Caroline Spelman Portrait

Caroline Spelman

Conservative - Former Member for Meriden

Second Church Estates Commissioner
21st May 2015 - 6th Nov 2019
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
31st Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Second Church Estates Commissioner
21st May 2015 - 6th Nov 2019
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
28th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
25th Feb 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Environmental Audit Committee
16th Dec 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Draft Modern Slavery Bill
9th Jan 2014 - 3rd Apr 2014
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
12th May 2010 - 6th Sep 2012
Shadow Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government
19th Jan 2009 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Minister without Portfolio
3rd Jul 2007 - 19th Jan 2009
Party Chair, Conservative Party
3rd Jul 2007 - 19th Jan 2009
Shadow Secretary of State (Office of the Deputy Prime Minister)
10th May 2005 - 3rd Jul 2007
Shadow Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government
1st May 2004 - 10th May 2005
Shadow Minister (Women)
1st Jul 2001 - 1st May 2004
Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
10th Nov 2003 - 1st May 2004
Shadow Secretary of State for International Development
1st Jul 2001 - 1st Nov 2003
Shadow Spokesperson (Health)
10th Jun 1999 - 10th Sep 2001
Opposition Whip (Commons)
10th Jun 1998 - 10th Jun 1999
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
14th Jul 1997 - 22nd Jun 1998
Science and Technology Committee
14th Jul 1997 - 22nd Jun 1998


Division Voting information

Caroline Spelman has voted in 2082 divisions, and 41 times against the majority of their Party.

17 Oct 2019 - Business of the House (Saturday 19 October) - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 263 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 287 Noes - 275
4 Sep 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 6) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 285 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 329 Noes - 300
4 Sep 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 6) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 285 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 327 Noes - 299
19 Jun 2019 - Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration and Renewal) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 115 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 203 Noes - 117
12 Jun 2019 - Leaving the EU: Business of the House - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Conservative Aye votes vs 289 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 309
3 Apr 2019 - Business of the House - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Conservative Aye votes vs 289 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 310 Noes - 310
3 Apr 2019 - Business of the House - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 14 Conservative Aye votes vs 291 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 312 Noes - 311
3 Apr 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 14 Conservative Aye votes vs 291 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 315 Noes - 310
3 Apr 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 15 Conservative No votes vs 287 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 304 Noes - 313
3 Apr 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 91 Conservative No votes vs 212 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 220 Noes - 400
3 Apr 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 14 Conservative Aye votes vs 290 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 313 Noes - 312
1 Apr 2019 - Business of the House - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 28 Conservative Aye votes vs 264 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 277
1 Apr 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship (Votes) - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 236 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 273 Noes - 276
1 Apr 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship (Votes) - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative Aye votes vs 228 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 261 Noes - 282
27 Mar 2019 - Business of the House - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 33 Conservative Aye votes vs 272 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 331 Noes - 287
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 94 Conservative No votes vs 157 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 160 Noes - 400
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 37 Conservative Aye votes vs 225 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 188 Noes - 283
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 59 Conservative Aye votes vs 200 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 377
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative Aye votes vs 234 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 264 Noes - 272
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 122 Conservative No votes vs 126 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 139 Noes - 422
25 Mar 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 30 Conservative Aye votes vs 281 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 329 Noes - 302
25 Mar 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Conservative Aye votes vs 294 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 311 Noes - 314
14 Mar 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 112 Conservative Aye votes vs 188 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 412 Noes - 202
13 Mar 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 291 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 312 Noes - 308
13 Mar 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 66 Conservative No votes vs 149 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 164 Noes - 374
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 17 Conservative Aye votes vs 295 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 310
31 Jan 2018 - Restoration and Renewal (Report of the Joint Committee) - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 66 Conservative Aye votes vs 164 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 236 Noes - 220
31 Jan 2018 - Restoration and Renewal (Report of the Joint Committee) - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 68 Conservative Aye votes vs 166 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 234 Noes - 185
23 Mar 2016 - High Speed Rail (London – West Midlands) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Conservative Aye votes vs 242 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 43 Noes - 245
24 Nov 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 47 Conservative Aye votes vs 117 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 204 Noes - 125
28 Apr 2014 - High Speed Rail (London – West Midlands) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative Aye votes vs 221 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 50 Noes - 451
7 Jan 2014 - Mesothelioma Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 241 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 247 Noes - 286
21 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 124 Conservative Aye votes vs 134 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 366 Noes - 161
20 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 48 Conservative No votes vs 139 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 391 Noes - 57
20 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 56 Conservative Aye votes vs 136 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 375
5 Feb 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 131 Conservative Aye votes vs 139 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 400 Noes - 175
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 93 Conservative Aye votes vs 139 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 267 Noes - 233
1 Apr 2009 - Nick Cousins - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 27 Conservative Aye votes vs 83 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 304 Noes - 103
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Conservative Aye votes vs 134 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 178 Noes - 392
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 75 Conservative Aye votes vs 96 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 267
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Caroline Spelman voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 55 Conservative Aye votes vs 121 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 337 Noes - 224
View All Caroline Spelman Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
John Bercow (Speaker)
(66 debate interactions)
Mary Creagh (Labour)
(43 debate interactions)
Barry Sheerman (Labour (Co-op))
(28 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Transport
(49 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(41 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Caroline Spelman's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Caroline Spelman

25th June 2019
Caroline Spelman signed this EDM on Tuesday 23rd July 2019

PUBLISHERS' ASSOCIATION'S CAMPAIGN AXE THE READING TAX

Tabled by: Neil Coyle (Independent - Bermondsey and Old Southwark)
That this House praises the fact that printed books, magazines and newspapers have been VAT exempt ever since the UK’s VAT regime was established in the 1970s to protect the accessibility of reading materials and the intrinsic value of reading and knowledge; notes that this principle should also apply to …
66 signatures
(Most recent: 7 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 31
Scottish National Party: 14
Conservative: 8
Liberal Democrat: 6
Independent: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Green Party: 1
The Independent Group for Change: 1
13th May 2019
Caroline Spelman signed this EDM on Tuesday 21st May 2019

IR35 OFF-PAYROLL TAX EXTENSION TO PRIVATE SECTOR

Tabled by: Ged Killen (Labour (Co-op) - Rutherglen and Hamilton West)
That this House notes with concern HM Treasury’s plans to extend the off-payroll (IR35) changes to the private sector; believes that this could damage the UK’s flexible workforce, reducing avenues for work and harm the economy; further notes that the extension could force thousands of contractors into false-employment, potentially costing …
38 signatures
(Most recent: 7 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 19
Conservative: 7
Liberal Democrat: 5
Scottish National Party: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
View All Caroline Spelman's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Caroline Spelman, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Caroline Spelman has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Caroline Spelman

Monday 2nd February 2015

6 Bills introduced by Caroline Spelman


To make provision for the giving of financial assistance for the purpose of securing the reduction of charges for the supply of water and the provision of sewerage services and in connection with the construction of, and the carrying out of works in respect of, water and sewerage infrastructure.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 1st May 2012 and was enacted into law.


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision about the registration of marriages.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 4th September 2018
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision about the registration of marriages.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 14th November 2017

A Bill to make provision about the registration of marriages.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Thursday 17th December 2015

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to amend legislation to improve the system of compensation for property blight caused by major national infrastructure projects; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 19th June 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to amend legislation to allow for noise contours to be used as a measure of property blight caused by national infrastructure projects; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 5th March 2013

52 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
10th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what support the Government is providing for early stage innovation in the low carbon sector.

The Government is expected to directly spend approximately £1.3billion on low carbon innovation (research, development and demonstration) in this spending review period (2011-15). This support is coordinated through the Low Carbon Innovation Coordination Group1 (LCICG).

Support beyond the end of this financial year is dependent on the outcome of the Spending Review.

1 http://www.lowcarboninnovation.co.uk/

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will take steps to address the barriers to remanufacturing identified in the All-Party Parliamentary Sustainable Resource Group's recent report on remanufacturing.

The Government welcomes the broad thrust of the All-Party Parliamentary Sustainable Resource Group's recent report Remanufacturing: Towards a resource efficient economy. It recognises the important role that remanufacturing has in supporting the long-term sustainability of the UK economy, encouraging resource resilience whilst boosting business opportunities and skilled employment.

BIS is working closely with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and across Whitehall on a number of areas touched on by the report; such as the regulatory regime that governs waste, where work is already in progress to ensure that it encourages greater re-use of materials in existing and developing manufacturing processes.

We will use the report to inform a number of areas of policy that impact on sustainability and remanufacturing.

14th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government's Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to support the UK automotive industry in the ambition set out in the that strategy to secure the UK’s position as a world leader in shaping the future of mobility.

The Government has a long-standing programme of support to maintain the competitiveness of the UK automotive sector. Through our Industrial Strategy and landmark Automotive Sector Deal, we are placing the UK at the forefront of new automotive technology development.

Government and industry have pledged joint commitment of £1 billion over 10 years to 2023 for the Advanced Propulsion Centre (APC) with three APC competitions running this year. Government has committed £246m to the Faraday Battery Challenge including £80m for the UK Battery Industrialisation Centre to scale up new technologies. And in the last Budget, Government committed up to £80m for research and development of electric motor technology. The Sector Deal also includes £32 million of joint funding for an industry-led supply chain competitiveness programme to help grow the UK supply chain and assure international competitiveness.

In May 2018, as part of the Future of Mobility Grand Challenge, my rt. hon. Friend the Prime Minister announced our intention for the UK to be at the forefront of the design and manufacturing of zero emission vehicles and in July we published Road to Zero to deliver on that commitment. As well as the technology investment, we have committed £1.5bn for consumer incentives, charging infrastructure and R&D to support the transition to zero emission vehicles.

We are determined to ensure that the UK continues to be one of the most competitive locations in the world for future automotive investment, alongside other advanced manufacturing.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
13th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to improve collaborative working between Government and industry.

Our Industrial Strategy sets out how we are building strong partnerships with businesses, academia, local government and devolved administrations.

Our Sector Deals, Grand Challenges and Local Industrial Strategies demonstrate how we are working collaboratively with industry to make the UK the best place to start and grow a business. We have published six sector deals so far on Life Sciences, Automotive, Creative Industries, Artificial Intelligence, Nuclear and Construction. The process allows for robust engagement and negotiation between industry and government leadership to ensure that we are working together effectively to tackle barriers to productivity. We have three more deals in negotiation with the Aerospace, Rail and Food and Drink sectors.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
7th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to prevent counterfeit electrical goods from entering the UK.

The Government views the problem of counterfeit electrical goods extremely seriously and a range of work is ongoing that aims to intercept and prevent all types of counterfeit products entering the UK.

The Government is working closely with a number of source countries around the world to prevent counterfeit goods being shipped. When suspected counterfeit items are identified at the UK’s borders, customs legislation enables goods arriving from outside the EU to be detained and destroyed, which prevents them from entering the UK market.

The National Trading Standards ‘Safety at Ports and Borders Teams’ work across 14 local authorities at ports, airports and postal hubs intercepting dangerous and illegal items, including electrical appliances. The UK is also part of the EU rapid alert system for dangerous consumer products.

This range of measures, together with proactive enforcement, is having a very positive preventative impact on the import of counterfeit goods.

18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what support his Department has provided to the horseracing industry following the recent equine influenza outbreak and suspension of racing.

The Horserace Betting Levy Board (HBLB) is an arms-length body of DCMS which is responsible for collecting a statutory Levy from betting operators which it distributes in line with its statutory duties to support British horse racing. In April 2017, the Government implemented significant reforms to the Levy, resulting in a £45m increase in statutory Levy income in 2017/18.

The HBLB provides over £200,000 annually for the Equine Influenza Programme, and a further £150,000 towards the Equine Infectious Disease Surveillance Programme, provides British racing with expert information and provisions to minimise the impact of equine diseases and respond quickly to outbreaks.

HBLB has committed to pay a contribution to owners or trainers for the costs incurred where the British Horseracing Authority (BHA) recently required test samples to be taken for equine influenza, including the cost of the swabs and the veterinary fees involved. In addition, HBLB has committed £321,500 to support the rescheduling of replacement races and fixtures following the recent suspension, and will continue discussions with the BHA regarding funding for further races and fixtures as required. The BHA have now scheduled a number of additional fixtures from February 20th onwards.

22nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what advice his Department is providing to the equine sector on the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation.

All UK businesses together with all organisations that process personal data will be required to comply with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) after 25th May 2018 and the UK's full data protection regime as set out in the Data Protection Bill. The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) provides guidance and support to UK organisations and have already published a number of resources on the Commissioner's website (ico.org.uk) to help organisations prepare. The ICO has: launched a dedicated helpline service for smaller organisations; updated its 'SME toolkit' to reflect the requirements of the GDPR; simplified its "12-step" GDPR preparation guidance; and published tailored guidance for charities.

16th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will change the funding for school children who receive their education outside of their own area, in order to enable the funding to follow the pupil.

We are committed to fairer school funding, where the money our schools receive matches their pupils’ needs. At the Spending Review, alongside protecting the schools budget in real terms, we announced our intention to deliver this by introducing a national funding formula for schools in 2017. That will mean children attract funding based on their individual characteristics, and not where they live, or whether the schools they attend are situated in other local authority areas. The amount of money following each pupil will be clear, and funding levels across the country will be transparent and fair. These are significant reforms and we will consult extensively in the New Year to ensure we get them right and to provide clarity and security for schools.

9th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many secondary and primary school pupils in England are educated by a local authority other than the one in which they reside.

Data from the January 2015 school census shows the number of primary and secondary school pupils who were educated at a school within a different local authority to the one in which they resided. This information is available in tables 12a and 12b of the ‘schools, pupils and their characteristics: January 2015’ statistical first release, published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2015

10th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the devolved administrations on future co-operation over shared environmental resources with neighbouring countries after the UK leaves the EU.

My Department has worked collaboratively with the Devolved Administrations to establish the Inter-Ministerial Group (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (IMG(EFRA)), which meets up to 10 times a year. My officials and I also have regular discussions with Devolved Administrations on a variety of topics, including on future co-operation over shared environmental resources with neighbouring countries, for example as part of the mapping of current North-South cooperation between Northern Ireland and Ireland.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
13th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government has ruled out the inclusion of the British Overseas Territories in plans to replace environment funding from the Financial Instrument for the Environment, LIFE, after the UK leaves the EU.

Funding for environment projects after the UK leaves the EU will be assessed as part of the forthcoming Spending Review. As announced in the Chancellor’s Spring Statement package on 13 March this year, the Government has published a call for evidence which invites ideas on how the British Overseas Territories’ biodiversity can be safeguarded: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/safeguarding-the-environment-in-british-overseas-territories-call-for-evidence/call-for-evidence-document.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent representations his Department has received on (a) violent threats and (b) demands made by gangs of tarmac workers to (i) farmers and (ii) rural landowners.

Defra officials have had recent meetings with the NFU, the National Rural Crime Network and the National Police Chiefs’ Council, to discuss crimes occurring in the countryside, including hare coursing, fly-tipping and theft from farms.

Incidences of criminal activity and threatening behaviour affecting farmers and rural landowners are a matter for the police.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
6th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effects on the equestrian sector of the UK leaving the EU.

We are undertaking a comprehensive programme of analytical work looking at the implications of UK withdrawal from the EU. The Government is examining all areas of the UK economy and seeking input from a wide range of businesses and industry bodies in order to inform our negotiations with the EU.

The Government’s priority for the equine sector in the context of leaving the EU, remains to ensure the continued movement of horses between the UK and EU, with the minimum of delay and bureaucracy, whilst at the same time providing appropriate disease control and welfare protection from Day 1 of EU Exit onwards. We have been working through a number of options in this area, considering a wide range of stakeholder views, and intend to embark on an extensive period of stakeholder engagement.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what information her Department holds on the application and interpretation of provisions in the Habitats Directive on bats inhabiting church premises in other EU member states.

Whilst we do not hold any information about how other Member States apply or interpret the provisions in the Habitats Directive in relation to bats in churches, the Government understands the problems that the presence of bats can cause.

To assist churches, Defra has funded research to identify techniques that can be used to deter bats from sensitive areas of churches, the results of which were published in March 2014. English Heritage is now funding a project trialling the techniques identified by this research in several churches to develop a toolkit and advice pack. A bid for Heritage Lottery funding to help pay for the implementation of this toolkit is also being prepared.

9th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make an assessment of the likelihood of nations to which the UK exports for incineration introducing similar measures to the Dutch government's planned incineration tax.

Defra has no current plans to assess the likelihood of nations, to which the UK exports for incineration, introducing similar measures to the Dutch government’s planned incineration tax.

Earlier this year we held a call for evidence on the Refuse Derived Fuel market in England, including the effect that exports had on its availability on the domestic market. We are currently analysing the evidence submitted.

10th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether there will be any new country programmes established in 2017.

DFID has no plans to open any new country programmes in 2017. However, in a changing world we remain well-placed to respond to changing circumstances and will continue to lead the global effort in responding to humanitarian crises wherever they arise.

10th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, when she will publish her Department's Country Operational Plans.

Material from country Business Plans, which have replaced Operational Plans, will be published in the Spring.

6th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how her Department ensures that aid finance is predictable and reliable for recipient countries.

The United Kingdom is the only G7 country to legislate on its promise to provide 0.7% gross national income towards helping the world’s poor. In doing so we have given a very strong commitment to stable and predictable aid finance.

The Government recognises the importance of providing predictable flows to partner countries. To this end DFID has published indicative forward country budgets in its Annual Report and details of approved projects in every country. It is important that Ministers continually review where, how and how much we spend, to ensure that aid is being used to maximum effect in reducing poverty in the national interest, and that our work responds to changing global challenges and volatile country situations.

25th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much funding her Department has provided to (a) the UNHCR and (b) other organisations to support Eritrean refugees in Ethiopia in each of the last three years.

Over the past three financial years DFID has disbursed £16,999,196 to UNHCR in Ethiopia (of which £7,010,225 was in 2013/14, £9,896,334 in 2014/15 and £91,637 in 2015/16).

From this total, £1,108,571 was allocated for child protection services for Eritrean refugees (£368,068 in 2013/14 and £740,503 in 2014/15).

A further £1,846,027 from this total was allocated over the three years in question for core relief items (basic household goods) for all refugees in Ethiopia, including Eritreans.

Funding for Eritrean refugees was not provided directly to any other organisation in Ethiopia.

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what proportion of her Department's budget was spent on supporting water, sanitation and hygiene services in each of the last five years.

Expenditure by sector is reported in Statistics on International Development (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-on-international-development-2014).


The table below shows the proportion of DFID bilateral aid spent on water, sanitation and hygiene for the last 5 years for which data are available.



2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

Water and Sanitation Expenditure (£ million)

106

112

142

130

163

Proportion of Total DFID Bilateral Programme

2.7%

2.6%

3.4%

3.1%

3.0%


When DFID or other UK government departments provide core contributions in support of multilateral organisations, we do not break down by sector. However, there are a number of multilateral organisations that are focussed on water and sanitation. Details of the contributions from DFID to each multilateral organisation can be found at Table A8, online at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-on-international-development-2014.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
10th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to his Department's policy paper, UK Airspace Policy: A framework for balanced decisions on the design and use of airspace, published in February 2017, what the timetable is for introducing the proposals in that paper; and what progress has been made on establishing an independent commission on civil aviation noise.

The government response to the consultation on UK Airspace Policy: A framework for balanced decisions on the design and use of airspace was published on 24 October 2017, together with a suite of related documents detailing the introduction of proposals. The response includes confirmation that an Independent Commission on Civil Aviation Noise will be established by Spring 2018.

13th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 7 January 2015 to Question 219323, how many hectares of land as mapped in the High Speed 2 Phase One environment statement have been allocated for (a) woodland, (b) wetland and (c) grass and habitat creation.

The number of hectares of land set aside for the various land uses are 522.7 for woodland, 45.7 for wetland and 410.5 for grass and habitat creation.

17th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of the land due to be compulsorily purchased for High Speed Two is required for (a) construction of the track and associated infrastructure and (b) environment mitigation.

It is not possible to answer the question as stated. HS2 is an integrated railway that has been designed to avoid and or reduce environmental impacts throughout its development. The approach used to developing this railway has been to fully integrate environmental mitigation into the railway’s design. For example, environmental impacts and mitigations are considered when designing the depth of a particular cutting.

It is therefore not possible to separate the usage of compulsorily purchased land into the two defined categories.

26th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the Government's latest projected cost is for the London to Birmingham stretch of High Speed 2, with contingency identified separately.

The current estimated cost of Phase 1 of High Speed 2 (London to West Midlands) is £15.65 billion. A contingency provision of £5.75 billion has been set at P95 level. Based on these prices the cost per single track kilometre is £47.56 million for Phase 1, including £80, 000 per kilometre for noise barriers. These figures are in 2011 prices and at the P95 level, meaning that at this early stage there is a 95 percent confidence level that the project can be delivered for this cost.

26th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the projected cost per kilometre is of the London to Birmingham stretch of High Speed 2; and what the projected cost per kilometre is of noise barriers on that stretch.

The current estimated cost of Phase 1 of High Speed 2 (London to West Midlands) is £15.65 billion. A contingency provision of £5.75 billion has been set at P95 level. Based on these prices the cost per single track kilometre is £47.56 million for Phase 1, including £80, 000 per kilometre for noise barriers. These figures are in 2011 prices and at the P95 level, meaning that at this early stage there is a 95 percent confidence level that the project can be delivered for this cost.

14th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that cataract removal surgery is available to everyone who would benefit from it.

Local clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), with their clinical expertise, are responsible for commissioning high-quality care to meet the needs of their populations. CCGs are required to carefully consider the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines in making commissioning decisions. These are available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng77

22nd Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what records his Department holds on the number of women who have been deterred from seeking NHS maternity care as a result of charging under the National Health Service (Charges to Overseas Visitors) Regulations 2015, as amended.

The Department does not hold data on the number of women who have been deterred from seeking National Health Service maternity care.

National guidance is clear that NHS maternity treatment should always be considered as immediately necessary and provided to all patients regardless of whether or not they are entitled to receive it free of charge or there are doubts about whether they could pay if subsequently found to be chargeable under the National Health Service (Charges to Overseas Visitors) Regulations 2015, as amended.

8th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he has had with NHS England on the availability of bisphosphonates for the prevention of secondary breast cancer.

We have had no such discussions with NHS England. Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for commissioning these drugs for the prevention of secondary breast cancer based upon clinical judgement.

11th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions the Chemotherapy Clinical Reference Group has had on the use of bisphosphonates for the indication of preventing secondary breast cancer since July 2015.

NHS England has advised that the Chemotherapy Clinical Reference Group (CRG) discussed the use of bisphosphonates for the indication of preventing secondary breast cancer during a meeting held in September 2015. It was raised in the context of guidance being developed by the Breast Cancer Clinical Reference Group and whether, through the Chemotherapy CRG, NHS England could implement any policy to support the use of these drugs. It was confirmed that these drugs would need to be commissioned by clinical commissioning groups.

26th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of hospitals in England that have at least one embedded specialist nurse dealing specifically with organ donation.

NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) has a network of specialist nurses for organ donation throughout the United Kingdom who are an integral part of the donation process and provide support to potential donor families.

All hospitals in England with donation potential have input and support from specialist nurses for organ donation. There are currently 98 hospitals in England that have specialist nurses for organ donation embedded within them. In addition NHSBT is recruiting specialist nurses to a further seven hospitals, making a total of 105. The level of support and resource allocated varies according to the donation potential for the individual hospital and the number of hospitals in each acute trust. The larger trusts will have a larger team allocated to them. The specialist nurses work to provide support to all hospitals within the trust, adopting a hub and spoke approach.

These specialist nurses provide an on call service 24 hours, seven days a week, to ensure each donor referral is responded to in a timely manner and facilitated.

2nd Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many (a) non-patient egg donors and (b) egg-share donors were admitted to hospital for ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in each year since 2009.

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has advised that licensed fertility clinics are only required to report instances of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) to the authority that require a hospital admission with a severe grading, although in practice clinics often report moderate OHSS as well. The HFEA does not, therefore, hold definitive data on the number of women admitted to hospital with OHSS, including non-patient egg donors and egg-share donors.

Information on the number of cases of OHSS reported to the HFEA, that were assessed as moderate or severe, was given in my Written Answer to the hon. Member for Heywood and Middleton (Jim Dobbin), on 24 June 2014 Official Report, columns 156-7W.

15th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the level of religious freedom in Kazakhstan; and what steps the Government is taking to promote and protect the right to freedom of religion or belief in that country.

Kazakhstan has a relatively tolerant environment and constitutionally does not single out or allow preference for any particular religion.

Groups such as the Ahmadiyya and Jehovah's Witnesses have experienced some problems with the Kazakh authorities over registration and taxation issues. A recent draft law on religious activity has imposed a further regulatory burden on religious organisations.

During my visit to Kazakhstan in August 2017 I encouraged respect for human rights, and publicly addressed a Kazakh audience on the importance of human rights and equality of all citizens.

3rd Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what progress his Department is making on supporting religious leaders to promote community cohesion and reconciliation through its Conflict, Security and Stability Fund; in which countries religious leaders are being supported by that fund; and which religious communities those leaders represent.

Through the Conflict Stability and Security Fund, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) delivers projects to help prevent violent extremism, promote human rights, and support community peace-building in Africa, the Middle East, South and Central Asia and Eastern Europe. This includes working with religious leaders as well as other stakeholders. Separately, through the FCO's Magna Carta Fund, we fund various projects to support community cohesion and freedom of religion or belief across the world. Examples include: supporting human rights defenders in South Asia, promoting legal and social protection of Freedom of Religion or Belief in secondary school curricula in the Middle East and North Africa, and support for de-radicalisation and the re-integration of young people in Nigeria who have been exposed to violent extremist groups. In October 2016, the FCO hosted a groundbreaking conference to consider how protecting Freedom of Religion or Belief can help to combat violent extremism by building more inclusive societies. A range of faith leaders were invited to attend this event.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
17th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to Scorched Earth, Poisoned Air, published by Amnesty International on 29 September 2016, if he will comment on the alleged destruction of 170 villages in the Jebel Marra region of Darfur by the Sudanese armed forces since January 2016.

​We are very concerned by the alleged destruction of villages as well as the other allegations of human rights and International Humanitarian Law violations in Jebel Marra. We are deeply troubled about the humanitarian situation in Darfur, which was made more acute by a renewed outbreak of hostilities in January and which has displaced at least 80,000 civilians; adding to the 2.6 million people long term displaced in Darfur. We continue to believe that urgent humanitarian access and a lasting cessation of hostilities leading to a permanent ceasefire are crucial to ending the conflict in Darfur and have made this point directly to the Government of Sudan, most recently during high–level discussions on 10-11 October.

17th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will direct the UK's representatives at the UN to call for an investigation of the alleged use of chemical weapons by the Sudanese armed forces in the Jebel Marra region of Darfur.

​We are very concerned by the allegations of chemical weapons use in Sudan and have raised our concern during UN Security Council consultations and directly with the Government of Sudan. We are aware that the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is looking into the allegations and has asked the Government of Sudan to share all relevant information. The UK condemns any use of chemical weapons, by anyone anywhere.

21st Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, when he last raised the detention in Indonesia of Rebecca Prosser; and with whom he raised that issue.

In consultation with Ms Prosser’s legal team and advisors, the case has been raised at senior level on ten separate occasions. I personally raised it with the Indonesian Foreign Minister in September at the UN General Assembly and it was last raised on 9 October by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s Director General Economic & Consular with the Indonesian Director General of Protocol and Consular Affairs. We plan to raise the case again on 29 October during a meeting in London with the representatives of the Indonesian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

21st Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, on what occasions British consular officials in Indonesia have visited Rebecca Prosser since her detention on 28 May 2015; how long each such visit lasted; and when the next such visit will take place.

Members of the consular team in Jakarta have visited Rebecca Prosser twice. The first visit took place on 2 June, shortly after her arrest, and lasted 30 minutes. The second, which lasted over two hours, took place on 10 September when she was moved from house arrest into a detention facility. Normal practice is to visit detainees in Indonesia every three months.

Consular staff are in regular contact with Ms Prosser’s employer’s representatives, her legal team and her family. Since court proceedings began, we have provided a weekly written update to Ms Prosser, her family and their MPs. Our most recent contact with Ms Prosser’s family was on 21 October.

21st Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, at which court hearings in Indonesia for Rebecca Prosser, Consular officials in his Department attended.

It is not our general policy to send consular officials, who are not legally trained, to attend court hearings. Consular officials have not therefore attended the court hearings. Consular staff remain in regular contact with Ms Prosser’s employer’s representatives, her legal team and her family.

3rd Apr 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what progress HMRC has made on its moving its inland pre-clearance operations to new purpose-equipped sites at Hayes and Milton Keynes; and what contingency measures HMRC has implemented to mitigate delays as a result of that move.

HMRC’s new Inland Pre-Clearance sites are now operational. The move resulted in a temporary backlog of consignments for examination. HMRC has triaged consignments using a principled risk-based approach, releasing some consignments without prejudice to any further compliance action, and has also examined other consignments at the port. HMRC is now moving remaining containers from the ports for examination.

1st Jul 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph 2.259 of Budget 2015, HC 1093, which Department has been allocated as lead Department for the implementation of a marine reserve around the Pitcairn Islands.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office is leading on the implementation of a Marine Protected Area around the Pitcairn Islands.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether during the private beta testing phase two of the EU Settlement Scheme his Department instructed local authorities to support eligible non-UK EU children in care to secure British citizenship.

During the second Private Beta phase of the EU Settlement Scheme, participating local authorities were not instructed to support eligible EU national children in care to secure British citizenship.

Local authorities participated on a voluntary basis to apply on behalf of some children in their care. Only looked after EU national children (within the meaning of section 22(1) of the Children Act 1989) were eligible to participate in this phase of the scheme.
The Private Beta phase did not involve applications for British citizenship, which is a separate process.

18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many non-UK EU children are residing in the five local authorities selected by his Department for the private beta testing phase two of the EU Settlement Scheme in (a) total and (b) in each local authority pilot site area.

The Home Office does not hold data on how many EU National children reside in the five local authorities which participated in the second Private Beta test phase of the EU Settlement Scheme.

18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of (a) the number of non-UK EU children in care and (b) the number of those children in each local authority that were part of his Department's private beta phase two testing pilot by (i) age and (ii) EU nationality.

The precise number of non-UK EU children in care is not known. Local authorities do not routinely collect this data. The Home Office has estimated that there are approximately 5,000 EU children in care in the UK, not including care leavers. This estimate is based on ONS data on the proportion of EEA citizens per Local Authority and government data on volumes of children in care per Local Authority

The second Private Beta phase included some applications for Looked After Children made by five local authorities. The local authorities which participated did so voluntarily for some of the EU children in their care. In total 19 applications were made on behalf of looked after children by these local authorities. Applicants were aged between 5-17 and comprised 6 different nationalities.

18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number of non-UK EU children in care who could not take part in his Department's private beta phase test pilot (a) in total and (b) in each local authority pilot site because they did not have a passport.

According to the rules laid before parliament (on 11/10/2018) for the second Private Beta phase of the EU Settlement Scheme, only a child being looked after (within the meaning of section 22(1) of the Children Act 1989) by one of the five named local authorities, with a chipped passport, was eligible to apply.

The Home Office did not estimate the number of children who could not take part in the Private Beta phase because they did not have a passport.

All EU applicants, including looked after children, will be able to apply with an ID card or a passport once the scheme is rolled out fully from 30 March 2019. In addition, from that date it will be possible for applicants to submit alternative evidence of their identity and nationality where they are unable to provide a passport or national identity card due to circumstances outside of their control, or for compelling practical or compassionate reasons.

18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many non-UK EU children in care took part in the Home Office's private beta testing phase two of the EU Settlement Scheme (a) in total and (b) in each local authority area; how many (i) received settled status, (ii) received pre-settled status, (iii) were refused, (iv) requested an administrative review (A) in total and (B) in each local authority area.

In total 19 applications were made on behalf of looked after children by the participating local authorities. We are unable to provide a breakdown by local authority as this may identify some of the children involved.

16 have received settled status.

0 have received pre-settled status

0 have been refused

0 have requested an administrative review

We are working with the relevant local authorities to gather further evidence for the 3 outstanding cases.

14th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish the findings of the follow-up audit of reports made under Rule 35 of the Detention Centre Rules 2001.

Stephen Shaw CBE, the former Prisons and Probation Ombudsman for England and Wales, has completed the review into the welfare of vulnerable immigration detainees which the Home Secretary asked him to conduct, and has recently submitted his report to Ministers at the Home Office and Department of Health. His findings are being carefully considered. The report will be published by laying it before Parliament, alongside the Government’s response to the recommendations. The Government intends to publish the Rule 35 audit alongside publication of Stephen Shaw’s report.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many authorised pitches each local authority in the West Midlands has been granted.

The Department collects official statistics on the count of Traveller caravans in England. Data is collected from local authorities on a bi-annual basis to reflect winter residence and summer travelling trends. All datasets and publications can be found online on our statistical series page here - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/traveller-caravan-count.

The Traveller caravan count covers data on the number of caravans and traveller sites in England; it does not cover the number of occupants residing in these caravans, or caravan sites or the potential drivers for any observed change. In addition, the count does not capture the total number of pitches in each local authority, only those which are occupied at the time of each count.

Kit Malthouse
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
3rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps he will take to monitor the loss to development of land in England and Wales during the UN International Year of Soils in 2015.

The Department for Communities and Local Government has previously published national statistics on Land Use Change. These statistics report the amount of undeveloped land, including agricultural land, changing to a developed use changing to a developed use.

In 2013, the Department let a tender to secure these statistics and a 30 per cent reduction in costs using an innovative new methodology. The first publication of these new statistics will cover the year 2013-14 and has been provisionally announced for June/July 2015. Subsequent years publications will be preannounced for publication in due course.