Danny Kruger Portrait

Danny Kruger

Conservative - Devizes

First elected: 12th December 2019


Co-operatives, Mutuals and Friendly Societies Bill
23rd Nov 2022 - 30th Nov 2022
Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill
15th Jun 2022 - 11th Jul 2022
British Sign Language Bill
9th Feb 2022 - 23rd Feb 2022
Elections Bill
22nd Sep 2021 - 26th Oct 2021


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Danny Kruger has voted in 956 divisions, and 13 times against the majority of their Party.

24 Jun 2020 - Demonstrations (Abortion Clinics) - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 43 Conservative No votes vs 56 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 47
8 Jun 2020 - Divorce, Dissolution and Separation Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative No votes vs 207 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 231 Noes - 16
27 Apr 2021 - Delegated Legislation - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Conservative No votes vs 222 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 89
22 Jun 2022 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 61 Conservative No votes vs 106 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 70
7 Dec 2022 - Financial Services and Markets Bill - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted No - against a party majority - in line with the party majority and in line with the House
One of 269 Conservative No votes vs 5 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 206 Noes - 271
22 Mar 2023 - Northern Ireland - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative No votes vs 281 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 515 Noes - 29
28 Jun 2023 - Education - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 20 Conservative No votes vs 237 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 373 Noes - 28
18 Jul 2023 - Business without Debate - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted No - against a party majority - in line with the party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative No votes vs 251 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 402 Noes - 21
13 Dec 2023 - Retained EU Law Reform - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Conservative No votes vs 288 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 464 Noes - 11
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 57 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 58 Noes - 525
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 58 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 68 Noes - 529
17 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 315 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 276
17 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Danny Kruger voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 59 Conservative Aye votes vs 266 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 536
View All Danny Kruger Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
(17 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(12 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Independent)
(10 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(40 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(29 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(24 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Agriculture Act 2020
(6,347 words contributed)
Illegal Migration Act 2023
(2,675 words contributed)
Procurement Act 2023
(1,738 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Danny Kruger's debates

Devizes Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the Government to abandon the planned implementation of affordability checks for some people who want to place a bet. We believe such checks – which could include assessing whether people are ‘at risk of harm' based on their postcode or job title – are inappropriate and discriminatory.

We are concerned that Parliament has not discussed and will not have a say on the 307 proposed amendments to the International Health Regulations, AND the amendments to 5 Articles of the IHR that were ADOPTED by the 75th World Health Assembly on 27 May 2022.

We want the Government to commit to not signing any international treaty on pandemic prevention and preparedness established by the World Health Organization (WHO), unless this is approved through a public referendum.

There has been a significant increase in heart attacks and related health issues since the rollout of the Covid-19 vaccines began in 2021. This needs immediate and full scientific investigation to establish if there is any possible link with the Covid-19 vaccination rollout.

The Government should bring forward legislation to allow assisted dying for adults who are terminally ill and have mental capacity. It should be permitted subject to strict upfront safeguards, assessed by two doctors independently, and self-administered by the dying person.


Latest EDMs signed by Danny Kruger

26th March 2024
Danny Kruger signed this EDM on Wednesday 17th April 2024

Referral of matters of 21 February 2024 to the Committee of Privileges

Tabled by: William Wragg (Independent - Hazel Grove)
That this House notes the Speaker’s decision on selection and calling of amendments on 21 February 2024 was not in accordance with the established precedent for Opposition days; and accordingly considers that, notwithstanding the Resolution of this House of 6 February 1978, the matter of whether undue pressure was placed …
70 signatures
(Most recent: 17 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 42
Conservative: 24
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 1
21st March 2024
Danny Kruger signed this EDM on Monday 15th April 2024

Town and Country Planning

Tabled by: Edward Leigh (Conservative - Gainsborough)
That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, praying that the Town and Country Planning (Former RAF Scampton) (Accommodation for Asylum-Seekers etc.) Special Development Order 2024 (S.I., 2024, No. 412), dated 20 March 2024, a copy of which was laid before this House on 21 March 2024, be annulled.
22 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 22
View All Danny Kruger's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Danny Kruger, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Danny Kruger has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Danny Kruger

Danny Kruger has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


Latest 32 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason the Government has decided not to implement a carbon fee dividends scheme.

A carbon fee and dividend is an alternative form of carbon pricing policy. The UK already prices carbon through, for example, our participation in the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS).

UK Government is establishing a UK Emissions Trading System, with increased ambition on carbon pricing. The new system will ensure a smooth transition for businesses as the UK is set to leave EU system after the Transition Period at the end of the year, while also allowing us to have autonomy over its design and governance. Further detail can be found in The UK Government’s and Devolved Administrations’ full response to the public Consultation on the Future of UK carbon pricing, published on 1 June.

6th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will take steps with Ofcom to undertake a review of the adequacy of guidance to the media on the reporting of (a) assisted suicide, (b) euthanasia and (c) other suicide cases.

Guidance on how broadcasters report assisted suicide, euthanasia and other suicide cases is a matter for Ofcom as the UK’s independent broadcasting regulator. Ofcom are required by law to keep the Broadcasting Code and any accompanying guidance under review.

In the UK, there is an independent self-regulatory regime for the press. The Government does not intervene in what the press can and cannot publish or oversee the work of press regulators.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish a timetable for (a) implementing the expanded dormant assets scheme and (b) funding for good causes derived from the new classes of dormant assets becoming available.

The Dormant Assets Scheme is led by industry and backed by the government with the aim of reuniting people with their financial assets. Where this is not possible, this money supports important social and environmental initiatives across the UK.

As a voluntary Scheme, industry stakeholders have been at the forefront of efforts to bring assets from the insurance and pensions, investment and wealth management, and securities sectors into scope. This includes leading work to estimate the value of dormancy currently in each sector and using their experience and understanding of reunification processes to inform their estimates of how much could be reunited with their owners successfully. The following table sets out these estimates, broken down by sector:

Sector

Dormant assets

Could be reunited with owners

Insurance and pensions

£2.1bn

£1.17bn

Investment and wealth management

£1.4bn

£781m

Securities

£158m

£48m

TOTAL

£3.7bn

£2bn

Scheme expansion requires primary legislation, which will be introduced when parliamentary time allows. Once legislation has achieved Royal Assent, the speed at which it can be implemented and new funds will become available is dependent on regulator and industry readiness, as well as their voluntary participation in the Scheme. We anticipate that the estimated £880 million to be unlocked through the expansion of the Scheme will take several years to be released, based on the rate that industry participants transfer new assets.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to page 25 of the Government's response to the consultation on expanding the Dormant Asset Scheme, if he will publish the methodology used to calculate that 54 per cent of dormant assets in the (a) insurance and pensions, (b) investment and wealth management and (c) securities sectors could be reclaimed by their owners as a result of enhanced tracing, verification and reunification efforts.

The Dormant Assets Scheme is led by industry and backed by the government with the aim of reuniting people with their financial assets. Where this is not possible, this money supports important social and environmental initiatives across the UK.

As a voluntary Scheme, industry stakeholders have been at the forefront of efforts to bring assets from the insurance and pensions, investment and wealth management, and securities sectors into scope. This includes leading work to estimate the value of dormancy currently in each sector and using their experience and understanding of reunification processes to inform their estimates of how much could be reunited with their owners successfully. The following table sets out these estimates, broken down by sector:

Sector

Dormant assets

Could be reunited with owners

Insurance and pensions

£2.1bn

£1.17bn

Investment and wealth management

£1.4bn

£781m

Securities

£158m

£48m

TOTAL

£3.7bn

£2bn

Scheme expansion requires primary legislation, which will be introduced when parliamentary time allows. Once legislation has achieved Royal Assent, the speed at which it can be implemented and new funds will become available is dependent on regulator and industry readiness, as well as their voluntary participation in the Scheme. We anticipate that the estimated £880 million to be unlocked through the expansion of the Scheme will take several years to be released, based on the rate that industry participants transfer new assets.

7th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of septic tanks on the cleanliness of rivers; and if he will make it his policy to ban septic tanks (a) in the catchment areas of chalk streams and (b) near other watercourses.

Large numbers of properties in rural areas of England rely on on-site water treatment systems as they are not connected to mains sewerage systems. Septic tanks, the most common on-site sewage treatment systems in these areas, are regulated to ensure they are maintained properly and do not cause pollution. Through our long-term Plan for Water, the Government is committed to delivering a clean water environment for people and nature, including the impact of private sewerage systems on chalk streams. This aligns with our broader commitment to review private sewage discharges regulation to manage environmental risk.

Robbie Moore
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, further to the Answer of 27 March 2023 to Question 170767, what plans he has to make available financial support for increasing public access to the countryside under Environmental Land Management schemes.

We are making further changes to our Environmental Land Management schemes in 2024 to increase support for farmers and foresters to put new permissive access in place. This gives more choice about how farmers and foresters provide access across their land and will help more people safely access the countryside. The new permissive access actions we are introducing are as follows:

Action:

Duration

Payment Rate

Summary Description

Open Access

5 years

£92 per hectare

Provide and maintain permissive open access to the public on areas of land

Footpath Access

5 years

£77 per 100m

Provide and maintain new permissive footpaths to the public

Bridleways and cycle path access

5 years

£158 per 100m

Provide and maintain new permissive bridleways and cycle paths

Access for people with reduced mobility

5 years

£221 per 100m

Provide and maintain new permissive access for people with reduced mobility

Upgrading Countryside and Rights of Way for cyclists and horse riders

5 years

£158 per 100m

Provide and maintain access alongside existing rights of way for cyclists and horse riders

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 27 June 2023 to Question 190527 on Deposit Return Schemes: Glass, how many representations her Department received from businesses against the inclusion of glass in the deposit return scheme for England and Northern Ireland; and from whom.

Businesses have been clear that adding glass to a deposit return scheme will add fundamental complexity for our pubs and restaurants, increase burdens on small businesses, whilst creating greater inconvenience for consumers.

Among other considerations, the UK Government took into account strong representations made by relevant businesses, including distillers and the hospitality sector.

Concerns raised included:

  • Handling costs and equipment complexity. Reverse Vending Machines (RVMs) will need to be emptied more frequently and will carry additional safety risks associated with handling broken glass in retail environments.
  • For retailers offering a manual take-back service, glass bottles will require more space to be stored safely which could disproportionately impact on small retailers.
  • In addition, points were raised regarding, the weight of glass and the potential for breakages also posing increased inconvenience for consumers.

More broadly, the additional cost and complexity imposed on the scheme if glass were to be included.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department is taking steps to (a) support and (b) require landowners to (i) undertake repairs to (A) footpaths, (B) stiles, (C) gates and (D) other rights of way and (ii) improve public access to the countryside under Environmental Land Management schemes.

The Government supports the health and wellbeing benefits that access to the countryside can bring, including improving physical and mental health and supporting local communities and economies.

Landowners have a statutory duty to keep public rights of way in good working order and therefore this is not covered by Environmental Land Management Schemes, unless they choose to upgrade to provide additional access, e.g. from a stile to a gate via under Countryside Stewardship (option AC1).

Under Countryside Stewardship, we currently pay for the following actions to help improve public access to the countryside:

  • Farmers hosting tours of their farms for school pupils and care farming visitors (ED1)
  • Providing access maps and signage, and preparing sites for access by providing toilet facilities, shelters, new footpaths, bridges and gates, with the objective of greater public accessibility of the countryside (AC1)
  • Accreditation for staff carrying out countryside educational access visits (AC2)
  • A supplement to enable permissive access across woodland, where access is currently limited (WS4)

Public access is also supported by our Landscape Recovery scheme, with projects being assessed for the benefits they will deliver for a wide range of objectives. Under the England Woodland Creation Offer, higher payments are available if woodland is located close to settlements within the 40% most deprived areas in England, or if it will provide new long-term permissive access for recreation.

Additionally, through our Farming in Protected Landscapes programme, we provide funding to support and improve Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and National Parks. We pay for projects providing opportunities for people to discover, enjoy and understand the landscape and its cultural heritage, including permissive access.

We do want to offer further support for access to our countryside, and so under our Environmental Land Management Schemes we are also now exploring how we can pay for:

  • New permissive access
  • Managing existing access pressures on land and water
  • Expanding educational access beyond groups of school pupils and care farming visitors
Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his planned timetable is for publication of the M4 to Dorset Coast Connectivity Study.

The M4 to Dorset Coast Study has been considering how to improve north-south strategic road connectivity between the M4 corridor and the Dorset Coast.

The findings of this study will be reflected in the final RIS3 document when published later in 2024. Rather than a standalone report, National Highways will be in contact to discuss its outcomes with you.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an estimate of the (a) (i) previous, (ii) future and (iii) total costs for the construction of the A303 Stonehenge road scheme between Amesbury and Berwick Down and (b) annual maintenance costs over the next 60 years in present day values; and whether contractual penalties exist if the scheme is (A) cancelled and (B) subject to serious construction delays.

Construction costs

In 2017, when the Outline Business Case was approved, the construction costs estimate range for the project was between £1.1bn to £2.5bn, with a central estimate of £1.6bn. This was predicated on starting construction work in 2021 and the project being delivered under the government’s Private Finance 2 model (PF2).

In 2018, the estimate was updated following the cancellation of PF2. The revisedcost estimate ranged between £1.5bn to £2.8bn, with a central estimate of £1.9bn. This was predicated on a start of works in 2021 and public funding.

Maintenance costs

Based on 2019 prices, National Highways will need to make provision for operations, maintenance and renewals costs of approximately £8m per annum (plus inflation) over a 60-year operating period.

Contractual Penalties

There are no contractual penalties if the project is cancelled or delayed, but National Highways would need to agree compensation events relating to the costs of delay and inflation.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will make an estimate of (a) the take-up, as a proportion of eligibility, of the Specified Adult Childcare Credit, and (b) the estimated expenditure for the Specified Adult Childcare Credit, in each of the last four years.

Qualifying Years of National Insurance for State Pension can be filled whilst working or being self-employed; by being credited with National Insurance credits; and through making voluntary National Insurance contributions.

Specified Adult Childcare Credits are one of the many ways an individual can build a Qualifying Year of National Insurance to protect their future entitlement to State Pension. It is a transfer of the National Insurance credit from the primary parent/carer receiving Child Benefit to a Specified Adult providing care. Its award depends on the circumstances between an individual parent and a carer, and it is not possible to estimate potential volumes


There is no immediate expenditure associated with the award of the credit. Each credit adds a qualifying year which is used when the individual reaches State Pension age to determine their overall State Pension entitlement.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will publish (a) a list of all organisations that have been awarded funding under the Kickstart scheme and (b) details of the number of placements each organisation has created since the start of that scheme.

As of 20/11/2020, the DWP’s Kickstart scheme has received 4’783 total applications. So far, applications covering 23’934 vacancies have been approved. Once approved, employers and organisations are sent a grant agreement of terms and conditions for Kickstart funding.

Below is a list of organisations who have been approved for funding from the DWP’s Kickstart scheme and that have returned their grant funding agreements as of 23/11/2020.

Company Name

Number of Vacancies

Hales Group Limited

39

MOLINARE TV & FILM LIMITED

37

Park Homes (UK) Ltd

30

Black Sheep Utilities Ltd

30

iSmash UK Trading Ltd

56

Airfi Networks Services Limited

30

Blueline Learning Ltd

30

Intelligent Transformation Limited

30

Lionheart Security Services LTD

30

Modo Creations Limited

30

RGE Engineering Ltd.

32

Purpol Marketing Ltd

50

Specialist Care Team Ltd

33

The Boxing House Ltd.

30

MYBE Awards

30

Aspen Health

30

Boundary Mill Stores Limited

71

Compass Group PLC

50

Cordant Recruitment

65

David Lloyd Leisure

130

DealBerry Limited

40

Enginsoft

40

Event Support Team ltd

100

EXPD8 LIMITED

305

Macc Care

90

O'Neill and Brennan Construction Ltd

500

Rising Stars Property Solutions

100

Robinson Manufacturing Limited

35

Tenstar Personnel Limited

150

The HALO Kilmarnock Ltd

200

TRG LOGISTICS LTD

75

Yorkshire College of Beauty Ltd

32

AA Zentivus Ltd

30

AIR RESOURCES LIMITED

30

Angel Guard Limited

30

Bauer Radio Limited

30

Crouch Logistics Ltd

30

F M CONWAY LIMITED

30

Link Academy Trust

30

Hollowood Chemists Limited

30

MARCUS EVANS LIMITED

30

MPS Care Ltd

30

Nightingale Group Limited

100

Reed Specialist Recruitment Ltd

50

The Claxson Group Limited

30

Hometrust Care Ltd

30

Maritime Academy Trust

30

The Trade Centre Group PLC

30

Whistl UK Ltd.

30

Yorkshire Repak Limited

30

CAPITA PLC

60

LADbible Group

30

Q Care Ltd

40

University of Wolverhampton Multi Academy Trust

40

Berneslai Homes Ltd

30

Corona corporate Solutions Ltd

30

NDH CARE LTD

34

Peninsula Care Homes ltd

30

Reynold 123 Limited

34

Search Consultancy Limited

30

The Calico Group

30

Williams & Co

40

Bolloré Logistics UK Ltd

30

Internet Fusion Ltd

45

Learning Curve Group Limited

30

Pilgrim's Pride UK Ltd

60

The Northam Care Trust

30

Heritage Taverns Ltd

30

Oliver Marketing Limited

30

Wincanton Holdings Ltd

120

Places For People Group Limited

41

The Gym Limited

30

Portakabin Limited

30

Unity Schools Partnership

65

Astute Ltd

31

Made To Order Limited

30

E-ACT

66

M&D Green Dispensing Chemist Limited

30

Aspire Defence Services Ltd

69

Suffolk's Libraries IPS Limited

30

Treloar Trust

30

Ronnies Limited

35

Vantec Europe Ltd

30

Tops Day Nursery Limited

37

Coppergreen Developments Ltd

41

Coffee1 Ltd

30

Moorhouse Group

30

Action Centres UK Ltd

30

SPECTRUM HEALTHCARE DOMICILIARY CARE LIMITED

30

Optima Care

30

Clipper Logistics PLC

105

Pre-school Learning Alliance

50

Peter Vardy Ltd

58

Rosebourne Limited

30

West Midlands Ambulance Service University NHS Foundation Trust

30

Shireland Collegiate Academy Trust

44

The Royal Mint

32

Osbourne Co-operative Academy Trust

30

Coate WATER Cre Company Ltd

80

J Murphy & Sons Ltd

52

Persona Care and Support Limited

30

Doncaster Culture & Leisure Trust

30

London North Eastern Railway Limited

38

Harris Federation

60

Aggregate Industries

39

Impact Education Multi Academy Trust

35

The Growth Company

31

Go Train Ltd

30

Furniture Resource Centre Limited

30

Key Care & Support

30

Saint John of God Hospitaller Services

30

MLL Telecom Limited

36

Brunelcare

42

Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

30

The Football League (Community) Ltd T/A EFL Trust

475

Muslim Council of Britain Charitable Foundation

90

HIT Training Ltd

48

One for the people limited

30

Casual Speakers Ltd

38

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jun 2020
What steps her Department is taking to promote opportunities for young people as the economy reopens as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Jobcentres are already engaging now with new and existing claimants. Young people are at the heart of what we are developing, and we are listening to their experiences and ideas.

The department will continue to work with stakeholders, as we value their expertise, to make sure as the economy continues to opens up further young people have all the tools they need to thrive. We recently met with key stakeholders of the new Youth Employment Group, which includes Impetus, Prince’s Trust, Youth Employment UK, the Institute for Employment Studies and the Youth Futures Foundation to discuss and co-produce solutions for young people in this recovery.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will make an assessment of the implications for her policies of findings from (a) the report by the Anscombe Institute entitled Suicide prevention: does legalising assisted suicide make things better or worse?, published on 21 April 2022, and (b) other suicide prevention organisations.

It remains the Department’s view that any change to the law in this sensitive area is a matter for Parliament to decide, and an issue of conscience for individual parliamentarians rather than one for Government policy. The Department as no such plans to make any formal assessment.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
12th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will make an assessment of the potential impact of legalising assisted dying on suicide prevention programmes.

It remains the Department’s view that any change to the law in this sensitive area is a matter for Parliament to decide, and an issue of conscience for individual parliamentarians rather than one for Government policy. The Department as no such plans to make any formal assessment.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
6th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will issue guidance to her Department on using the term (a) assisted suicide when referring to procedures that involve ingesting poison prescribed by a doctor with the intent to die and (b) euthanasia when referring to the delivery of a lethal injection by a doctor.

There are currently no plans to issue guidance on using the terms assisted suicide, when referring to procedures that involve ingesting poison prescribed by a doctor with the intent to die, and euthanasia, when referring to the delivery of a lethal injection by a doctor.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
6th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether she has made an assessment of the impact of legalising assisted suicide on palliative care.

No assessment has been made of the impact of legalising assisted suicide on palliative care. The Government recognises that access to high-quality, personalised palliative and end of life care can make a significant difference to individuals and their families, at a sensitive time.

While the National Health Service has always been required to commission appropriate palliative and end of life care services to meet the reasonable needs of their population, as part of the Health and Care Act 2022, palliative care services were added to the list of services an integrated care board must commission, promoting a more consistent national approach and supporting commissioners in prioritising palliative and end of life care.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason children who turned five before 1 September 2022 remain eligible for a primary course covid-19 vaccination, in the context of the risk of severe covid-19 symptoms in this age group.

The Government continues to be guided by the independent Joint Committee on Vaccinations and Immunisations (JCVI) on who should be offered COVID-19 vaccinations.

The primary aim of the universal primary vaccination offers to children aged five to 11 years old, was to increase the immunity of vaccinated individuals against severe COVID-19 in advance of a potential future wave during the pandemic. When formulating advice in relation to childhood immunisations, JCVI has consistently maintained that the focus should be on the potential benefits and harms of vaccination to children and young people themselves, with prevention of severe COVID-19 (hospitalisations and deaths) in children and young people the primary aim.

As we transition away from a pandemic emergency response towards pandemic recovery, the JCVI advised on 25 January 2023, that the offer of a primary (initial) course of COVID-19 vaccination should be removed from those aged five to 49 years old who are not in an at-risk group. This will move to a more targeted offer during seasonal campaign periods to those at higher risk of serious outcomes from COVID-19 or of transmitting the virus to those vulnerable to serious outcomes. The JCVI advice to target the initial vaccination offer to those at higher risk only is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-vaccination-programme-for-2023-jcvi-interim-advice-8-november-2022/jcvi-statement-on-the-covid-19-vaccination-programme-for-2023-8-november-2022

The Government is considering when during 2023 this recommendation should be implemented, and an announcement will be made in due course.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an estimate of the (a) vaccine, (b) resourcing, (c) other direct, (d) marketing and promotional and (e) other indirect costs of vaccinating children under the age of 18 for covid-19 in 2023.

NHS England manages the costs of the COVID-19 vaccine programme across each campaign, rather than on a vaccine-by-vaccine basis. This funding covers the direct cost of vaccinating as well as additional central programme costs. No marketing has been specifically directed at vaccinating under 18s in 2023 to protect against COVID-19. Other indirect costs are not specific to vaccinating under 18s; they are for the wider vaccination programme and support vaccinating under 18s only where relevant. The price that the Government has paid for any COVID-19 vaccine is commercially sensitive. Disclosure would breach the Government’s confidentiality obligations.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an estimate of the costs of (a) unnecessary prescribing or prescribing beyond medical guidance and (b) the consultation that accompanies that prescribing in respect of (i) antidepressants, (ii) opioids, (iii) benzodiazepines, (iv) z-drugs and (v) abapentinoids in each of the last five years.

We have no plans to do so.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the recommendations of the 2019 PHE Prescribed Medicines Review, when he plans to introduce a dedicated national helpline and website to support people with prescribed drug dependence.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are leading a programme of work in response to the recommendations in Public Health England’s ‘Dependence and withdrawal associated with some prescribed medicines: An evidence review’. The recommendation for a time-limited dedicated national helpline and website is being carefully considered as part of this work.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 25 April to Question 181066 on Cryptocurrencies, if he will provide a timeframe for when the Government will (a) conduct and (b) publish an assessment of the impact of a central bank digital currency on the commercial banking sector.

In February 2023, HM Treasury and the Bank of England published a joint consultation on a UK central bank digital currency (CBDC).

A response to this consultation will be issued in due course following the close of the consultation on 30 June 2023.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 25 April to Question 181066 on Cryptocurrencies, whether he plans to publish a response to the consultation on the digital pound.

In February 2023, HM Treasury and the Bank of England published a joint consultation on a UK central bank digital currency (CBDC).

A response to this consultation will be issued in due course following the close of the consultation on 30 June 2023.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
17th Apr 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential impact of the introduction of a central bank digital currency on retail funding for commercial banks.

In February 2023, HM Treasury and the Bank of England published a joint consultation on a UK central bank digital currency (CBDC). The consultation noted that a UK CBDC, or ‘digital pound’, is likely to be needed in the future. However, a final decision has not yet been made and will be informed by this consultation and future work.

As part of this consultation period, HM Treasury and the Bank of England will carefully consider how the digital pound could impact the commercial banking sector, as well as any potential deposit outflows and any substantial shift in retail banks’ funding models.

A response to this consultation will be issued in due course.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
17th Apr 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential impact of the introduction of a central bank digital currency on deposit outflows for commercial banks.

In February 2023, HM Treasury and the Bank of England published a joint consultation on a UK central bank digital currency (CBDC). The consultation noted that a UK CBDC, or ‘digital pound’, is likely to be needed in the future. However, a final decision has not yet been made and will be informed by this consultation and future work.

As part of this consultation period, HM Treasury and the Bank of England will carefully consider how the digital pound could impact the commercial banking sector, as well as any potential deposit outflows and any substantial shift in retail banks’ funding models.

A response to this consultation will be issued in due course.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
17th Apr 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential impact of the introduction of a central bank digital currency on the commercial banking sector.

In February 2023, HM Treasury and the Bank of England published a joint consultation on a UK central bank digital currency (CBDC). The consultation noted that a UK CBDC, or ‘digital pound’, is likely to be needed in the future. However, a final decision has not yet been made and will be informed by this consultation and future work.

As part of this consultation period, HM Treasury and the Bank of England will carefully consider how the digital pound could impact the commercial banking sector, as well as any potential deposit outflows and any substantial shift in retail banks’ funding models.

A response to this consultation will be issued in due course.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
13th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of Ukrainian defence against Russian aggression.

Ukraine has inflicted heavy losses on Russian forces. We estimate that around 175,000 Russian military personnel have been injured or killed in the conflict. Despite Russian forces carrying out offensive operations across the front line in recent weeks, any Russian gains have been incremental and costly, and Ukraine’s defence has eroded the combat effectiveness of Russian forces.

25th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what information his Department holds on what use local authorities have made of the £10,500 per-person funding provided under the Homes for Ukraine Scheme; and whether his Department provided guidance to local authorities on how that funding should be spent.

Information and guidance on grant funding allocations for local authorities under the Homes for Ukraine scheme can be accessed here and here . DLUHC officials are in constant contact with counterparts in local authorities, and there are many examples of good practice and innovation by local authorities. Some have chosen to ‘top up’ the ‘thank you’ payments for hosts, others have extensive programmes to help arrivals into the private rented sector or employment. Inevitably, different locations will have differing specific needs, and have had particular successes or challenges.

Felicity Buchan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what support his Department provides to community-led housing groups.

The principal way in which the Government has supported the community-led housebuilding sector in England in recent years was through the Community Housing Fund, making available £163 million in grants over 2018/19 and 2019/20. The Community Housing Fund closed at the end of March. Departmental budgets for 2021/22 have been confirmed at the recent Comprehensive Spending Review and my department will now undertake a process of allocation of budgets to individual programmes. The needs of the community-led housing sector will be taken into consideration alongside the full range of the department’s priorities.

The Government recognises that the community-led housing sector offers significant potential for helping to meet housing need across England. In addition to helping increase the rate of delivery of new housing, it will help deliver a range of benefits including diversifying the housebuilding sector, improving design and construction quality, and sustaining local communities and local economies. The support and close involvement of the local community enables the community-led approach to secure planning permission and deliver housing that could not be brought forward through mainstream development.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that a certificate provider for a Lasting Power of Attorney application is aware their role is to ensure the donor understands the information relevant to the decision, can retain that information, and use or weigh up that information as part of the process of making the decision.

The certificate provider is a crucial safeguard during the creation of a lasting power of attorney (LPA). They sign to state that the person making the LPA understands it, is not being pressured into making it and there is no evidence of fraud. A modernised LPA service must provide additional support to certificate providers, so they are confident and mindful of their role, including the part the functional test (understanding, retaining, weighing and communicating information relevant to the decisions made) plays in carrying out that role.

My department is therefore considering the best way to achieve this, including potential changes to the certificate that is signed, the forms more generally and supporting guidance. Testing and iterating any changes with stakeholders and users will be critical to ensure we achieve the core aim that the certificate provider understands what they need to do and has confidence taking on the role.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when the replacement programme for the suspended Domestic Abuse Perpetrator Programme in June 2022 will be implemented; and whether his Department has made an assessment of the likelihood that perpetrators of domestic abuse who have not joined a new programme are still able to have regular contact with their victims before course completion.

The Government is actively considering options to address the current lack of Domestic Abuse Perpetrator Programmes in the family court. We are working with providers and the domestic abuse sector to explore interim arrangements, including potential new referral mechanisms, ahead of developing a revised model of support for domestic abuse cases in the family court.

The welfare of the child is the paramount consideration in any decision made by the court regarding child arrangements and the Government is working closely with stakeholders across the system to understand the impact the current change in provision has had on children and families. A timetable for the introduction of the new domestic abuse intervention offer will be confirmed in due course.

The Government has introduced a number of protections for survivors of domestic abuse in the family court. The Domestic Abuse Act prohibits cross-examination of victims by perpetrators and provides automatic eligibility for special measures for victims of domestic abuse in the family courts. The Act also makes it clear that ‘barring orders’ are available where further proceedings would risk causing harm, particularly where proceedings could be a form of continuing domestic abuse

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)