th January 2024

Simon Jupp has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


115 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3 Other Department Questions
13th Jul 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, with reference to the documents on Financial Assistance to Opposition Parties on the Parliamentary website, when the Commission plans to publish breakdown information on financial assistance given in 2022-23; and if the Commission will place a copy of that information in the Library of the House.

Details of expenditure relating to Financial Assistance to Opposition Parties received for financial year 2022–2023 is published in the House of Commons Members 2022–2023 Annual Report and Accounts (HC1685) which will be available on the Parliamentary website before the House rises for the summer recess.

The National Audit office (NAO) complete an audit of the House of Commons; Members, this includes a breakdown of Financial Assistance to Opposition Parties.

Once certified and agreed by the NAO the House of Commons Members Annual Report and Accounts can be laid, and then made available on the Parliamentary website.

The budgeted allocations and breakdown for 2022–23 is available on the Parliamentary site:
https://www.parliament.uk/site-information/freedom-of-information/information-we-already-publish/house-of-commons-publication-scheme/members-and-members-staff/financial-assistance-to-opposition-parties/

House of Commons Members Accounts, Parliamentary site:
https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/commons/resource-accounts/

17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what financial support is available to bowls clubs in England.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key Government priority and we recognise the positive impact participating in sport can have on health and wellbeing, as well as the benefits that sport clubs have on local communities.

Since 2019, Sport England has invested more than £8.6 million into bowls, including over £19,000 in the East Devon constituency.

Bowls clubs looking for funding up to £15,000 can apply for the Sport England small grants programme. Further information on this can be found at - https://www.sportengland.org/funds-and-campaigns/our-funds/small-grants-programme

We appreciate that some bowls clubs may be struggling with rising energy costs. That is why we announced the £18 billion Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) in September last year. The EBRS was always time-limited, and has now been replaced with the Energy Bills Discount Scheme (EBDS). Under the EBDS, bowls clubs will continue to receive discounts on their gas and electricity bills during the 12-month period from April 2023 to March 2024.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether her Department plans to give guidance to providers of adult talking conversion therapies in religious contexts in order to accurately communicate the harm and risks associated with conversion therapy.

The Government’s consultation on our proposals to ban conversion therapy closed on 4 February. Analysis of the responses will be used to further refine our proposals and inform the process of developing legislation for Spring, to be introduced when Parliamentary time allows. Once legislation is passed, Government will work with the relevant parties in the usual way to ensure it is clear how to comply with the law.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what progress he has made on negotiating the continuation of EU banking passporting rules to ensure that UK expatriates do not have their bank accounts closed at the end of the transition period.

The majority of expatriates living in the EU should not see any change to their banking at the end of the transition period. The Government expects banks to treat customers fairly and provide timely communications to enable them to make appropriate decisions. The Financial Conduct Authority continues to engage with firms to ensure they are meeting these expectations.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what plans he has to enable outdoor, social distance compliant (a) wedding ceremonies and (b) receptions to take place in summer 2020.

Our Plan To Rebuild, the Government's COVID-19 Recovery Strategy, is published on gov.uk and includes details on plans for weddings. We understand the frustration couples planning a wedding must be feeling at this time. We are keeping these restrictions under review and will ease them as soon as it is safe to do so. We will continue to work closely with faith leaders and local government over the coming weeks to go through the practicalities of doing so.

Marriages and civil partnerships under the special procedure for those who are seriously ill and not expected to recover, are taking place in some cases where it is safe to do so in line with PHE guidance.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has made an estimate of the number and proportion of SMEs that have received funding from her Department in East Devon constituency in each of the last three years.

The Department has a wide range of programmes and is pleased that the first of the new Regions and Nations Funds includes East Devon constituency. The new South West Investment Fund launched in July 2023 and has already invested £32,000 into Exeter Eyewear based at Exeter Science Park.

Through its business as usual programmes and Covid support schemes, the British Business Bank facilitated funding to the following number of businesses in East Devon in the last three years:

  • 2023: 15 (up to September 2023)
  • 2022: 40
  • 2021: 254
Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how much funding was provided to businesses through Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans in (a) 2020-21 and (b) 2021-22, broken down by industry sector.

As of 31 December 2022, the outstanding balance for Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans that have yet to be repaid was £13.29 billion. A sector breakdown of this information is not available. 25.13% of facilities have been fully repaid, at a value of £7.15 billion.

The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme delivered 109,877 loans worth £26.39 billion and closed on 31 March 2021. A breakdown of facilities by sector for Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans, to 2 July 2021, can be found on the British Business Bank website: https://www.british-business-bank.co.uk/press-release/analysis-of-final-coronavirus-loan-scheme-data-shows-79-3bn-of-loans-to-1-67m-businesses-evenly-distributed-across-whole-of-the-uk/

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what is the monetary value of Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans that have yet to be repaid, broken down by industry sector.

As of 31 December 2022, the outstanding balance for Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans that have yet to be repaid was £13.29 billion. A sector breakdown of this information is not available. 25.13% of facilities have been fully repaid, at a value of £7.15 billion.

The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme delivered 109,877 loans worth £26.39 billion and closed on 31 March 2021. A breakdown of facilities by sector for Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans, to 2 July 2021, can be found on the British Business Bank website: https://www.british-business-bank.co.uk/press-release/analysis-of-final-coronavirus-loan-scheme-data-shows-79-3bn-of-loans-to-1-67m-businesses-evenly-distributed-across-whole-of-the-uk/

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what her timeline is for the introduction of regulation of heat networks.

The Energy Bill provides powers for the Government to introduce a Heat Network Market Framework.

Subject to the passage of the Bill, the Government intends to introduce regulations implementing these powers across 2024, with initial measures coming into effect in 2025. The Market Framework will be fully operational by 2026.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
23rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential impact of a zero-carbon electricity by 2030 target on (c) consumer bills, (b) energy security and (c) temporary interruptions in electricity supply.

It is the Government's ambition to achieve fully decarbonised electricity by 2035, subject to security of supply. The Government is focused on delivering the policies and programmes which support this goal, while maintaining a secure, reliable and low cost energy system.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
29th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what recent progress her Department has made on the Project Gigabit procurement process for work in East Devon constituency.

Over 95% of premises in East Devon already have access to a superfast broadband connection (over 30Mbps) and over 71% have access to gigabit-capable broadband (>1000 Mbps). This is slightly below the national average of 97% for superfast coverage and 79% for gigabit coverage respectively.

As part of Project Gigabit, in September 2023 we launched a procurement to invite suppliers to bid for a contract to bring gigabit-capable broadband to the remaining premises in Mid and East Devon and West Somerset that are unlikely to be reached by broadband suppliers' commercial rollout plans. We aim to award a contract to the successful supplier in summer 2024.

24th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government plans to introduce legislative proposals regulating the heat networks sector.

The Queen’s Speech on 10th May confirmed that the Government has now committed to legislating to regulate the heat networks market in this parliamentary session as part of the Energy Security Bill. In December 2021, the Government announced that Ofgem will take on the role of heat networks regulator.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what regulations currently apply to district heating schemes to protect consumers; and whether he is considering introducing further regulations of that nature.

Until now, there have been no sector specific protections for heat network consumers, unlike for people on other utilities such as gas, electricity or water. However, heat networks consumers have had some protection through The Heat Network Metering and Billing Regulations 2014 (HNMBR). HNMBR 2014 (as amended in 2015 and 2020) contain requirements related to the notification of heat networks and to the metering of heat and cooling as well as billing for customers on heat networks.  Heat meters support fair and transparent billing based on actual consumption and can drive energy efficiency savings and cost reductions.

We recognise the need to ensure heat network consumers receive a fair price for their heating. That is why we are committed to legislating within this parliament to regulate the heat networks sector and in December we announced that Ofgem will take on the role of regulator. We will therefore give Ofgem new powers to regulate prices in this sector as a matter of priority. This will enable equivalent protection for domestic heat network customers as well as ensuring heat network operators are securing good purchasing deals for their consumers. This will mean that consumers are charged a fair rate for heating whilst encouraging investment in heat networks.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to remove unsafe or non-compliant motorcycle rider protective equipment from sale.

Frontline enforcement of personal protective equipment (PPE) for consumer use, including the removal from sale of unsafe or non-compliant motorcycle rider protective equipment, is conducted by local trading standards authorities supported by the Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS), and by the Health and Safety Executive where it is used in the workplace. OPSS has been working with the PPE trade association and its Primary Authority where specific allegations of non-compliance have been made.

4th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much taxpayers’ money each trade union has (a) registered with the Certification Officer and (b) claimed under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, according to information held by HM Revenue and Customs.

Trade unions do not register taxpayer’s money with the Certification Officer. Section 32 of the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992 requires trade unions to provide an annual return to the Certification Officer detailing their income and expenditure for a given period. Trade unions are not required to include specific details of payments received from Government departments, agencies or arms-length bodies in this annual return.

The Government is not able to publish information about employers who have used the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) and who are also trade unions. This is in relation to HMRC’s duty of confidentiality. HMRC cannot publish identifying information that relates to one of its functions. The CJRS is one of HMRC’s functions and publishing a list of organisations would provide identifying information.

13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what financial support is available to cricket clubs in England.

We provide the majority of support for grassroots sport including cricket through our Arms Length Body, Sport England - which receives over £100 million in Exchequer funding each year.

As a system partner of Sport England the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) has received £11.6 million of funding covering the years 2022-2027 to grow and develop cricket across the country.

Since 2019, Sport England has invested a further £23.6 million in projects and schemes which enable participation in cricket. This includes £9,564 of support that has been provided to clubs in the East Devon constituency in response to issues such as Covid-19 and emergency funding for storm-damaged facilities.

Further information on funding options available from both the ECB and Sport England can be found on the ECB’s website- Here

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans the Government has to review the success of the Tourism Recovery Plan against the objectives it set out.

The Tourism Recovery Plan sets out the government’s commitment to provide the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee with an annual update on the progress of the plan and the tourism industry more generally as it recovers, with the first update in 2022.

We plan to provide the first update in the coming months.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if her Department will make an estimate of the potential impact on (a) the apprenticeship budget and (b) apprenticeship starts of permitting levy-payers to spend (i) 25% and (ii) 50% of their apprenticeship levy accounts on non-apprenticeship training.

In the last two financial years, an average 98% of the English apprenticeships budget was spent. The apprenticeships budget in England is ring-fenced for apprenticeships only and is used to fund training and assessment for all employers, both those who pay the levy and those who do not. It is therefore important that the apprenticeships budget remains ring-fenced for apprenticeships to ensure continued affordability of the programme and to ensure that employers of all sizes, including small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) that do not pay the levy, can continue to access high-quality apprenticeships training.

If employers were able to use 25% of their levy funds for non-apprenticeships training, the department estimates that this would create an additional cost of up to approximately £700 million per annum. Allowing employers to use up to 50% of their funds for non-apprenticeship training would increase this cost to up to £1.5 billion per annum. Without making additional funding available to support this flexible use of levy funds, the department estimates that this would require a significant reduction in new apprenticeship starts to approximately 140,000 per annum. This is around a 60% decrease on the 350,000 apprenticeship starts reported for the 2021/22 academic year.

The apprenticeship levy was introduced to increase employer investment in high-quality apprenticeships training, and with the intention that large employers’ levy contributions would fund access to apprenticeships for all employers. The Government wants to support SMEs across England to offer more apprenticeship opportunities and so in April we removed the restriction on the number of apprentices SMEs can recruit. The department continues to pay for 95% of the apprentice training costs for SMEs, rising to 100% for the smallest employers recruiting apprentices under the age of 19.

Employers can already choose to spend their levy funds on any of the 680 plus apprenticeship standards available, or to transfer 25% of their funds to support apprenticeships in other businesses. They can also benefit from a range of other government-funded skills programmes, including skills bootcamps, higher technical qualifications and T Level industry placements.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to announce the schools selected from the third round of the School Rebuilding Programme.

On 12 July 2022, the department announced the next round of 61 schools to be included in the school rebuilding programme. A list of these schools is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-rebuilding-programme-2022-to-2023-approved-schools/school-rebuilding-programme-2022-to-2023-prioritised-schools.

The department is assessing all other nominations and we intend to make another announcement later this year to confirm additional schools, selecting up to 300 in total in the 2022/23 financial year.

18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the future provision of funding for Music Education Hubs.

Music Education Hubs have a vital role to play not only in core school music but also ensuring our children have access to all the benefits of a wider musical education through instrumental lessons and ensembles. They have acted swiftly and innovatively to support schools through the COVID-19 outbreak, including the continuation of continuing professional development to classroom teachers.

Following the one year Spending Review settlement announced by my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer on 15 December 2020, the Department will continue to fund Music Education Hubs for the financial year 2021-22. Funding has been confirmed with Arts Council England and all Music Education Hubs organisations have recently been updated on this matter. An announcement on the national funding will be made shortly, followed by further details on specific funding allocations issued to individual hubs.

5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the Year 2 phonics screening test will be taken during the autumn term.

In the 2020/21 academic year, it is a statutory requirement for schools to administer a past version of the phonics screening check for Year 2 pupils during the second half of the 2020 autumn term.

The autumn assessment will ensure that pupils who need extra support to decode phonics are identified. Those who meet the expected phonics standard will not be required to repeat the assessment. Those who do not meet the expected standard will be expected to retake the statutory check in June 2021, alongside current Year 1 pupils.


5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to amend the assessment criteria for SATs due to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department acknowledges current concerns raised in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak. It recognises that pupils have missed a critical period of their education due to school closures in the 2019/20 academic year and further disruption in the 2020/21 academic year. As a consequence, the Department is planning that primary assessments will take place in the 2020/21 academic year as a test of the national curriculum, with the standard unchanged. This will not only allow better targeted support to those who need it most but will also ensure that schools have the information they need to help inform ongoing teaching for the pupils affected by school closures.

8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to eradicate Japanese knotweed.

The Government recognises the threats posed by invasive species, including Japanese knotweed, and has a comprehensive Great Britain Non-native Species Strategy designed to co-ordinate action to tackle these threats.  Defra funds biocontrol research to tackle Japanese knotweed. It is hoped that this will provide a cost and time effective way of managing this species. This research has identified the psyllid Aphalari itadori, (a sap-sucking insect), as a biological control agent for tackling Japanese Knotweed. Information about the research can be found on the Japanese Knotweed Alliance website.

Local Action Groups, with support from Government, are actively involved in reducing and eradicating Japanese knotweed.

Japanese knotweed is listed on Schedule 9 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, which makes it an offence to allow the plant to escape or cause it to grow in the wild. The Government has developed guidance on how to prevent the spread of Japanese knotweed and other harmful weeds, as well as how to treat and dispose of them, which can be found on GOV.UK:

How to stop invasive non-native plants from spreading - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

The Government also run awareness raising campaigns such as ‘Be Plant Wise’ and Invasive Species Week, as well as providing species information and online training materials on biosecurity on the GB NNSS website.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to help reduce sewage discharges in East Devon constituency.

The Government is clear that the amount of sewage discharged into our waters is unacceptable. That is why our Plan for Water sets out more investment, stronger regulation, and tougher enforcement to tackle widespread sources of pollution.

We have legislated to introduce unlimited penalties on water companies which breach their environmental permits and expand the range of offences to which penalties can be applied, giving the Environment Agency the tools it needs to hold water companies including South West Water (SWW) accountable.

The Environment Agency has worked with water companies to complete a programme to install Event Duration Monitoring to provide robust and consistent monitoring of how often and for how long all Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs) are used. This was completed for all CSOs in Devon and Cornwall in 2023.

The Water Industry National Environment Programme (WINEP) is an important mechanism for delivering benefits to the natural environment. The Environment Agency works closely with SWW to review investigations and influence improvements to water company assets and activities which impact the environment, including but not limited to bathing waters, drinking water protected areas and sites of special scientific interest.

The Environment Agency is currently investigating two recent incidents in Exmouth and has required SWW to provide data and information to support its investigations. The Environment Agency is seeking assurance that SWW is doing all it can to mitigate the environmental impacts, while the Environment Agency waits for future overdue improvements through WINEP. The prioritisation of improvements remains a substantial agenda item at regular performance meetings with the company.

Robbie Moore
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what information her Department holds on the number of trees planted in East Devon constituency since 2010.

The reporting statistic the hon. Member has requested is not currently available. However, officials from the Forestry Commission have begun the process of analysing the data required to answer this question. I invite the hon. Member to write to the Forestry Commission where officials can provide the results of this analysis.

8th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that the reporting of storm overflows in real time will be (a) consistent, (b) transparent, (c) accessible and (d) readily understood by the public.

The Environment Act places new monitoring duties on the water industry to significantly improve transparency. It requires companies to make discharge data available in near real time to the public and to monitor water quality upstream and downstream of their assets.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the report by Ofwat entitled Water Company Performance Report 2021-22, published in December 2022, whether her Department plans to take steps to ensure that underspend is invested by water companies into reducing sewage discharges.

Ofwat’s findings that water companies are not spending investment assigned to make service improvements is completely unacceptable. Overall, water companies have only spent 61% of their forecasted wastewater enhancement cost allowance during 2020-22, which has resulted in delaying crucial wastewater infrastructure to improve water resilience and the environment.

Yorkshire Water and South West Water have only spent 20% and 39% of their allowance, respectively. The SoS and I met with the CEOs of these two companies in December to discuss their performance.

I am aware that the COVID pandemic and the conflict in Ukraine have impacted on supply chains, but other water companies are exceeding their spend and I expect all water companies to urgently get their spending back on track and implement the upgrades to water and wastewater infrastructure they have been funded to deliver and that customers rightly expect. I will continue to meet with the CEOs of underperforming companies to monitor their progress.

Ofwat, as the economic regulator for the water industry, has been clear that where these expectations are not met and companies are failing to comply with their obligations, they will take action, including enforcement action where warranted.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent estimate her Department has made of the number of sustainable urban drainage schemes that are (a) in full operation and (b) under construction in England.

The number of sustainable urban drainage schemes that are in full operation or under construction in England is not held by my department.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to help small abattoirs remain financially viable.

Defra recognises the important role small abattoirs play in supporting the rural economy and is very much committed to engaging with the small abattoir sector to maintain a robust and competitive sector. To this end, Defra has convened the Small Abattoirs Working Group, which brings together representatives of Defra, the small abattoir sector and the various Government agencies that oversee the industry. This group provides a platform to discuss the challenges and opportunities faced by small abattoirs including those that impact on financial viability. Through this we have identified three key priority work areas: the regulatory framework, funding and adding value to animal by-products. We are working closely with industry through a series of focused sub-groups to facilitate workable solutions to issues in these areas, where possible.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to tackle labour shortages in the pig processing industry.

The Government has announced a package of measures to support the pig industry. These measures come in recognition of the unique temporary circumstances farmers are facing, brought about by the global economy responding to the impacts of the pandemic, the loss of the Chinese export market for some processors and the global pressures facing supply chains worldwide.

From November 2021, these measures include allowing up to 800 temporary pig butchers to enter the UK to work for six months. This temporary adjustment is in addition to foreign butchers already being eligible to apply to come to the UK through the Skilled Worker Route as part of the point-based immigration system.

The temporary visas are not a long-term solution and businesses must make long term investments in the UK domestic workforce to build a high-wage, high-skill economy, instead of relying on overseas labour. The Government expects the pork sector to encourage better training offers, career options and wage increases to ensure that the sector draws on the large domestic labour pool in the UK, as well as investing in technology across the industry.

To support these efforts, Defra is working with industry and the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to raise awareness of career opportunities within the food and farming sectors among UK workers. All pig farming and processing businesses are encouraged to advertise roles through DWP's Find A Job website, where they can upload and manage their vacancies. The DWP does not charge for this service and it is available across the United Kingdom.

In 2021 and beyond, the pig industry will continue to be able to rely on EU nationals living in the UK with settled or pre-settled status. Over 5.3 million EU citizens and their families have been granted status under the EU Settlement Scheme and EU nationals who have settled status can continue to travel to the UK to do seasonal work in the pig processing sector in 2021.

Defra is also working closely with the Home Office to ensure there is a long-term strategy for the food and farming workforce beyond 2021.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to tackle labour shortages in the poultry sector.

We are aware of the challenges that the poultry industry has encountered in recent months. Defra continues to monitor the market, and we will continue to work closely with the sector.

Defra is working with the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to raise awareness of career opportunities within the food and farming sectors among UK workers.

DWP is supporting Defra to develop and deliver a long-term recruitment strategy that supports the domestic workforce into both seasonal and long-term roles in the agriculture sector, including the poultry sector.

DWP has worked with Defra and key Trade Associations to develop a regional recruitment strategy that utilises DWP's Jobcentre Plus network, fosters strong local links between employers and work coaches, and gives jobseekers the skills and knowledge they need to enter the sector.

All poultry businesses are encouraged to advertise roles through DWP's Find A Job website, where they can upload and manage their vacancies. DWP does not charge for this service and it is available nationally, including Scotland and Wales.

Defra welcomes the Ministry of Justice's work on the Release On Temporary Licence (ROTL) scheme for work across a number of sectors, including the agri-food sector. The scheme aims to help prisoners gain useful skills and work experience as they approach their release.

In 2021 and beyond, food and farming businesses continue to be able to rely on EU nationals living in the UK with settled or pre-settled status. Over 5.1 million EU citizens and their families have been granted status under the EU Settlement Scheme and EU nationals who have settled status can continue to travel to the UK to do work in the poultry sector in 2021.

Defra is also working closely with the Home Office to ensure there is a long-term strategy for the food and farming workforce beyond 2021.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if his Department will take steps to preserve bass stocks by (a) tackling illegal targeting by commercial boats and (b) limiting the use of inshore netting.

Steps have already been taken to preserve bass stocks.

We have ensured the current bass management approach to address commercial fishing pressure has been achieved by applying landing limits under specific fishing gear type derogations for both UK and EU vessels. These limits are closely monitored and actively enforced by the Marine Management Organisation.

Ensuring the current annual unavoidable by-catch limit for fixed gillnetters at 1.4 tonnes is adhered to is a key enforcement priority. This approach has reduced UK bass landings from inshore netting by up to 70% in recent years.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Environment Agency is taking to prevent illegal angling in Devon.

The Environment Agency (EA) is the regulating authority for freshwater angling in England. The EA reports statistics across the operational area of Devon and Cornwall so is unable to specify figures for Devon only.

A rod licence is required to go freshwater fishing and the income from licence sales goes back into enhancing fishing, with a proportion dedicated to enforcement. This year up to 31 July the EA sold 16,661 rod licences in the Devon and Cornwall operational area generating £434,222 of revenue.

Unfortunately, in Devon and across the country not everyone who goes fishing has a licence. The EA estimates one offence for every 25 anglers checked nationally and in Devon and Cornwall annual evasion rates are estimated at 4%.

Covering Devon and Cornwall, the EA has four Fisheries Enforcement Officers in post, with another in recruitment, who are responsible for checking anglers have the correct licence. In the 2019-20 financial year, 702 licences were checked across Devon and Cornwall - of these 24 people were prosecuted, two were cautioned and one formally warned for offences of not having a licence or not complying with the conditions of their licence. The number of prosecutions in Devon and Cornwall has remained at a similar level since 2016.

Rod licence checks were temporarily suspended during the coronavirus lockdown period in line with Government advice to help protect EA staff and others. The EA maintained links with partners during this time and has now recommenced rod licence checking and other field-based operations, in line with latest Government guidance and safe ways of working.

To deter illegal angling, the EA works with the police and engages with the public to provide advice and guidance and gather intelligence. It also works with local clubs and the Angling Trust to raise awareness and support local projects to improve habitats for fish and promote angling.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what plans her Department has to announce a replacement scheme for the Tradeshow Access Programme.

The Department for International Trade will announce further details on plans for a revised trade show support programme when discussions with HM Treasury are concluded.

The £38m Internationalisation Fund, launched last year, provides matching grants for export support including attendance at trade shows.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
21st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to help strengthen public confidence in international travel during 2022.

Following the changes to international travel implemented on 11 February, including the removal of all testing requirements for eligible vaccinated passengers, reducing measures for all other passengers, and recognising vaccine certificates from over 180 countries and territories, the UK now has one of the most open and streamlined COVID-19 border regimes in the world. Furthermore, my Rt Hon Friend the Transport Secretary is also looking at removing the Passenger Locator Form as soon as possible.

The Government has also committed to developing a contingency toolkit, to be set out ahead of Easter, with new border health measures only implemented in extreme circumstances where necessary to protect public health against COVID-19 variants.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to announce the successful local authority bids in the third tranche of the Active Travel Fund.

The Department intends to make an announcement on this matter very shortly.

12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with representatives of the motorcycle industry on encouraging the use of protective equipment to reduce the severity of collision related injury.

As set out in The Motor Cycles (Protective Helmets) Regulations 1998, every person driving or riding a motorcycle on the road must wear a helmet. The Department’s safety helmet assessment and rating programme (SHARP) aims to change riders’ attitudes and habits to helmet safety and in so doing contribute to a reduction in the number of motorcyclists killed and seriously injured on UK roads.

The Secretary of State has not had any recent discussions with representatives of the motorcycle industry but the Department routinely engages with them in the development of its policies. There are currently no plans to mandate the wearing of protective clothing for motorcyclists as the Government believes that the use of protective clothing should remain a matter for individual choice, rather than become a legislative requirement.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to financially support coach operators in converting their fleets from Euro V to Euro VI emission standards.

We are committed to ensuring transport plays its part in reaching our net zero targets, and as such we are considering how to support all modes of transport. This includes working with the coach industry to support the increase of zero emission vehicles in their fleets.

7th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether financial allowances received by elected local councillors count towards the Universal Credit work allowance.

Allowances paid by Local Authorities to councillors for their official duties are earnings and are treated as such in the calculation of any Universal Credit award. All earnings, above any applicable work allowance, are subject to the 55% taper and the Universal Credit award is calculated on that basis.

The Universal Credit work allowance is an amount of earnings eligible households can earn before the single taper rate is applied to their earnings and their Universal Credit begins to be reduced. Those councillors with responsibility for a child or qualifying young person, and/or limited capability for work will be eligible for a work allowance.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that employment support is accessible in communities throughout the UK.

We want everyone to be able to find a job, progress in work and thrive in the Labour Market, wherever they live.

We are moving at pace to introduce new Jobcentres across the UK, with leases already secured on 111 additional temporary sites. To date, we have recruited over 14,600 additional Work Coaches.

Throughout the pandemic, Jobcentres remained open for anyone who needed face-to-face support. As of last month, all jobcentres in England, Scotland and Wales returned to their pre-lockdown opening hours.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Child Maintenance Service cases have been (a) received and (b) overturned by the Independent Case Examiner in each of the last five years.

Details of the number of Child Maintenance Service complaints received and accepted for examination by the Independent Case Examiner’s Office in each of the last five full reporting years is detailed in table (a). Table (b) provides details of the number of Child Support Maintenance cases cleared by the Independent Case Examiner’s Office during the same period and the type of clearance. The Independent Case Examiner’s Office can only accept a complaint for examination once the complainant has exhausted the DWP complaints process.

Official figures show that nearly eight out of ten CMS customers stated that they are happy with the service they receive. In cases where the CMS directly manage payments 70% of money due to be paid in the quarter ending March 2020 was collected, amounting to more than £45 million.

We are clear that it is never acceptable for parents to evade their responsibilities to their children and the CMS will continue to clamp down on people who think they can abuse or dodge the system.

Table (a): Child Maintenance Service complaints received and accepted in each of the last five full report year.

Reporting Year

Complaints Received

Complaints Accepted for Examination*

2015/16

135

85

2016/17

381

118

2017/18

392

83

2018/19

741

198

2019/20

890

196

Table (b): Number of Child Support Maintenance cases clear by the Independent Case Examiner’s Office during the last five full reporting years and the type of clearance / outcome.

Reporting Year

Withdrawn

Resolved / Settled to complainants satisfaction

ICE Report – Fully or Partially Upheld

ICE Report – Not Upheld

Total Cleared

2015/16

2

13

33

6

54

2016/17

5

22

34

9

70

2017/18

2

12

56

7

77

2018/19

5

46

41

8

100

2019/20

2

48

55

18

123

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Child Maintenance Service cases have been (a) received and (b) overturned by the HM Courts and Tribunal Service, in each of the last five years.

The Child Maintenance Service is unable to provide figures relating to how many cases HMCTS have received. However, Table 15 of experimental data refers to cases which have been actioned by HMCTS for each quarter and were upheld. Upheld is defined as where Her Majesty's Courts & Tribunals Service overturns the decision made by the Child Maintenance Service and supports the parent's appeal. This includes appeals where the appellant provides additional evidence to the court not previously made available to the Child Maintenance Service.

Quarter Ending

Upheld

Jun-15

15

Sep-15

30

Dec-15

40

Total

85

Mar-16

30

Jun-16

35

Sep-16

45

Dec-16

60

Total

170

Mar-17

80

Jun-17

70

Sep-17

90

Dec-17

105

Total

245

Mar-18

140

Jun-18

165

Sep-18

160

Dec-18

180

Total

645

Mar-19

145

Jun-19

235

Sep-19

225

Dec-19

225

Total

930

Mar-20

225

2075

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps she is taking to help improve access to NHS menopause services.

The menopause is a priority area within the Women’s Health Strategy. The NHS England National Menopause Care Improvement Programme is working to improve clinical menopause care in England and reduce disparities in access to treatment. NHS England is working with integrated care systems in the Midlands, piloting new guidance to support teams in primary care better to recognise and treat menopause symptoms.

We are investing £25 million in women’s health hubs, so that women can get better access to care for essential services such as menstrual problems, contraception and the menopause.

We have also reduced the cost of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) prescriptions through a bespoke HRT Prescription Prepayment Certificate. More than 500,000 HRT Prescription Prepayment Certificates have now been purchased since the launch on 1 April 2023, meaning women who pay for prescriptions, pay less than £20 for all of their HRT prescriptions for a year. The average saving is estimated to be around £30 a year with total savings of approximately £13 million.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment her Department has made of the adequacy of NHS menopause services available in Devon.

No specific assessment has been made. The menopause is a priority area within the Women’s Health Strategy. The NHS England National Menopause Care Improvement Programme is working to improve clinical menopause care in England, and to reduce disparities in access to treatment. This programme has already delivered training packages for healthcare professionals, and a self-care fact sheet for women. NHS England is also working with integrated care systems in the Midlands, piloting new guidance to support teams in primary care to better recognise and treat menopause symptoms. We are investing £25 million in women’s health hubs nationally, so that women can get better access to care for essential services such as menstrual problems, contraception and the menopause.

The two priority areas for the pilot women’s health hubs in Devon are services for a menopause pathway and improving access to long-acting reversible contraception, including for non-contraceptive reasons such as the menopause.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of the costs of social care are funded by the adult social care precept charged by local authorities.

The total value of the precept each year includes all the annual increases set by councils since 2016/17, and the Government does not publish this total. We cannot therefore calculate the proportion of adult social care spend each year funded from the precept. However, the Government publishes the amount raised by the increase in the adult social care precept each year. In 2023/24, councils could increase the precept by up to 2%, raising an estimated maximum of £561 million.

The evidence review for Adult Social Care Reform, published in December 2021, estimated that up to 70% of total adult social care spend is from public sources.

The impact of the social care precept varies across the country, depending upon the decisions that local authorities make about how much precept to levy and how much it needs to spend on adult social care.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will make an estimate of the cost to the public purse of establishing a college of clinical leadership to train NHS managers in leadership skills.

There has been no such estimate made. The NHS Leadership Academy, which is part of NHS England, provides a wide range of tools, programmes and expertise to help National Health Service organisations develop their leaders and embed best practice.

The Messenger review, Leadership for a collaborative and inclusive future, was published in June 2022. It focussed on ways to strengthen leadership and management across health and adult social care. The review set out seven recommendations which were accepted by the government. The recommendations are aimed at fostering and replicating the best examples of leadership through improved training, career development and talent management.

NHS England is leading on implementation of all seven recommendations and is working in partnership with Skills for Care where they apply to the social care workforce.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Dec 2023
NHS
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will make an estimate of the cost to the public purse of establishing an independent statutory committee to assess the NHS.

The cost of any such committee would depend on the task it was set through its terms of reference.

NHS England has existing responsibilities to maintain and improve health care services in a way that is financially and operationally sustainable within the resource limits set by the government, and to oversee and support integrated care boards (ICBs), National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts, including by conducting annual assessments of ICBs. NHS England regularly publishes information on NHS performance.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will make an estimate of the (a) revenue and (b) capital costs of (i) guaranteeing mental health treatment within a month, (ii) establishing walk-in mental health hubs for children and young people and (iii) providing specialist mental health support in all schools over the next five years.

As part of its clinically led review of NHS Access Standards, the National Health Service is working towards implementing five new waiting time standards, one of which is that children, young people, and their families/carers presenting to community-based mental health services, should start to receive care within four weeks from referral. NHS England has recently published new data on mental health waiting times this year, to increase transparency and improve the quality of the data collected. Improvements are needed in the quality of data to make an accurate assessment of the cost implications of introducing the standards.

There are currently approximately 65 locally funded early support hubs in England, which are open to those aged between 11 and 25 years old who may not meet the threshold to receive NHS support. These are commissioned locally by integrated care boards and local authorities, working with local partners to understand local needs. In addition, on 25 October 2023, we announced £4.92 million of new funding to deliver and evaluate innovative community-based mental health and wellbeing support for young people at 10 sites across England until the end of 2024/25. Bids are currently being considered and the ten successful hubs will be announced in due course.

NHS England continues to roll out mental health support teams to schools and colleges across England. There are now approximately 400 mental health support teams in place, covering over three million children or around 35% of pupils in schools and colleges. We estimate this will increase to 44% by April 2024 and we are working to increase this coverage to 50% of pupils by March 2025.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
12th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will make it her policy to double (a) MRI and (b) CT scanning capacity; and if she will make an estimate of the (i) revenue and (ii) capital cost of doing so over each of the next five years.

£2.3 billion was awarded at SR21 to transform diagnostic services over three years. Most of this will help deliver our ambition to increase the number of Community Diagnostic Centres up to 160 by March 2025, expanding and protecting elective planned diagnostic services. Funding will also provide additional diagnostic equipment to increase imaging capacity in acute settings, as well as increasing capacity for endoscopy and mammography screening, and improving digital diagnostics.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will make an estimate of the cost to the public purse of ensuring that patients are always able to see the same GP for each visit.

The Government recognises the importance of the relationship between patients and their general practitioner (GP). However, in some cases patients may prefer to see another professional from the wider general practice workforce instead of a specific GP.

While the Government has not made an estimate of the cost of ensuring that patients are able to see the same GP for each visit, all patients must be assigned a named GP. Practices must endeavour to comply with all reasonable requests for a patient to see a particular GP or other healthcare professional for an appointment.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will make an estimate of the cost to the public purse of setting national pay and conditions terms for social care workers.

The Department has no current plans to make an estimate of the cost to the public purse of setting national pay and conditions terms for social care workers. Most care workers are employed by private sector providers who set their pay and terms and conditions, independent of central government.

In the ‘Next steps to put People at the Heart of Care’ we announced our intention to launch a new Care Workforce Pathway for Adult Social Care, which will support development and provide a career structure to the workforce.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an estimate of the cost of doubling (a) Magnetic resonance imaging and (b) computerised tomography scanning capacity in the NHS over a five year period.

No estimate has been made.

As part of the Government’s commitment to increase diagnostics services, £2.3 billion of funding has been awarded to transform diagnostic services over the next three years which will help to increase the number of community diagnostic centres up to 160 by March 2025, expanding and protecting elective planned diagnostic services. The remainder of the funding will increase capacity for imaging, endoscopy as well as lung and mammography screening, and improve digital diagnostics.

13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an estimate of the annual cost of moving social care workers onto a single contract and set of terms and conditions.

There are no current plans to make an estimate.

Most care workers are employed by private sector providers who set their pay and terms and conditions, independent of central Government.

In ‘Next steps to put People at the Heart of Care’, we announced our intention to launch a new Care Workforce Pathway for Adult Social Care, which will support development and provide a career structure to the workforce.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions he has had with (a) NHS England and (b) the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee on funding for community pharmacies through the Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework for (i) 2024-25 and (ii) 2025-26.

The NHS Long Term Workforce Plan (LTWP), backed by over £2.4 billion to fund additional education and training places over the next five years, sets out the steps the National Health Service and education providers need to take to deliver an NHS workforce that meets the changing needs of the population over the next 15 years. The ambition is to increase training places for pharmacists by nearly 50% to around 5,000 by 2031/32, and to grow the number of pharmacy technicians.

The LTWP also commits to extend the success of the Additional Roles Reimbursement Scheme, which has delivered an additional 29,000 multi-professional roles in primary care. This expansion will consider the additional capacity required to staff roles across primary

TARGET DATE 18/07/2023

care, including community pharmacy. NHS England have committed to undertake and publish a review of the scheme by the end of 2023.

Overseas pharmacy professionals must meet the same standards as United Kingdom pharmacy professionals. The General Pharmaceutical Council has recently written to accredited educational providers to highlight the demand for places from overseas professionals and students, and a limited number of additional places have been created.

The Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework (CPCF) 2019-24 five-year deal ends at the end of March 2024. We are currently consulting Community Pharmacy England on the implementation of the pharmacy proposals in the delivery plan for recovering access to primary care. The funding for those proposals covers 2023/24 and 2024/25. There are regular discussions with NHS England about NHS funding. No discussions have been had with Community Pharmacy England about CPCF funding from March 2024.

10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to help community pharmacies to recruit from overseas.

The NHS Long Term Workforce Plan (LTWP), backed by over £2.4 billion to fund additional education and training places over the next five years, sets out the steps the National Health Service and education providers need to take to deliver an NHS workforce that meets the changing needs of the population over the next 15 years. The ambition is to increase training places for pharmacists by nearly 50% to around 5,000 by 2031/32, and to grow the number of pharmacy technicians.

The LTWP also commits to extend the success of the Additional Roles Reimbursement Scheme, which has delivered an additional 29,000 multi-professional roles in primary care. This expansion will consider the additional capacity required to staff roles across primary

TARGET DATE 18/07/2023

care, including community pharmacy. NHS England have committed to undertake and publish a review of the scheme by the end of 2023.

Overseas pharmacy professionals must meet the same standards as United Kingdom pharmacy professionals. The General Pharmaceutical Council has recently written to accredited educational providers to highlight the demand for places from overseas professionals and students, and a limited number of additional places have been created.

The Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework (CPCF) 2019-24 five-year deal ends at the end of March 2024. We are currently consulting Community Pharmacy England on the implementation of the pharmacy proposals in the delivery plan for recovering access to primary care. The funding for those proposals covers 2023/24 and 2024/25. There are regular discussions with NHS England about NHS funding. No discussions have been had with Community Pharmacy England about CPCF funding from March 2024.

10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of the Additional Roles Reimbursement Scheme on recruitment for community pharmacies.

The NHS Long Term Workforce Plan (LTWP), backed by over £2.4 billion to fund additional education and training places over the next five years, sets out the steps the National Health Service and education providers need to take to deliver an NHS workforce that meets the changing needs of the population over the next 15 years. The ambition is to increase training places for pharmacists by nearly 50% to around 5,000 by 2031/32, and to grow the number of pharmacy technicians.

The LTWP also commits to extend the success of the Additional Roles Reimbursement Scheme, which has delivered an additional 29,000 multi-professional roles in primary care. This expansion will consider the additional capacity required to staff roles across primary

TARGET DATE 18/07/2023

care, including community pharmacy. NHS England have committed to undertake and publish a review of the scheme by the end of 2023.

Overseas pharmacy professionals must meet the same standards as United Kingdom pharmacy professionals. The General Pharmaceutical Council has recently written to accredited educational providers to highlight the demand for places from overseas professionals and students, and a limited number of additional places have been created.

The Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework (CPCF) 2019-24 five-year deal ends at the end of March 2024. We are currently consulting Community Pharmacy England on the implementation of the pharmacy proposals in the delivery plan for recovering access to primary care. The funding for those proposals covers 2023/24 and 2024/25. There are regular discussions with NHS England about NHS funding. No discussions have been had with Community Pharmacy England about CPCF funding from March 2024.

10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to increase pharmacist (a) training and (b) university places.

The NHS Long Term Workforce Plan (LTWP), backed by over £2.4 billion to fund additional education and training places over the next five years, sets out the steps the National Health Service and education providers need to take to deliver an NHS workforce that meets the changing needs of the population over the next 15 years. The ambition is to increase training places for pharmacists by nearly 50% to around 5,000 by 2031/32, and to grow the number of pharmacy technicians.

The LTWP also commits to extend the success of the Additional Roles Reimbursement Scheme, which has delivered an additional 29,000 multi-professional roles in primary care. This expansion will consider the additional capacity required to staff roles across primary

TARGET DATE 18/07/2023

care, including community pharmacy. NHS England have committed to undertake and publish a review of the scheme by the end of 2023.

Overseas pharmacy professionals must meet the same standards as United Kingdom pharmacy professionals. The General Pharmaceutical Council has recently written to accredited educational providers to highlight the demand for places from overseas professionals and students, and a limited number of additional places have been created.

The Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework (CPCF) 2019-24 five-year deal ends at the end of March 2024. We are currently consulting Community Pharmacy England on the implementation of the pharmacy proposals in the delivery plan for recovering access to primary care. The funding for those proposals covers 2023/24 and 2024/25. There are regular discussions with NHS England about NHS funding. No discussions have been had with Community Pharmacy England about CPCF funding from March 2024.

2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much and what proportion of social care pay was funded through local authority fees in the latest period for which data is available.

The Department is not able to make an assessment of the percentage of social care pay bill costs funded through local authority fees. This is because most of the adult social care workforce are employed by private sector providers who set their pay and terms and conditions, independent of central Government. Local authorities work with care providers to determine state-funded fee rates, which should take account of wage costs, based on local market conditions.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions he has had with (a) NHS England and (b) the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee on the level of funding for community pharmacies through the Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework for (i) 2024-25 and (b) 2025-26.

No discussions regarding the levels of future funding for community pharmacies through the Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework (CPCF) for 2024-25 and 2025-26 have been held with the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee (PSNC). However, the PSNC have, during formal consultation on years four and five of the current five-year deal, made a case for more funding. The Department and NHS England are jointly considering what should follow the end of the current CPCF 2019-24 five-year deal.

In September 2022, as part of the agreement for years four and five of the current CPCF 2019-24 five-year deal, NHS England committed to working with the sector to undertake an independent economic analysis of NHS pharmaceutical services. This review will help inform the negotiation of the future contractual framework for community pharmacy.

23rd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps she is taking to ensure organ donors are aware that they must inform NHS Blood and Transplant of which organs they wish to donate.

In May 2020, the law around organ donation in England changed to an ‘opt out’ system. NHS Blood and Transplant undertakes regular campaigns to encourage the public to make their organ donation decision known to their family and inform the NHS Organ Donor Register. The Register allows individuals to record which organs they would wish to donate.

Since September 2021, organ donation and transplantation has been taught through the secondary school curriculum in England, aimed at promoting awareness in young people. In addition, the Department recently supported Organ Donation Week.

19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to improve access to menopause services.

The government recognises that menopause services need to improve which is why the menopause will be a priority area in our Women’s Health Strategy, to be published later this year.

The NHS Menopause Improvement Programme will also improve access to menopause care in line with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines, helping to educate healthcare professionals and raise awareness for women, and the UK Menopause Taskforce is working to share best practice in improving menopause care across the UK.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that people register their organ donation decision on the NHS Organ Donor Register.

NHS Blood and Transplant promotes organ donation through its campaign activities and partnerships. It encourages the public to make their organ donation decision known to their family through the ‘Leave them Certain’ campaign and register on the NHS Organ Donor Register.

In 2022/23, NHS Blood and Transplant is expanding its commercial, public sector and community partnerships and will provide public engagement activity, such as Organ Donation Week. NHS Blood and Transplant also works with the Community Investment Scheme supporting 35 grassroots, community and faith-based organisations to raise awareness of organ donation.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much NHS England spent on machine perfusion used in organ transplantation in each of the last five years.

NHS Blood and Transplant is the organisation responsible for matching, allocating and retrieving organs for transplant in the United Kingdom. Machine perfusion is a technique used to preserve organs, enabling more organs to be successfully transplanted.

In 2019, NHS England and NHS Improvement and NHS Blood and Transplant invested in a three-year innovation fund of £5 million to support the use of machine perfusion for heart donation after circulatory death (DCD). The following table shows funding for machine perfusion for DCD in each year since from 2017/2018 to 2020/2021. Data for 2021/22 is not yet available.

Financial year

Total

Funding from NHS England and NHS Improvement

Funding from NHS Blood and Transplant

2017/2018

£0

£0

£0

2018/2019

£0

£0

£0

2019/2020

£782,066

£391,033

£391,033

2020/2021

£1,303,176

£651,588

£651,588

Source: NHS Blood and Transplant

Note:

Funding for DCD covers payments for staffing and consumables. Transportation costs associated with these retrievals have not been included but are estimated to be £450,000 per annum.

The following table shows NHS Blood and Transplant expenditure on machine perfusion for liver DCD in each year from 2017/18. Information for 2021/22 is not yet available.

Financial year

Total

2017/2018

£0

2018/2019

£162,437

2019/2020

£225,286

2020/2021

£239,136

Source: NHS Blood and Transplant.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has made direct international comparisons to other western European countries on the potential merits of investment to improve public awareness of organ donation.

NHS Blood and Transplant is the organisation responsible for raising public awareness of organ donation in England. In 2020, NHS Blood and Transplant reviewed international evidence on organ donation and donors sharing their decision with their families. While evidence was limited, similar themes emerged, particularly concerning ethnic minority communities. Where there is awareness of organ donation, in general the public understand the need to have conversations and share their decision with their families. Conversely, where awareness is low, there is a lack of understanding for the need to share their decision.

These themes have been addressed in NHS Blood and Transplant’s ‘Leave Them Certain' campaign, launched in February 2021 and supported by an investment f £3,300,000.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
1st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to help improve public awareness of organ donation.

NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) promotes organ donation in a number of ways including Organ Donation Week in September and the ‘Leave them Certain’ campaign.

NHSBT launched a multi-channel campaign to inform the public of the change to an opt-out system for organ donation in May 2020. Figures indicated 75% of the population were aware of the law change in December 2020.

NHSBT’s Community Investment Scheme has a specific focus on engaging with Black and South Asian communities. The programme supports 35 grassroot, community and faith-based organisations to raise awareness of organ donation, seven organisations have received a share of £100,000 funding for living donation.

Since September 2021, organ donation and transplantation has been taught as part of the secondary school curriculum in England, aimed at promoting awareness in young people.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that young people with asthma and other respiratory problems, who received their first and second covid-19 vaccination early are prioritised for the booster dose having now waited over six months between doses.

On 22 December 2021, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) advised that at-risk children aged 12 to 15 years old, including those with poorly controlled asthma, should be offered a booster dose a minimum of three months after completion of the primary vaccination schedule. From 17 January 2022, the National Health Service began administering booster doses to those who had completed their primary vaccination at least three months ago prior to that date. Eligible children, including those with poorly controlled asthma, have been contacted by local NHS services to arrange their appointments.

The booster programme which began in September 2021 prioritised young people aged 16 years old and above with health conditions at greater risk from COVID-19. This included those with chronic respiratory diseases including severe asthma.

12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to use the £5.9 billion NHS COVID recovery funding, announced at the Spending Review on 27 October 2021, to tackle the backlog in assessments for disabled children’s health services.

On 6 September 2021 we announced over £8 billion for the National Health Service to provide elective care that was delayed by the pandemic for the Spending Review period 2022/23 to 2024/25. We also announced an additional £5.4 billion to support the COVID-19 response over the next six months, bringing the total Government support for health services in response to COVID-19 to over £34 billion in 2021/22. This includes £2 billion to tackle the elective backlog and reduce waiting times for patients, including disabled children.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support is available to people with the cost of purchasing a blood pressure monitor where GPs require patients to take blood pressure readings at home.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are supporting local systems to facilitate patients to remotely manage their blood pressure, where appropriate. Approximately 200,000 monitors have been made available for distribution.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to tackle social isolation experienced by disabled children and their families during the covid-19 outbreak.

In 2020/21 we allocated £3.6 million to voluntary and community sector organisations to support autistic people, people with a learning disability and disabled people, including disabled children and their families, throughout the pandemic. This funded services providing direct, practical support for their physical and mental wellbeing including learning and play opportunities for disabled children to help combat social isolation and accessible arts, sports and wellbeing activities for children and adults with complex disabilities. In addition, through the ‘COVID-19 mental health and wellbeing recovery action plan’, we have invested over £31.5 million in organisations supporting people who experience loneliness, refreshed our Let’s Talk Loneliness campaign, and brought together a Tackling Loneliness Network.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ensure that every disabled child with an Education, Health and Care plan can access therapies, health appointments and other services when required.

We are working with the Department for Education and NHS England and NHS Improvement to improve the provision of health service therapies to disabled children. NHS England and NHS Improvement’s guidance makes clear that essential community services, including therapeutic support, must be prioritised for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities aged up to 25 years old and who have an Education Health and Care Plan in place or who are going through an assessment.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to allow up to six visitors to a care home resident at any one time if that visit is outdoors as restrictions are eased during the covid-19 outbreak.

We published updated guidance on visiting in care homes on 22 April, which states every care home should ensure that each resident can nominate up to two named people who can have regular, indoor visits. Those residents with higher care needs can also nominate an ‘essential care giver’ who will have the same testing and personal protective equipment arrangements as care home staff so that they can also provide extra support, such as help with washing and dressing or eating well. We want to go further and allow more visitors, where the data tells us it is safe to do so.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to bring forward legislation to criminalise controlling or coercive behaviour by people providing psychotherapy or counselling services.

We have no plans to do so.

Anyone seeking out the services of a psychotherapist or counsellor can check that they are on an Accredited Voluntary Register accredited by the Professional Standards Authority (PSA). The PSA provides assurances of voluntary registers of health and care professionals and currently accredits 10 registers relating to psychotherapy and counselling covering around 50,000 talking therapy professionals.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that charitable organisations providing (a) mental health, (b) learning disability and (c) autism services in receipt of public funds provide adequate levels of service during the covid-19 outbreak.

During the COVID-19 outbreak the Government provided over £10 million of additional funding to mental health, learning disability and autism charities to support adults and children. We have also provided local authorities with £3.7 billion for COVID-19 pressures, including social care services provided by charitable organisations. Where charitable organisations are in receipt of funding from the Government, robust governance and assurance processes are in place to manage the effective use of funding to achieve agreed outcomes.

Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for the planning and commissioning of healthcare services for their local population, which includes commissioning charitable organisations to provide services. However, they must be assured of the quality of services they commission, taking into account both National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines and the Care Quality Commission’s data about service providers. Local authorities are responsible for commissioning social care services and ensuring quality standards with providers.

26th Apr 2022
What recent steps her Department has taken to increase humanitarian support to the Afghan people.

Last month we co-hosted a donor conference with the UN, Qatar and Germany. This raised over $2.4 billion for the UN’s humanitarian appeal.

Ahead of the summit, the Foreign Secretary announced the UK’s pledge of £286 million for Afghanistan this financial year.

The Foreign Secretary has committed to prioritising funding for women and girls. In Afghanistan, we will ensure at least 50% of those we reach with our aid should be women and girls.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has had discussions with Cash Access UK on the opening hours of banking hubs.

The Government believes that all customers, wherever they live, should have appropriate access to banking and cash services, and I would like to assure you that I am monitoring the issue of branch closures closely. Whilst decisions to open or close a branch are commercial decisions for banks, it is imperative that banks and building societies recognise the needs of all their customers, including those who still need to use in-person services.

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA)’s guidance is clear that firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of planned branch closures on their customers’ everyday banking and cash access needs, and put in place alternatives, where this is reasonable. This seeks to ensure the implementation of closure decisions is done in a way that treats customers fairly. Where firms fall short of expectations, the FCA may ask for closures to be paused or other options to be put in place.

Alternative options to access everyday banking services can be via telephone banking, through digital means such as mobile or online banking and via the Post Office or Banking Hubs. The Post Office allows personal and business customers to carry out everyday banking services at 11,500 Post Office branches across the UK.

Banking Hubs are a voluntary industry initiative, which enable customers of participating banks to access cash and banking services in shared facilities. As such, decisions regarding their operation, including opening hours, are taken by participating banks. Over 100 Banking Hubs have been announced so far, including in Sidmouth. 33 Banking Hubs are already open across the UK, and the Government hopes to see the others open as soon as possible.

Bim Afolami
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to help prevent the closure of banks in East Devon constituency.

The Government believes that all customers, wherever they live, should have appropriate access to banking and cash services, and I would like to assure you that I am monitoring the issue of branch closures closely. Whilst decisions to open or close a branch are commercial decisions for banks, it is imperative that banks and building societies recognise the needs of all their customers, including those who still need to use in-person services.

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA)’s guidance is clear that firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of planned branch closures on their customers’ everyday banking and cash access needs, and put in place alternatives, where this is reasonable. This seeks to ensure the implementation of closure decisions is done in a way that treats customers fairly. Where firms fall short of expectations, the FCA may ask for closures to be paused or other options to be put in place.

Alternative options to access everyday banking services can be via telephone banking, through digital means such as mobile or online banking and via the Post Office or Banking Hubs. The Post Office allows personal and business customers to carry out everyday banking services at 11,500 Post Office branches across the UK.

Banking Hubs are a voluntary industry initiative, which enable customers of participating banks to access cash and banking services in shared facilities. As such, decisions regarding their operation, including opening hours, are taken by participating banks. Over 100 Banking Hubs have been announced so far, including in Sidmouth. 33 Banking Hubs are already open across the UK, and the Government hopes to see the others open as soon as possible.

Bim Afolami
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of reducing VAT charged on property repairs required as a result of damage caused by flooding.

VAT is a broad-based tax on consumption and the twenty per cent standard rate applies to most goods and services. Whilst there are exceptions to the standard rate, these have always been limited by both legal and fiscal considerations.

Introducing new reliefs would impose additional pressure on the public finances to which VAT makes a significant contribution. VAT is the UK’s third largest tax and is forecast to raise £161 billion in 2023/24, helping to fund key spending priorities, such as the NHS, education and defence. Plus, there is no guarantee that a VAT relief would be passed on to consumers in the form of lower prices.

That is why the government has instead put in place a comprehensive framework to support flood recovery, which is used in exceptional circumstances to support councils and communities following severe flooding.

Whilst the government keeps all taxes under review, there are no current plans to reduce VAT charged on property repairs required as a result of damage caused by flooding.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Mar 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will place in the Library a list of (a) public sector pension schemes and (b) other occupational pension schemes which are treated as a non-registered scheme by HM Revenue & Customs.

Under the Commissioners for Revenue and Customs Act 2005 (CRCA), HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has a statutory duty of confidentiality to protect the information it holds about taxpayers. As a result, it is not possible to confirm the tax status of individual schemes, but many schemes will have made public statements separate to this.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what fiscal steps he is taking through the tax system to help support small cider producers.

The Government is introducing comprehensive alcohol duty reforms from 1 August this year, which will support small cider producers through the introduction of the new Small Producer Relief, providing a tapered duty discount which helps small beer and cider producers to grow and thrive.

The Government is also providing a duty discount on draught cider sold in pubs, whilst equalising the treatment of fruit ciders with beer. Further, ciders between 3.5% and 8.5% ABV will continue to benefit from a lower duty rate than other categories of alcohol to support their transition to the new duty system.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much revenue has been raised from the 3 per cent stamp duty surcharge placed on second homes from 2016 onwards as of 29 November 2021.

The values have been published in the quarterly Stamp Duty Land Tax publication: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/quarterly-stamp-duty-land-tax-sdlt-statistics

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to widen the scope of the temporary reduced rate of VAT for hospitality, holiday accommodation and attractions to include leisure and entertainment attractions such as (a) indoor go-karting venues and (b) ice rinks opening from Step 3 of the Roadmap on the easing of lockdown restrictions.

The temporary reduced rate of VAT (5 per cent) was introduced on 15 July 2020 to support the cash flow and viability of about 150,000 businesses and protect over 2.4 million jobs in the hospitality and tourism sectors.

Hospitality for the purposes of this relief includes the supply of food and non-alcoholic beverages from restaurants, cafes, pubs and similar establishments for consumption on the premises.

It also includes the supply of hot food and non-alcoholic hot beverages to take away. Where a business provides such hospitality, that hospitality will benefit from the reduced rate.

Admission charges that entitle a person to participate in events where the primary focus is a sporting activity will not generally be eligible for the temporary reduced rate. If businesses are in any doubt about whether they are supplying sporting facilities, they should consult VAT Notice 701/45.

3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to extend Social Investment Tax Relief beyond April 2021.

The Social Investment Tax Relief (SITR) was introduced in 2014 to incentivise risk finance investments in qualifying social enterprises and charities. HMRC statistics show that up to 2018-19, about 110 enterprises have used the scheme to raise £11.2 million.

The Government keeps all taxes and reliefs under review in order to ensure they continue to meet policy objectives and represent value for money for taxpayers. The Government previously published a Call for Evidence in 2019 on SITR’s use to date. A response to the consultation will be published in due course and a decision on SITR’s future will be announced at the Budget ahead of its sunset clause in April 2021.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to prevent temporary NHS staff being charged employer National Insurance Contributions by umbrella recruitment companies.

Umbrella companies, like all employers in the UK, are responsible for paying employer NICs.

Umbrella companies are paid a fee by an employment agency to supply a worker to its end client. From that fee they pay their own liabilities such as employer NICs. The remainder after those payments forms the worker’s gross pay, from which the worker pays Income Tax and employee NICs. Like other employers, an umbrella company is required to account for the Income Tax and employee NICs directly to HMRC under Pay As You Earn.

In April 2020 the Government legislated to introduce a key facts page for agency workers to clarify how their terms of engagement affect their pay prospects. The key facts page must explain the deductions from pay.

Further information is on GOV.UK: www.gov.uk/government/publications/providing-a-key-information-document-for-agency-workers-guidance-for-employment-businesses.

14th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 4 September 2020 to Question 85130, on Trade Unions, if he will publish anonymised figures for (a) the totality of funding given to trade unions, as employers in their own right, to date under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, and (b) how many individual trade unions have claimed under the scheme, according to figures held by HM Revenue and Customs.

HMRC have published data on Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme claims by three-digit SIC2007 code for all claims for March to June 2020. This shows that PAYE schemes classified in the category SIC2007 94.2 Activities of Trade Unions made claims under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to the value of £2 million for this period. In all, claims were made by about 100 employers in this category.

The data covers those organisations classified as SIC2007 94.2 Activities of Trade Unions by the Interdepartmental Business Register (IDBR). Amounts are rounded to the nearest million and counts to the nearest hundred.


This data is available on GOV.UK under CJRS claims by detailed sector (three-digit SIC2007): https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/coronavirus-job-retention-scheme-statistics-august-2020.

18th May 2020
What fiscal steps he is taking to support the charity sector during the covid-19 outbreak.

Alongside unprecedented support for individuals and businesses in light of the COVID-19 outbreak, the Government has announced a £750 million support package for charities.

£360m of this will be allocated directly to charities providing essential services and supporting vulnerable people, including up to £200m for hospices across the next quarter.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
24th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress her Department has made on extending the Youth Mobility Scheme.

We remain committed to negotiating Youth Mobility Scheme (YMS) arrangements with other countries and territories, including the EU or nations within it. On 01 January, Iceland became a new addition to the scheme demonstrating the Government’s commitment to further expansion.

However, as each YMS is subject to a bilateral, reciprocal agreement which also provides benefit to UK nationals with the detail negotiated and agreed between the relevant parties, we are unable to disclose the status of negotiations as they occur. Further details of additional YMS agreements will be announced once they are concluded.

24th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Migration Advisory Committee’s review of the Shortage Occupation List will be asked to consider the potential merits of treating occupations at qualification Level 1 and qualification Level 2 the same.

The Government intends to commission the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) to undertake a review of the Shortage Occupation List (SOL) later this year. The exact terms of the commission will be set out in a letter to the Chair of the MAC and will be published on GOV.UK, in line with the approach taken for previous SOL commissions.

More broadly, acting upon advice from the MAC, the Government broadened out the skills threshold of the Skilled Worker route to include occupations at RQF level 3 and lowered the general salary threshold to £25,600. The MAC’s modelling suggests the new threshold strikes a reasonable balance between controlling immigration and providing businesses access to labour.

Being on the SOL does not exempt an occupation from meeting the wider requirements of the Skilled Worker immigration route.

31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of whether chefs, occupation code 5434, should be added to the Shortage Occupation List.

Up until 6 April 2021, Chefs were on the Shortage Occupation List. The Government accepted a recommendation from the independent Migration Advisory Committee to remove Chefs from the SOL citing;

‘…the reduced restrictions and lower salary threshold under the Skilled Worker route compared to Tier 2 (General), and the on-going and persistent concerns that not enough is being done to train chefs from within the domestic workforce.’

Due to the expanded eligibility under our new system, for both salary and skill levels, chefs may now be recruited through the Skilled Worker visa without the requirement to demonstrate 5 years experience, and they can be paid £25,600 or more per year rather than the previous threshold of £29,570.

A job does not have to be on the Shortage Occupation List (SOL) to qualify for the Skilled Worker visa and being on it does not exempt a job from other requirements such as the English Language requirement.

Our Plan for Jobs is focused on helping people across the country retrain, build new skills and get back into work, rather than providing alternatives to this via immigration policy. Beyond the Points Based System, there is the resident labour market which includes UK workers and non-UK citizens with general work rights.

14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to allow people with existing DBS clearance to use that as evidence for other DBS-required roles they may undertake.

There is no requirement to obtain a new DBS certificate each time an individual goes from one role to another, as a volunteer or paid worker in a regulated activity in the same workforce e.g. children’s workforce.

The Update Service is an online subscription for standard and enhanced checks (i.e. those which individuals working with children and vulnerable people or employers will be checking against). The Update Service enables an individual to take their DBS certificate from one job to the next unless an employer asks an individual to get a new certificate, or a different type of workforce certificate is needed, e.g. ‘adult workforce’ to ‘child workforce,’ or a different level of certificate is required, e.g. standard to enhanced.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether plans she has to enable au pairs to work in the UK under the points-based immigration system.

The UK’s points-based immigration system will not offer a dedicated route for au pairs, as has been the case since 2008. However, there are other immigration routes which will exist for people who may wish to take up these roles, such as the Youth Mobility Scheme (YMS).

We have indicated our desire to negotiate a YMS with the EU, or with individual countries within it, ensuring young people can continue to enjoy the social, cultural and educational benefits of living in the EU and the UK.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Public Immunity Interest Immunity Procedures have been (a) applied for and (b) granted by Devon and Cornwall Police in each of the last 10 years.

The Justice and Security Act 2013 deals with oversight of the UK intelligence and security agencies and sets out the process by which closed material proceedings may be authorised to enable court hearings to take place using sensitive intelligence material.

The Home Office does not hold information on applications to the courts for Public Interest Immunity.

The Ministry of Justice publishes regular reports on the use of closed material proceedings under the Justice and Security Act 2013. These can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/use-of-closed-material-procedure-reports.

5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to increase innovation in defence technologies.

The Defence Command Paper highlighted the importance of science, innovation and technology in securing strategic advantage for our Armed Forces. Defence is investing over £6.6 billion in advanced Research and Development, and is working closely with UK industry and academia, to identify and invest in innovative technologies to ensure we have the capabilities we need to meet threats.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to support British shipbuilding.

The National Shipbuilding Strategy supports our ambition to grow the UK shipbuilding enterprise and support UK jobs. Five new T31 frigates being built in Rosyth will support more than 1,000 UK jobs. The Fleet Solid Support contract will create more than 1,200 UK shipyard jobs and Type 26 will sustain over 4,000 jobs across the UK supply chain.

5th Jul 2021
What steps his Department is taking to support veterans.

This Government is committed to ensuring that veterans receive a gold standard of support and the recognition they deserve so that the UK becomes the best place in the world to be a veteran.

Later this year we will publish the next iteration of the Veterans Strategy Action Plan setting how we’ll ensure veterans can lead successful civilian lives, this will build on the steps we have already taken through improved support for employment, housing and access to healthcare.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Dec 2020
What assessment he has made of the effectiveness of recent Royal Navy deployments to the Black Sea.

HMS DRAGON and HMS ENTERPRISE have both recently operated in the Black Sea conducting a highly successful programme of regional defence engagement activity with Georgia, Ukraine and Romania. This included joint exercising with the Ukrainian and Romanian Navies to share expertise and knowledge, as well as delivery of a package of maritime interdiction training to the Georgian Coastguard. This is a further demonstration of the UK’s ability to provide reassurance to allies and partners, as well as a deterrent effect across the Euro-Atlantic area.

17th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, when he plans to consult on making water companies statutory consultees on certain planning applications.

The Government committed during the passage of the Levelling-up and Regeneration Act 2023 to consult on whether water companies should become statutory consultees on certain planning applications, and if so, how best to do this. The Secretary of State has since commissioned Sam Richards, to undertake an independent review of statutory consultees within the planning system, with the recommendations from this to be published in March 2024.

We remain committed to this consultation; which will be published later this year. Water companies must continue to engage local planning authorities on their applications at the right time so they can input effectively and not slow down the application process.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how many staff are working in the Levelling Up Unit in his Department.

As of 28 April 2023, there are over 700 FTE staff working in the Department’s Levelling Up Group.

To drive delivery of the levelling up agenda, a Director General led group was established under Will Garton, Director General for Levelling Up. The group includes director led units working on strategy and policy, place, delivery, spatial data, funds and area teams based around the country. The group are responsible for work including, but not limited to Investment Zones, Levelling Up Partnerships, Freeports, the devolution agenda in England including the recent Trailblazer agreements secured with Greater Manchester and the West Midlands, the department’s role on Anti-Social Behaviour, the Levelling Up Fund, the UK Shared Prosperity Fund, the Community Ownership Fund, legacy funds as well as servicing the Levelling Up Inter Ministerial Group and wider cross-cutting Levelling Up priorities (including the Levelling Up Missions). This activity is support by the Spatial Data Unit and the department’s analytical capability.

Other portfolios within the department’s wider senior leadership team also ensure that Levelling Up is the central mission of the department. There are currently Groups covering Local Government, Resilience and Communities; Building Safety, Grenfell and Net Zero; Regeneration (specifically Housing); Finance; and the Union. Further details will be set out in the department’s organogram which will be updated and published in due course on gov.uk

In early 2022, prior to the establishment of the Levelling Up group and the wider departmental reorganisation, the former Second Permanent Secretary led an external recruitment process for Levelling Up Directors. There were over 500 applicants, but – given the wider departmental changes - Ministers have decided not to proceed with the appointment of the directors.

This renewed and significant senior departmental capacity, combined with the progress of the English devolution agenda, means that we believe that we are best placed to deliver levelling up by working directly with Mayoral Combined Authorities, local government, and the devolved administrations. We will continue to co-ordinate government policy via means of specific, targeted placed based interventions. We are grateful for all those who showed an interest in the roles, and for the work of the Civil Service Commissioner who supported this recruitment.

The department will continue to keep under review its staffing dedicated to its priorities including work driving Levelling Up across the whole of the UK.

8th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, when the Government plans to respond to the Law Commission’s recommendations relating to National Trust leaseholders, published on 21 July 2020 in the report entitled Leasehold home ownership: buying your freehold or extending your lease, HC584 of Session 2019-21.

The Government is committed to creating a fairer and more transparent housing system that works for everyone. Leasehold reform supports our mission to level up homeownership by addressing the power imbalance at the heart of the leasehold system.

In 2017 the Government asked the Law Commission to review existing leasehold legislation. The Law Commission's findings, published in 2020, made clear that under the current system too many leaseholders find the process for extending their lease or buying their freehold too complex, lacking transparency and prohibitively expensive. The Law Commission made a number of recommendations and the government will respond to these, including those relating to National Trust leaseholders, in due course.

8th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what legislative steps he plans to take to ensure National Trust leaseholders can extend their leases; and in what circumstances those leases would be extendable.

The Government is committed to creating a fairer and more transparent housing system that works for everyone. Leasehold reform supports our mission to level up homeownership by addressing the power imbalance at the heart of the leasehold system.

In 2017 the Government asked the Law Commission to review existing leasehold legislation. The Law Commission's findings, published in 2020, made clear that under the current system too many leaseholders find the process for extending their lease or buying their freehold too complex, lacking transparency and prohibitively expensive. The Law Commission made a number of recommendations and the government will respond to these, including those relating to National Trust leaseholders, in due course.

14th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, whether he has made an assessment of the potential implications for his policies of allowing local authorities to object to planning applications for solar farms due to there being too many (a) already built and (b) pending in the local area.

The Government’s recent ‘British Energy Security Strategy’ sets out a series of changes to the planning system to support the delivery of renewable energy infrastructure. These technologies will play a key role in reaching the UK’s ambitious Carbon Budget and Net Zero targets. We will consult on amending planning rules to strengthen policy in favour of solar development on non-protected land, while ensuring communities continue to have a say and environmental protections remain in place.

Solar projects are subject to strict planning controls to protect local communities and the environment. For larger projects (over 50MW in England), planning decisions are made through the Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects (NSIP) regime. The NSIP regime is a rigorous process designed to scrutinise larger projects and developers must engage closely with local authorities and communities before approval is granted.

By law, planning applications are determined on their own merits in accordance with the development plan for the area unless material considerations indicate otherwise. There may be occasions though where other existing or approved development may be relevant in determining an application, in particular where it is integral as part of a more substantial development. It is for local planning authorities to consider proposals, they act independently of central Government, and Ministers have limited remit to intervene in their day-to-day affairs, particularly where it is integral as part of a more substantial development.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, whether he plans to extend the 56 day rule for temporary campsites into 2022.

Nationally set permitted development rights allow for temporary use of land. To support businesses during the COVID-19 restrictions we introduced a new right which increased the length of time during which land can be temporarily used for other purposes, and for moveable structures to be set up on the land. The time was increased from the existing allowances of 28 days generally, and 14 days for particular uses such as motorsports, to 56 days and 28 days respectively.

The right allowing for additional days is due to end on 31 December 2021. This decision was taken on balance, considering the wide nature of the right to allow for the use of land for any purpose and the impacts that this can have on communities.

8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans he has to amend the Planning Act 2008 to allow Town and Parish Councils to support emergency covid-19 community groups with funding that has been received through the Community Infrastructure Levy.

The Neighbourhood Share of the Community Infrastructure Levy ensures that up to 25 per cent of levy revenue is passed to a parish council in the area that development occurred, and provides considerable flexibility over the use of the funding. Parish councils can use the levy to fund anything concerned with addressing the potential demands that development places on their area. This includes provision which may respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, such as medical infrastructure.

More generally, the Secretary of State has written to principal authorities asking them to work closely with parish councils in order to ensure that the funding support provided to principal authorities has the maximum effect where it is most needed. We continue to encourage parish and town councils to work with their principal authority where they are delivering vital services that have been affected by COVID-19.

30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what his most recent estimate is of the number of housing units with planning permission; and for how many of those work (a) has started on site, (b) is due to start on site and (c) is not yet planned to start.

The latest quarterly National Statistics on planning applications* show that over the past three years 1.14 million housing units were granted planning permission. Planning permissions are typically valid for 3 years before expiry if construction has not commenced. As part of the Government’s ongoing development of the official statistics on housing and planning we are looking at ways to provide more information on the progress of sites with planning permission.

* Source: Table 5 https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/945387/Planning_Application_Statistics_-_July_to_September_2020_-_Statistical_Release.pdf

7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many requests were denied by his Department for the transfer of prisoners convicted of (a) rape and (b) other sexual offences to category D open prisons in each year between 1997 and 2010.

The Ministry of Justice holds data on the number of prisoners convicted of (a) rape and (b) other sexual offences who were held in a category D open prison in each year between 1997 and 2010. This can be viewed in the attached table. The required dates for PQ135716 (between 2007 and 2010) are a subset of the data required for PQ135715 and so are contained within the same attachment.

For prisoners serving indeterminate sentences, the data requested to answer question 3 is not held as it pre-dates current casework systems which came into use in 2010.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners convicted of (a) rape and (b) other sexual offences were held in a category D open prison in each year between 2007 and 2010.

The Ministry of Justice holds data on the number of prisoners convicted of (a) rape and (b) other sexual offences who were held in a category D open prison in each year between 1997 and 2010. This can be viewed in the attached table. The required dates for PQ135716 (between 2007 and 2010) are a subset of the data required for PQ135715 and so are contained within the same attachment.

For prisoners serving indeterminate sentences, the data requested to answer question 3 is not held as it pre-dates current casework systems which came into use in 2010.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners convicted of (a) rape and (b) other sexual offences were held in a category D open prison in each year between 1997 and 2010.

The Ministry of Justice holds data on the number of prisoners convicted of (a) rape and (b) other sexual offences who were held in a category D open prison in each year between 1997 and 2010. This can be viewed in the attached table. The required dates for PQ135716 (between 2007 and 2010) are a subset of the data required for PQ135715 and so are contained within the same attachment.

For prisoners serving indeterminate sentences, the data requested to answer question 3 is not held as it pre-dates current casework systems which came into use in 2010.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
29th Jun 2021
What steps his Department is taking to support the recovery of the justice system after the covid-19 outbreak.

In response to the pressures of the pandemic, prisons moved rapidly to prevent infection and minimise loss of life, the Probation Service introduced new delivery models, and in Courts and Tribunals we made quick safety adjustments to court buildings meaning that we were among the first internationally to re-start jury trials.

We remain committed to our continued recovery, rolling out vaccination in prisons, getting cases heard more quickly, and accelerating efforts to increase capacity. We will continue to innovate and improve so that we can build back better.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
4th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many Child Maintenance Service cases have been (a) received and (b) overturned by HM Courts & Tribunals Service in each of the last five years.

Information about (a) receipts and (b) outcomes for Child Maintenance Service appeals to the First-tier Tribunal (Social Security and Child Support) (SSCS) is published at www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics.

The latest period for which data are available is January to March 2020. The most recent tribunal statistics publication covering the period April to June 2020 does not include SSCS data due to issues identified as the Tribunal was being migrated to a new operational system. The data will be made available as soon as this is resolved and the data quality assured.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jan 2021
What discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on potential opportunities for Northern Ireland at COP26.

We are working closely with colleagues across Government and the NI Executive to support opportunities for Northern Ireland at this important event. This Government has announced a number of initiatives to promote Northern Ireland’s potential as a leader in innovative technology, especially in green and clean technologies. This includes the £400 million investment through the New Deal for Northern Ireland.

I recently attended a meeting with the COP President and pressed for continued engagement with the Executive and NI businesses in order to promote Northern Ireland’s interests. I also met with Laura Sandys, our former Hon. Friend, to discuss her work as an adviser to NI’s energy strategy.