Alun Cairns Portrait

Alun Cairns

Conservative - Vale of Glamorgan

First elected: 6th May 2010


Nuclear Energy (Financing) Bill
9th Nov 2021 - 25th Nov 2021
Secretary of State for Wales
19th Mar 2016 - 6th Nov 2019
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
15th Jul 2014 - 19th Mar 2016
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Wales Office)
15th Jul 2014 - 19th Mar 2016
Public Administration Committee
9th May 2011 - 12th May 2014
Welsh Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 27th Jun 2011


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Alun Cairns has voted in 784 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

18 Oct 2022 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
Alun Cairns voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 103 Conservative No votes vs 113 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 297 Noes - 110
View All Alun Cairns Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(20 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(18 debate interactions)
David T C Davies (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Wales
(17 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(61 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(38 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(21 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Nuclear Energy (Financing) Act 2022
(1,905 words contributed)
BBC (Transparency) Bill 2019-21
(1,407 words contributed)
Telecommunications (Security) Act 2021
(1,219 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Alun Cairns's debates

Vale of Glamorgan Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Bring in a law which enforces professional football clubs to have at least 51% fan ownership similar to how the Bundesliga operates this rule.

The Government should use the recently established fan led review of football to introduce an Independent Football Regulator in England to put fans back at the heart of our national game. This should happen by December 2021.


Latest EDMs signed by Alun Cairns

Alun Cairns has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Alun Cairns, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Alun Cairns has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Alun Cairns has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by Alun Cairns

Introduced: 7th June 2016

A Bill to amend the Government of Wales Act 2006 and the Wales Act 2014 and to make provision about the functions of the Welsh Ministers and about Welsh tribunals; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 31st January 2017 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to require the BBC to publish specified information including all invoices over £500, expenditure by region, details of staff remuneration and exit payments, payments to personal service companies and other contractors, and the outside earnings of staff; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 8th December 2020
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require disclosure of caller line identification by non-domestic callers; to require Ofcom to consider applications for exemption from such disclosure; to provide that telephone providers may not make a charge for providing caller line identification; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 6th November 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. Require the British Broadcasting Corporation to publish all invoices for amounts in excess of £500 each quarter; to allow unrestricted access to the Corporation’s accounts by the National Audit Office; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 21st November 2012

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what policies are in place with respect to sub-sea telecommunication cables; and what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of including the security of sub-sea telecommunication cables in the national security strategy.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) is the lead department for telecommunications policy, including the security and resilience of telecommunications subsea cables. DCMS works closely with operators, regulators and others to assess risks and ensure that the appropriate mitigation measures are in place.

The Integrated Review 2021 acknowledged that the Royal Navy will remain active in the UK’s territorial sea and Exclusive Economic Zone, including by investing in new capabilities to protect undersea critical national infrastructure - including subsea telecommunications cables.

18th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department is taking steps to help protect the supply of silicon metal from Brazil to the UK.

The Government's Critical Minerals Strategy and Critical Minerals Refresh, published in March this year, set out steps to improve the supply chain resilience of critical minerals in the UK. We are collaborating with our international partners to create a resilient and diverse global critical minerals supply chain, including for silicon metal which was one of the cohort of minerals identified by the British Geological Survey last year as having high criticality for the UK.

The UK recognises Brazil as a key player in critical minerals, producing 11% of the world’s silicon metal and 84% of the world’s niobium.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
5th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she has made an assessment of the potential implications for her Department’s policies of the recommendations in the report entitled Fixing the Carbon Leak published by the Commission for Carbon Competitiveness in July 2023.

The Government welcomed and noted the Commission’s report, which made recommendations on a UK carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM) and the UK Emissions Trading Scheme (UK ETS). In December 2023, the Government announced that it would implement a CBAM by 2027 and consult further on this in 2024.

In December 2023, the UK ETS Authority launched consultations on the approach to both free allocation and market policy, seeking views on how the Authority can best target support to industrial sectors at risk of carbon leakage and on market stability mechanisms, including the design of the cost containment mechanism.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of the additional support measures for industries covered by the UK Emissions Trading Scheme in ensuring the (a) environmental and (b) economic sustainability of Welsh industry.

The UK ETS Authority is committed to protect our industry, including those in Wales, from carbon leakage as our economy decarbonises which is why we give free allocations to businesses at risk of carbon leakage under the UK ETS.

We have guaranteed free allocations at current levels until 2026 and are now consulting on changes to better target free allocations at sectors most at risk of carbon leakage from 2026 whilst maintaining their decarbonisation incentive.

A Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism will also be introduced by 2027 and will work cohesively with the UK ETS to mitigate the risk of carbon leakage.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
20th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when she plans to decide the outcome of the 33rd offshore oil and gas licensing round.

It has not proved possible to respond to my Rt hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what her Department's policy is on a 34th Offshore Oil and Gas Licensing Round.

It has not proved possible to respond to my Rt hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether her Department is taking steps to ensure that energy production estimates by wind farm developers are accurate.

The Department does not validate energy production estimates by wind farm developers.

Where generation is supported through Government mechanisms such as the Contract for Difference or Renewable Obligation schemes, measures are in place to ensure payments are based on actual generation, rather than estimates.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what (a) functional, (b) cyber and (c) physical security standards apply to energy generating facilities.

The Department works with Ofgem, the regulator, security agencies and technical authorities, and the generator community, to ensure that proportionate physical and cyber security standards are in place for the energy sector.

The Network and Information Systems Regulation 2018 requires generators over a certain threshold to ensure proportionate cyber security measures are in place to protect the service they provide. DESNZ works with industry to provides guidelines and advice on physical security, reinforced by a personnel security programme.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of creating a set common standards used for the fitting of solar panels on domestic and commercial properties.

No recent assessment has been made by Government on this matter. For information on installing solar panels and general guidance we would recommend the Solar Energy UK website. Accredited installers can be found on the Microgeneration Certification Scheme website.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of (a) vandalism and (b) other damage to (i) solar farms and (ii) other energy-generating facilities on energy supplies; and what assessment he has made of the adequacy of security arrangements for such sites.

The Department for Energy Security and Net Zero works closely with industry, the National Protective Security Authority and the National Cyber Security Centre to ensure energy infrastructure is proportionately protected against a range of threats, including malicious and accidental damage.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
23rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what progress Great British Nuclear has made on its first staged competition for Small Modular; and whether his Department has a timeline for its completion.

The first priority for GBN is to launch a competitive process to select the best Small Modular Reactor (SMR) technologies. This began in April with market engagement as the first phase. The second phase – the down-selection process - will be launched in the summer, with an ambition to assess and decide on the leading technologies by autumn.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when he will publish his Department's biomass strategy.

The Government has committed to publishing the Biomass Strategy in Q2 2023.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, pursuant to the Answer of 11 December 2023 to Question 4876 and with reference to the report noted in the Answer of 27 November 2023 to Question 2866 on Land Registry: Blockchain, whether her Department is taking steps to implement blockchain technologies in areas not related to cryptoassets for finance.

I refer the Honourable Member to the answer given in response to PQ4875.

My department will continue to monitor developments in the use of both financial and non-financial applications of blockchain technology and will work with other government departments and industry to ensure we maximise its potential to spur UK growth and innovation.

Saqib Bhatti
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, pursuant to the Answer of 21 November 2023 to Question 2866 on Land Registry: Blockchain, what steps she is taking to overcome the regulatory uncertainty associated with blockchain technologies.

The Government is committed to creating a regulatory environment in which firms can innovate, while maintaining financial stability and clear regulatory standards so that people can use new blockchain technologies both reliably and safely.


Cryptoasset markets, for example, continue to develop with increasing pace and complexity, which brings risk as well as opportunity. Risk-taking is a part of the innovation cycle, however ongoing turbulence in the cryptoasset markets has highlighted some of the implications for markets and investors. We think this reinforces the case for clear, effective, timely regulation. The Government is therefore proposing to bring a broad suite of new cryptoasset activities into the regulatory perimeter for financial services for the first time. This includes exchange activities, custody and lending.


HM Treasury launched a consultation on the Future Financial Services Regulatory Regime for Cryptoassets in February and published its response to stakeholder feedback and final proposals on 30 October. The consultation delivers on the Government’s commitment to bring forward proposals for regulating activities relating to the trading and investment of cryptoassets, such as Bitcoin.


The Government has already taken action to address risks to consumers and market integrity in cryptoasset markets. Cryptoassets were brought into scope of UK anti-money laundering legislation in 2020, and following the government’s legislation, the financial regulator has commenced enforcement for cryptoassets financial promotions, requiring them to be fair, clear and not misleading.


More broadly, my department will continue to monitor developments in the use of blockchain technology and will work with other government departments to identify where this could require the introduction of further regulation.

Saqib Bhatti
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, pursuant to the Answer of 27 November 2023 to Question 2866, whether she plans to take steps to further roll out the use of blockchain technologies.

This Government is committed to maximising the benefits and minimising the risks of new technologies. The Government has committed to increasing public expenditure on R&D to £20 billion per annum by 2024/2025. This cash increase will support the growth of innovator hubs and continue to fund a range of R&D programmes which will help boost the potential of new technologies including blockchain.

My department will continue to monitor the development of distributed ledger technology to ensure we maximise its potential to spur UK growth and innovation.

Saqib Bhatti
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
22nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether she has made an assessment of the implications for her policies of the open letter asking industry leaders to pause artificial intelligence research, published by the Future of Life Institute on 22 March 2023.

It is important that industry voices are actively engaged in the discourse around responsible AI. British based companies, like Deepmind, are at the forefront of responsible innovation. However, it should be noted that questions have been raised regarding the veracity of some of the signatures of the open letter on Artificial Intelligence published by the Future of Life Institute (FLI). Some of the researchers whose work was cited in the letter have also apparently raised concerns. It is also important to note that the letter is not expressly targeted towards the UK or any other government.

Government recognises the need to act to adapt the way in which we regulate AI as systems become more powerful, and are put to different use. As Sir Patrick Vallance highlighted in his regulatory review, there is a small window of opportunity to get this right and build a regulatory regime that enables innovation while addressing the risks. Government agrees that a collaborative approach is fundamental to addressing AI risk and supporting responsible AI development and use for the benefit of society. The AI regulation white paper we published on 29 March identifies “trustworthy”, “proportionate” and “collaborative” as key characteristics of the proposed AI regulation framework.

The AI regulation white paper sets out principles for the responsible development of AI in the UK. These principles such as safety, fairness, and accountability are at the very heart of our approach to ensuring the responsible development and use of AI. We will also establish a central risk function to bring together cutting-edge knowledge from industry, regulators, academia and civil society – including skilled computer scientists with a deep technical understanding of AI – to monitor future risks and adapt our approach if necessary. This is aligned with the calls to action in FLI’s letter.

In addition, our Foundation Model Taskforce has been established to strengthen UK capability – in a way that is aligned with the UK’s values – as this potentially transformative technology develops.

The approach to AI regulation outlined in the AI regulation White Paper is also complemented by parallel work on AI Standards, supported by the AI Standards Hub launched in October 2022, and via the Centre for Data Ethics and Innvovation’s AI Assurance Roadmap, published in December 2021. In concert, our holistic approach to AI governance combining regulation with an approach to standards development and AI assurance is in line with efforts to develop shared safety protocols, and will at the same time allow the UK to benefit from AI technologies while protecting people and our fundamental values.

21st Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether she plans to take steps to regulate (a) the use of and (b) research into artificial intelligence.

The Government is taking a number of steps to support responsible research and promote ethical practices in the AI industry. The AI Regulation White Paper sets out 5 cross-sector principles which will guide and inform the responsible development of AI. In addition, this Government has allocated £2 million for the development of regulatory sandboxes for businesses to make it easier for them to navigate the regulatory landscape so they can bring innovative products to market whilst doing so in line with our principles. The consultation closed on 21 June and the Government will provide a response in due course.

£8.5 million funding has been made available via the Arts and Humanities Research Council in June 2022 June for ‘Enabling a Responsible AI Ecosystem’, the first major academic research programme on AI ethics and regulation of this scale. This is complemented by the £117 million investment secured this year for new UKRI Centres for Doctoral Training – on top of £100 million for existing Centres funded in 2019 – which include ethics and social responsibility courses for the PhD candidates they train.

Announced in April this year, the Government is also establishing a Foundation Model Taskforce with £100 million start-up funding to ensure sovereign capabilities and broad adoption of safe and reliable foundation models. The Taskforce will focus on opportunities to establish the UK as a world leader in foundation models and their applications across the economy, and acting as a global standard bearer for AI safety.

16th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what recent assessment she has made of the potential risks of artificial intelligence large language models.

The rapid acceleration of AI foundation models represents enormous opportunities for productivity and public good, bringing an estimated $7 trillion in global growth over the next 10 years. However, this technology could also pose significant national security and safety risks. It is important to ensure the right guardrails are in place, as doing so will let us realise this technology's huge opportunities.

The Government has published its White Paper setting out its proposed approach to AI regulation that is context-based, proportionate and adaptable, drawing on the expertise of regulators and encouraging them to consider AI in their own sectors. A central risk function will undertake horizon scanning to identify new and emerging AI risks.

The government has also committed an initial £100 million to set up the Foundation Model Taskforce to build UK capabilities in foundation models and leverage our existing strengths, and be a global standard bearer for AI safety.

The UK is well positioned to lead the world in AI safety. We have announced plans to host a global AI safety summit later this year to convene leading nations, industry and academia to drive targeted, rapid international action to guarantee safety and security at the frontier of this technology.

31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to support future UK spaceflight launches.

The Government remains committed to making the UK the leading provider of commercial small satellite launch in Europe by 2030, with all the necessary infrastructure and regulations now in place to support this. £50 million has been provided to grow new UK markets for small satellite launch and sub-orbital spaceflight, with £31.5 million helping to establish vertical launch services in Scotland. This includes supporting Orbex to launch from Sutherland and Lockheed Martin to launch from the Shetland Islands. Both launches are expected to take place in 2024, with other spaceports in development across Scotland and in Wales.

The UK Space Agency is now developing the next phase of the UK Spaceflight Programme, subject to HM Treasury approval. In addition, the UK invested £12 million into the next phase of the European Space Agency’s Boost programme at the ESA Council of Ministers 2022, aimed at providing tailored support to national launch companies and related infrastructure.

31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps to help support the (a) establishment and (b) growth of the small satellite manufacturing sector.

The Government has a long record of supporting the UK satellite manufacturing sector, and the UK space sector now excels in satellite manufacture, which includes some of world’s leading small satellite companies such as SSTL and AAC Clydespace.

Through our £1.8 billion investment in ESA programmes and £1 billion via UK agency this CSR, the Government continues to support R&D work with these and many other companies such as OpenCosmos, Alba Orbital, InSpace Missions, Orbital Astronautics and Space Forge which are developing innovative nano and microsats. The Government further supports the sector through regulatory leadership in small satellite insurance, finance and licensing as part of our aim to become the leading provider of commercial small satellite launch in Europe by 2030. Significant commercial opportunities such as the OneWeb second generation constellation offer potential to further strengthen the UK’s small satellite sector.

31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to help support the space industry in Wales.

The Government is committed to growing and levelling up the UK space ecosystem. Since 2014, the UK Space Agency has invested over £7 million through its national and European Space Agency programmes to support space companies in Wales develop new and innovative technologies, including Space Forge who have built Wales’s first satellite. In addition, the Agency also invests significantly in academic R&D institutions in Wales, which stimulate and enable industry spin-out companies and applications in other sectors. This includes the £16.5 million investment in the Cardiff University-led SPIRE instrument aboard the ESA science observatory mission Herschel and up to £2.5 million planned funding in the Ariel mission, as part of the £30 million package announced last year.

7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department plans to provide to off-grid businesses on increased energy costs.

The Government has announced the Non-Domestic Alternative Fuel Payment Scheme, which will provide off-grid businesses and non-domestic consumers using alternative fuels in Great Britain and Northern Ireland with a one-off fixed payment of £150 through electricity suppliers. In addition to the £150, a top up payment will be available for large users of heating oil (kerosene) to take account of their higher usage. These top-up payments will require an application to a delivery body and will be banded based on level of usage.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what additional support his Department plans to make available for off-grid care pubs and hospitality businesses on increased energy costs.

Non-domestic consumers off the gas grid will receive a one-off fixed payment of £150 through electricity suppliers in Great Britain and Northern Ireland. A top-up payment in addition to the £150 will be available for large users of heating oil (kerosene) in GB and NI to take account of their higher usage. These top-up payments will require an application to a delivery body and will be banded based on level of usage.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of UK households have smart meters fitted.

Smart meters are replacing traditional gas and electricity meters in Great Britain as part of an essential infrastructure upgrade to make the energy system more efficient, flexible and ensure cost effective delivery of net zero.

Thirty-nine percent of meters in homes across Great Britain were smart meters as of 30 June 2020. The latest data on the rollout of smart meters is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/smart-meters-in-great-britain-quarterly-update-june-2020. The next quarterly publication covering the period from July to end of September 2020 is due for release on 26 November.

3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the regulated asset-based financing model for funding new nuclear power stations.

The Government is looking at options for the financing of new nuclear projects. A Regulated Asset Base (RAB) model has the potential to reduce the cost of raising private finance for new nuclear projects, thereby reducing consumer bills and maximising value for money for consumers and taxpayers. In 2019, we consulted on our proposals for a nuclear RAB model and we will publish our response in due course.

3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much Government support has been provided in subsidies to the (a) marine, (b) wind, (c) biomass and (d) solar energy sectors in each of the last 10 years.

Support for the generation of renewable electricity is paid under three schemes: The Renewables Obligation (RO), the Feed-in Tariffs (FIT), and Contracts for Difference (CfD) schemes.

The Renewables Obligation does not pay a direct subsidy but instead support is provided through tradeable certificates.

Support for renewable heat is provided through the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) which is funded through general taxation.

The table below gives a breakdown of support for electricity generation and renewable heat from marine, wind, biomass and solar technologies in Great Britain. The CfD, FITs & GB RHI schemes are not available in Northern Ireland.

Year

Scheme+

Support for electricity generation and renewable heat (in £m)

Marine

Offshore wind

Onshore wind

Biomass

Solar Thermal

Solar PV

2010/11

RO

0.01

258.0

360.1

248.1

-

0.03

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

-

-

-

2011/12

RO

0.02

371.3

450.9

255.2

-

0.1

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

1

-

-

2012/13

RO

0.03

696.3

494.7

385.4

-

0.8

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

15

-

2013/14

RO

0.2

1,022.6

731.5

484.3

-

36.3

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

49

-

2014/15

RO

0.2

1,107.7

704.9

737.5

-

134.9

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

138

1

-

2015/16

RO

-

1,496.8

805.5

932.0

-

304.0

CfD

-

-

-

-

-

-

RHI

-

-

-

239

2

-

2016/17

RO

0.1

1,533.7

892.8

953.6

-

416.4

CfD

-

-

-

91.8

-

0.4

RHI

-

-

-

289

2

-

2017/18

RO

1.8

2,008.6

1,256.2

864.7

-

471.1

CfD

-

295.8

-

247.3

-

0.8

RHI

-

-

-

368

3

-

2018/19

RO

2.6

2,220.5

1,334.9

1,079.9

-

548.5

CfD

-

587.6

11.3

380.2

-

0.8

RHI

-

-

-

394

3

-

2019/20

RO*

3.4

2,212.2

1,270.9

981.1

-

459.9

CfD

1,276.1

88.7

442.0

-

1.4

RHI

-

-

-

428

3

-

Notes

*The RO figures are based on Ofgem’s certificate report as of 4 August 2020 from their Renewables and CHP Register.

* The RO figures for 2019/20 are provisional as not all the certificates have been issued yet and the full notional value of each certificate is not yet known.

* The figures for FITs are not available as they cannot be broken down by technology.

*RHI payments are made to scheme participants using eligible renewable heating technologies. The RHI figures above relate to both the Domestic and Non-Domestic RHI schemes.

3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the proportion of the UK's energy that will be supplied from (a) nuclear, (b) wind, (c) biomass, (d) solar, and (e) tidal sources over the next (i) five, (ii) 10 and (iii) 20 years.

The Department has published projections of electricity generation by source for the UK which can be used to derive the proportion of total UK electricity supply supplied by nuclear and renewable sources, respectively. These are shown in the table below.

For commercial reasons we do not release any breakdown of renewables projections. Officials need to work in a private space to determine auction parameters for each CfD round to ensure competitive tension. Providing a more granular/annual deployment trajectory for specific technologies could distort auction outcomes.

Proportion of UK electricity supply (gross) excluding net imports[1]

Year

Nuclear

Renewables[2]

2021

21%

44%

2022

21%

47%

2023

19%

51%

2024

13%

54%

2025

15%

57%

2026

19%

58%

2027

20%

58%

2028

19%

57%

2029

17%

57%

2030

18%

58%

2031

20%

59%

2032

20%

59%

2033

20%

58%

2034

19%

58%

2035

20%

58%

2036

24%

57%

2037

27%

55%

2038

26%

55%

2039

26%

56%

2040

26%

56%

The figures are based on central estimates of economic growth and fossil fuel prices and contains all agreed policies where decisions on policy design are sufficiently advanced to allow robust estimates of impact as at August 2019. Further details can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/energy-and-emissions-projections. Figures provided are derived from BEIS Energy and Emissions Projections (EEP) 2019 Annex J, Total electricity generation by source.

[1] For this calculation total UK electricity supply is defined as including generation from storage but excluding net imports of electricity.

[2] Includes a small amount of generation from non-renewable wastes.

29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which projects have been supported by regional selective assistance in each of the last three years.

The Regional Selective Assistance scheme is available in Scotland; it has been replaced by successor schemes elsewhere in the UK. For example, the Department’s Regional Growth Fund has provided £16.6m in 2017/18, £16.4m in 2018/19 and £2.7m so far in 2019/20 to support businesses.

8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to advertise the role of S4C chair.

Preparations are being made to launch the process to appoint a new Chairman of S4C and the role will be advertised in due course. This will be a fair and open process, run in accordance with the Governance Code on Public Appointments.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what progress she has made in appointing an interim chair of S4C.

An interim appointment will be announced in due course, following consultation with the S4C board and the Welsh Government. He or she will fulfil the role from 1 April, when Mr Williams steps down, until a new permanent Chairman is appointed. This is consistent with the S4C Board’s standing orders.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
16th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the establishment of a digital ID scheme to facilitate financial transactions requires primary legislation.

The Government is making good progress to create an enabling framework of standards, legislation and governance to support a secure and trusted digital identity marketplace in the UK, working closely with a wide variety of stakeholders so that the framework meets the needs of different users.

Since 2020, we have published a prototype (alpha) UK Digital Identity and Attributes Trust Framework and completed a pre-legislative consultation. We plan to publish a beta version of the Trust Framework in the summer and will introduce primary legislation on digital identity into Parliament during the current session as part of the data reform bill. We have no plans to make digital identities compulsory but, as more transactions take place online, we want to offer people the choice to prove their identity digitally where and when it suits them, securely, easily and with confidence.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
16th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress her Department has made on steps to introduce a digital ID scheme to facilitate electronic transactions.

The Government is making good progress to create an enabling framework of standards, legislation and governance to support a secure and trusted digital identity marketplace in the UK, working closely with a wide variety of stakeholders so that the framework meets the needs of different users.

Since 2020, we have published a prototype (alpha) UK Digital Identity and Attributes Trust Framework and completed a pre-legislative consultation. We plan to publish a beta version of the Trust Framework in the summer and will introduce primary legislation on digital identity into Parliament during the current session as part of the data reform bill. We have no plans to make digital identities compulsory but, as more transactions take place online, we want to offer people the choice to prove their identity digitally where and when it suits them, securely, easily and with confidence.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when he plans to update the electronic communications code; and what plans he has to amend that code to support the rollout and development of the 5G network.

We recently consulted on whether changes to the Electronic Communications Code were necessary in order to support the deployment of digital infrastructure, including 5G. The responses to that consultation are currently being considered and a consultation response will be published in due course. We have confirmed our intention to legislate in this Parliamentary session and will bring forward legislative proposals as soon as parliamentary time allows.

23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to promote T-Levels.

We want as many young people as possible to benefit from T Levels, the new gold standard in technical education. In January this year we launched our ‘Get the Jump’ campaign, which helps 14-19 year olds explore their education and training options, and spotlights T Levels, Apprenticeships, Traineeships and Higher Technical Qualifications in particular. We are working closely with the Careers and Enterprise Company, Apprenticeship Support and Knowledge programme, Academy Trusts and other representative bodies to ensure that teachers and careers leaders have the information and resources they need to communicate the benefits of T Levels to their students. In addition, this August will see the first T Levels results day and there are a number of activities planned to celebrate and promote the achievements of the first cohort of T Level students, both regionally and around social media to signpost students to the dedicated T Levels website.

Our ‘Join the Skills Revolution’ campaign promotes government’s training and employment schemes, including T Levels, to employers. We are also engaging directly with employers to raise awareness of T Levels and promote industry placements, and we have established a T Level employer ambassador network so that employers can promote T Levels within their industry networks.

Both campaigns make use of a wide range of channels, including use of social media to get through to young people, parents and employers.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she plans to take to help develop the UK's biomass industry.

The Government intends to publish a Biomass Strategy later this year, which will review the amount of sustainable biomass, including perennial energy crops and short rotation forestry, available to the UK. The Strategy will examine how biomass could be best used across the economy to help achieve the Government’s net zero and wider environmental commitments, while also supporting energy security.

The Government announced £36 million of funding for the Biomass Feedstocks Innovation programme, funded through the £1 billion Net Zero Innovation Portfolio. The Programme aims to increase the production of sustainable biomass feedstocks in the UK by funding innovative ideas that address barriers to biomass feedstock production. The knowledge developed from these projects will help to inform future policy on domestic biomass.

15th Jul 2021
What assessment she has made of the potential merits of the UK-Australia free trade deal for food producers.

This deal will support jobs and drive growth by cutting tariffs on key UK exports like food (up to around 20% on cheese) bringing huge benefits to the UK’s agri-food sector.

Wales’ food and drink sector exported £10m to Australia last year in goods and could benefit from the removal of tariffs and non-tariff barriers.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Jan 2021
What steps her Department has taken to promote the export of British manufactured small modular nuclear reactors.

DIT recognises the export potential of UK manufactured small modular reactors and we are providing support to industry in several countries to facilitate market entry and position them for success ahead of first production. We are also in discussions with industry about developing a more strategic “Whole of Government” approach to support overseas sales.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
23rd Jan 2020
What assessment she has made of the potential economic opportunities for the UK of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) is an ambitious regional trade agreement covering 11 countries across four continents.

Joining would provide us with the opportunity to deepen our trading links with some of the world’s most diverse, growing economies, and will allow us to expand our influence in the world and strengthen the rules-based international system.

No doubt CPTPP countries will be a valuable market for Aston Martin’s new DBX SUVs, which will be exported from the factory in my Rt Hon Friend for Vale of Glamorgan's constituency.

16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the UK's trade relationship was with each African country in the last five years.

Over the last five years the UK has consolidated stronger trade and investment partnerships with African countries, supporting businesses to enter and expand across African markets, and deepening our bilateral engagement to open new trade and investment opportunities.

Over this time the UK has offered almost all African countries preferential access to its markets as beneficiaries of the European Union’s unilateral trade preferences scheme or as parties to trade agreements with the EU. There are 44 African countries that receive duty-free quota-free access to the UK under EU arrangements that also offer preferential access to a further eight African countries.

As we leave the EU, we have sought to replicate the effects of EU trade arrangements and have secured trade continuity with 46 African countries.

The UK’s trade flows with each African country are published by the Office for National Statistics.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of (a) legal and (b) industry standards for emerging technologies for autonomous vehicles.

The Government paper “Connected & Automated Mobility 2025: realising the benefits of self-driving vehicles in the UK” sets out the Government’s plans to support the development and deployment of safe self-driving vehicles in the UK. This includes proposals for a comprehensive regulatory, legislative and safety framework. The Department remains committed to these plans will bring forward primary legislation as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Alongside developing legal and regulatory frameworks, the government has committed £100 million of new Research and Development funding following the Government’s Spending Review for the period 2022/23 to 2024/25, which is allocated to the Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CCAV) through two Departments:

  1. £66 million in the Department for Business and Trade to support commercial deployment of connected and self-driving technologies.
  2. £34 million in the Department for Transport (DfT) for creation of a safety assurance framework for self-driving vehicles.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his Department’s latest plans are to support the rollout of autonomous vehicles.

The Government paper “Connected & Automated Mobility 2025: realising the benefits of self-driving vehicles in the UK” sets out the Government’s plans to support the development and deployment of safe self-driving vehicles in the UK. This includes proposals for a comprehensive regulatory, legislative and safety framework. The Department remains committed to these plans will bring forward primary legislation as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Alongside developing legal and regulatory frameworks, the government has committed £100 million of new Research and Development funding following the Government’s Spending Review for the period 2022/23 to 2024/25, which is allocated to the Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CCAV) through two Departments:

  1. £66 million in the Department for Business and Trade to support commercial deployment of connected and self-driving technologies.
  2. £34 million in the Department for Transport (DfT) for creation of a safety assurance framework for self-driving vehicles.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the track gradient was for each new train station built in the last 10 years.

The location of new stations must satisfy safety regulations and performance and not be located on gradients greater than 1 in 500. Network Rail holds gradient information for each station built in the last 10 years.

6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Home Secretary on providing guidance to the police on tackling (a) illegal or (b) unsafe usage of E-scooters.

The Department has in place a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation programme for the trials. The interim report should be published shortly, and we expect to publish the final report in spring 2022.

Officials have been in regular contact with the National Police Chiefs’ Council who are developing a national strategy for tacking the illegal use of e-scooters (both private use and illegal use in trial areas – pavement and twin riding) to ensure a more uniform approach, but it is not our intention to provide guidance to the police. Enforcement of offences relating to unlawful use of e-scooters is an operational matter for individual Chief Officers of police in conjunction with local policing plans.

Officials have also been in contact with their counterparts at the Home Office to provide briefing for Ministers on the e-scooter trials.

6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he will publish the findings of the trials conducted by the Government on E-scooters.

The Department has in place a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation programme for the trials. The interim report should be published shortly, and we expect to publish the final report in spring 2022.

Officials have been in regular contact with the National Police Chiefs’ Council who are developing a national strategy for tacking the illegal use of e-scooters (both private use and illegal use in trial areas – pavement and twin riding) to ensure a more uniform approach, but it is not our intention to provide guidance to the police. Enforcement of offences relating to unlawful use of e-scooters is an operational matter for individual Chief Officers of police in conjunction with local policing plans.

Officials have also been in contact with their counterparts at the Home Office to provide briefing for Ministers on the e-scooter trials.

14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the (a) longest and (b) shortest amount of time taken for rescue vehicles to reach vehicles that have broken down on smart motorways in each of the last 5 years.

The number of accidents has been taken to mean the number of injury casualties. The tables in Annexes B, C and D of the Smart Motorways Evidence Stocktake and Action Plan show the number of reported casualties by road class on England's Strategic Road Network (SRN) for slight, serious and fatal casualties. These tables show the casualty split on different types of motorway. These tables are attached for ease of reference. Highways England is currently analysing the 2019 data and, when available, will analyse the 2020 data, which is expected to be in Autumn 2021.

The last full year of data available is for 2019, the statistic for which are set out in the table 1, note that ‘motorway’ refers to ‘conventional motorways’ excluding all other types set out in the table.

As outlined in the published STATS19 data, the number of incidents increased across the network in 2019, and the amount of All Lane Running (ALR) sections of the network also increased over this period. In the time available, it has not been possible to provide data on accidents and breakdowns for each stretch of motorway.

Highways England does not hold data for the attendance of incidents by vehicle recovery companies or the emergency services.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made on the potential for synthetic fuel to drive motor vehicles to help meet the 2035 ban on diesel and petrol cars.

The Government is consulting on ending the sale of new petrol, diesel and hybrid cars and vans from 2040 to 2035, or earlier if feasible. This is in line with advice from the independent Committee on Climate Change on what is required to achieve net zero emissions in 2050. Existing vehicles will be unaffected by this.

Renewable fuels, including renewable synthetic fuels, are incentivised through the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation and are an important measure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as we transition to zero emission vehicles.

Vehicles fuelled by renewable synthetic equivalents of petrol and diesel have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions but are unlikely to offer the air quality benefits of battery electric or hydrogen fuelled vehicles.