Tony Lloyd Portrait

Tony Lloyd

Labour - Former Member for Rochdale

First elected: 8th June 2017

Left House: 17th January 2024 (Death)


Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
29th Nov 2022 - 17th Jan 2024
International Trade Committee
13th Jul 2021 - 6th Feb 2023
Co-operatives, Mutuals and Friendly Societies Bill
23rd Nov 2022 - 30th Nov 2022
Trade (Australia and New Zealand) Bill
7th Sep 2022 - 18th Oct 2022
Shadow Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
23rd Mar 2018 - 28th Apr 2020
Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland
19th Dec 2019 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Minister (Housing, Communities and Local Government) (Housing)
9th Jan 2018 - 23rd Mar 2018
Shadow Minister (Housing)
3rd Jul 2017 - 9th Jan 2018
European Scrutiny Committee
26th Jul 2010 - 28th Nov 2011
Chair, Parliamentary Labour Party
5th Dec 2006 - 6th May 2010
North West Regional Select Committee
3rd Mar 2009 - 6th May 2010
Minister of State (Foreign and Commonwealth Office)
6th May 1997 - 29th Jul 1999
Shadow Spokesperson (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
1st Jul 1995 - 1st May 1997
Shadow Spokesperson (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 1994 - 1st Jul 1995
Shadow Spokesperson (Education)
1st Jul 1992 - 1st Jul 1994
Shadow Spokesperson (Work and Pensions)
1st Jul 1988 - 1st Jul 1992
Shadow Spokesperson (Transport)
1st Jul 1988 - 1st Jul 1989
Opposition Whip (Commons)
1st Jul 1986 - 1st Jul 1987
Home Affairs: Sub-Committee on Race Relations & Immigration
15th May 1985 - 5th May 1987
Home Affairs Committee
18th Apr 1985 - 5th May 1987
Social Services
9th Jun 1983 - 18th Apr 1985


Division Voting information

Tony Lloyd has voted in 2263 divisions, and 8 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Jun 2018 - National Policy Statement: Airports - View Vote Context
Tony Lloyd voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 94 Labour No votes vs 119 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 415 Noes - 119
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Tony Lloyd voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 69 Labour Aye votes vs 138 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 241 Noes - 256
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Tony Lloyd voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 66 Labour No votes vs 139 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 267 Noes - 233
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Tony Lloyd voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Labour No votes vs 41 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 105 Noes - 186
14 Mar 2007 - Trident - View Vote Context
Tony Lloyd voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 94 Labour Aye votes vs 226 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 167 Noes - 413
14 Mar 2007 - Trident - View Vote Context
Tony Lloyd voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 89 Labour No votes vs 222 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 409 Noes - 161
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Tony Lloyd voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 152 Labour No votes vs 162 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 416 Noes - 163
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Tony Lloyd voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 111 Labour Aye votes vs 197 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 196 Noes - 375
View All Tony Lloyd Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Karen Bradley (Conservative)
(43 debate interactions)
Lord Cameron of Chipping Norton (Conservative)
Foreign Secretary
(40 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(24 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Northern Ireland Office
(155 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(93 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(60 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Tony Lloyd's debates

Rochdale Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We ask Government to significantly increase targeted research funding for motor neurone disease (MND).

A new investment of £50m over 5 years could kickstart a pioneering MND Research Institute.

This would lead to better, faster and more definitive research outcomes and hope for those with MND.


Latest EDMs signed by Tony Lloyd

8th January 2024
Tony Lloyd signed this EDM on Thursday 11th January 2024

Sub-postmasters

Tabled by: Kate Osborne (Labour - Jarrow)
That this House notes the increased awareness of the life-changing injustices experienced by sub-postmasters throughout the Horizon scandal; further notes it is now known as the most widespread miscarriage of justice in British history; notes with concern that sub-postmasters have served custodial sentences, suffered bankruptcy for offences they did not …
89 signatures
(Most recent: 6 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 42
Scottish National Party: 16
Liberal Democrat: 12
Independent: 8
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Alliance: 1
Alba Party: 1
Conservative: 1
Green Party: 1
8th January 2024
Tony Lloyd signed this EDM on Thursday 11th January 2024

Pension restitution for women born in the 1950s

Tabled by: Kim Johnson (Labour - Liverpool, Riverside)
That this House welcomes the positive interventions from so many hon. Members from across the House on behalf of women born in the 1950s who have suffered pensions loss through the targeting of their pension rights; pays tribute to constituents and campaigners in their ongoing fight for justice; recalls that …
97 signatures
(Most recent: 25 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 44
Scottish National Party: 30
Democratic Unionist Party: 6
Independent: 6
Plaid Cymru: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Alba Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 2
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
Conservative: 1
Workers Party of Britain: 1
View All Tony Lloyd's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Tony Lloyd, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Tony Lloyd

Wednesday 18th July 2018

2 Adjournment Debates led by Tony Lloyd

1 Bill introduced by Tony Lloyd


A Bill to make provision for the establishment of a High Pay Commission; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 2nd February 2011

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that employers take steps to close the gender pay gap.

Large employers must report their gender pay gap data each year. Alongside this, we have published advice to help employers diagnose the causes of their gaps, and evidence-based guidance on practical actions they can take to close the gap. We have actively engaged with employers to ensure they have the information they need to close their gender pay gaps.

In recognition of the unprecedented uncertainty and pressure facing employers, we suspended enforcement of gender pay gap reporting for the 2019-20 reporting year. However, as of 3rd September, 5,636 employers in-scope of the regulations have reported their gender pay gap data for 19/20. We continue to support employers if they wish to report, and encourage them to act to provide equal opportunities for men and women in the workplace.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what his policy is on Ministers devolving responsibility for answering hon. Members letters to officials.

As outlined in the ‘Guidance for Handling Correspondence’, correspondence to Ministers from hon. Members should be signed off at an appropriate equivalent ministerial level. Where an MP has written about the day-to-day operations of an Executive Agency or a Non-Departmental Public Body, the appropriate Chief Executive may reply.

Official replies to letters from MPs should only be authorised in some circumstances, for example, when dealing with a large volume of letters on the same issue which would lead to an improvement in departmental performance handling or that it has been decreed that under certain circumstances an official reply would be more appropriate.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
16th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, which civil society organisations she is consulting in the civil society dialogue meetings with Colombia under the UK-Andean countries trade agreement.

The Civil Society Dialogue between the UK and Colombia, Ecuador and Peru – held on 18 July 2023 - was attended by representatives from the domestic advisory groups of the parties and open to the public. The UK’s Trade and Sustainable Development Domestic Advisory Group consists of 12 member organisations, representing a broad range of labour and environmental stakeholders including businesses, trade unions and academia.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether there have been any civil society dialogue meetings with Colombia under the UK-Andean countries trade agreement.

Officials met with Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, within the framework of the first UK-Andean Civil Society Dialogue on Trade and Sustainable Development on 18 July 2023. The event was open to the public and attended by representatives from each partner’s civil society, including the domestic advisory groups established under the UK-Andean Countries Trade Agreement. This was a helpful step in the implementation of the Trade and Sustainable Development commitments.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has had recent discussions with the International Seabed Authority on (a) the likelihood of the Authority agreeing to issue exploitation licences for deep-sea mining projects and (b) what assessment is required to examine the potential impact of such mining projects on deep-sea ecosystems prior to exportation licences being issued.

The UK is fully engaged in the ongoing negotiations at the International Seabed Authority (ISA) Council and Assembly, to agree deep sea mining exploitation regulations. The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office leads the UK delegation to the ISA.

The UK’s policy is not to sponsor or support the issuing of any exploitation licences for deep sea mining projects unless and until there is sufficient scientific evidence about the potential impact on deep sea ecosystems, and strong enforceable environmental Regulations, Standards and Guidelines have been developed by the ISA and are in place. The UK’s approach is both precautionary and conditional.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
11th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 3 May 2023 to Question 183026 on Companies: Sanctions, what resources her Department plans to make available for the enforcement of director disqualification sanctions.

The Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill will introduce a new director disqualification sanctions measure. It will be an offence for a designated person subject to this new measure to form a UK company, or to act as a director or otherwise be involved in the company’s promotion or management.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and the Department of Business and Trade are in ongoing discussions regarding the implementation of these new sanctions, including the enforcement function.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will bring forward legislation to make it a criminal offence for people under sanctions to set up UK companies.

The Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill, which is currently in Committee stage in the House of Lords, will create a completely new type of sanctions measure in the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018 called ‘director disqualification sanctions’. It will be an offence for a designated person subject to this new measure to form a UK company, or to act as a director or otherwise be involved in the company’s promotion or management.

It will be for the Foreign Secretary to decide when and how to deploy the measure, alongside the full suite of other sanctions measures.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
10th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps his Department is taking to ensure energy suppliers remove prepayment meters for customers who are (a) vulnerable and (b) at risk of prolonged disconnection.

All suppliers have agreed to cease the forced installation of prepayment meters and the remote switching of smart meters to prepayment mode, except in clear instances of energy theft. This pause was due to end on 31 March 2023, but has now been indefinitely extended whilst Ofgem and industry agree and implement a code of practice to improve consumer safeguards.

As announced in the Spring budget, the Government will remove the premium paid by households using prepayment meters by bringing their charges in line with comparable direct debit customers until the Energy Price Guarantee ends.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
10th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies of the temporary ban on prepayment installations ending before Ofgem’s Market Compliance Review into prepayment meter policies and practices has concluded.

All suppliers have agreed to cease the forced installation of prepayment meters (PPMS) until 31 March 2023, but has now been indefinitely extended whilst Ofgem and industry agree and implement a code of practice to improve consumer safeguards. Ofgem has begun an intensive consultation process to look at what further protections may be needed around PPMs.

As announced in the Spring budget, the Government will remove the premium paid by households using prepayment meters by bringing their charges in line with comparable direct debit customers until the Energy Price Guarantee ends.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
5th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has received the Director of Labour Market Enforcement's 2023-24 Strategy.

I recently met with the Director of Labour Market Enforcement where she updated me on progress in finalising her strategy for next year. When ready this will be published in line with statutory requirements.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with energy suppliers on how the Energy Bills Support Scheme can support tenants with mental health conditions, physical or learning disabilities in supported landlord schemes.

The Energy Prices Act includes provisions to require landlords and other intermediaries to pass energy price support provided by the Energy Price Guarantee, Energy Bills Support Scheme, or Energy Bill Relief Scheme as appropriate to end users who are the intended beneficiaries of the relevant schemes.

As a part of complying with the public sectors equalities duty, conversations with stakeholders included discussions on protected characteristics. These discussions fed into the public sector equality duty and to policy and delivery decisions.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with pharmaceutical companies on differential pricing policies of covid-19 vaccines for different countries.

Pricing of COVID-19 vaccines between pharmaceutical companies and other countries is a commercial matter for those parties involved.

8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will hold discussions with technology companies to help ensure that their platforms are not being used to disseminate Russian propaganda.

The government takes the issue of disinformation seriously. The DCMS-led Counter Disinformation Unit (CDU) works to identify and counter Russian state-backed disinformation, working closely with cross Whitehall partners and the major social media platforms. The CDU encourages platforms to swiftly remove disinformation and coordinated inauthentic or manipulated behaviour, as per their Terms of Service. It also engages regularly with social media companies and technology companies to understand policy changes and other countermeasures related to Russian information activities, and the effectiveness of these actions.

21st Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the reasons for which the number of full-time equivalent children and family social workers leaving between October 2021 and September 2022 was the highest since the collection of figures began in 2017; and what steps she plans to take to increase the recruitment and retention of children and family social workers.

Social workers play a valuable role in supporting the most vulnerable in society and the department is committed to ensuring there is an excellent child and family social worker for everyone who needs one. We recognise the ongoing challenge facing local authorities across the country in recruiting and retaining child and family social workers, with reasons for social workers leaving the profession being varied and complex. However, the current number of full time-equivalent social workers is still higher than it was in 2017.

The department currently invests more than £50 million every year on recruiting, training and developing child and family social workers to ensure the workforce has the capacity, skills and knowledge to support and protect vulnerable children.

Through the fast track and development programmes, the department trains an average of 800 new social workers and provides professional development for around 4,000 others. This includes leadership training, which we know plays an important role in improving recruitment and retention.

On 2 February 2023, the department published its care reform strategy, ‘Stable Homes, Built on Love’, which sets out proposals to help stabilise the workforce. This includes supporting the recruitment of up to 500 social worker apprenticeships, a new Early Career Framework that will set out the development plans for a social worker’s first five years, and proposals to reduce the sector’s overreliance on agency social workers, which will all play an important role in helping to improve recruitment and retention.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress her Department has made on establishing an Early Career Framework for social workers as recommended by the Independent Review of Children’s Social Care.

The department has committed to developing a new Early Career Framework (ECF) for child and family social workers, significantly extending the training and support social workers receive at the beginning of their career.

As set out in ‘Stable Homes, Built on Love’, our children's social care implementation strategy, the initial induction period for all social workers will be extended to two years with an offer of further training and development up to five years. We will explore how we can make the ECF an entitlement for all child and family social workers from September 2026.

The programme will be underpinned by a new framework document, setting out the knowledge and skills social workers need to support and protect children and families. The department is in the process of recruiting an Expert Writing Group to write the framework document and will announce the membership of the group shortly. The group will engage widely with stakeholders throughout the process, and we will also consult formally on the content of the framework document.

​The department is committed to designing the ECF programme with the sector and will shortly appoint a small number of Early Adopter local authorities to work with us. Initially, these will be local authorities that are already running an extended early career programme, beyond the Assessed and Supported Year in Employment (ASYE), before we expand to a wider range of local authorities. In addition, the department is working with stakeholders from across the sector to develop and refine delivery plans, including Directors of Childrens Services, Social Work England, Principal Social Workers, the Chief Social Worker and Ofsted.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she plans to implement the recommendations of the Independent Commission on Assessment in Primary Education.

I refer the hon. Member for Rochdale to the answers given on 21 February 2023 to Questions 141618 and 141619.

22nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the final report of the Independent Commission on Assessment in Primary Education.

I refer the hon. Member for Rochdale to the answers given on 21 February 2023 to Questions 141618 and 141619.

1st Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 20 July 2022 to Question 37614 on Schools: Buildings, which schools in Rochdale constituency had at least one construction element in (a) condition grade C and (b) condition grade D when that data was collated; and which of those schools (a) have already received funding from the School Rebuilding Programme and (b) are expected to receive funding from the School Rebuilding Programme in the next two years.

The Condition Data Collection (CDC) is one of the largest and most comprehensive data collection programmes in the UK’s public sector. It collected data on the building condition of government funded schools in England. It provides a robust evidence base to enable the Department to target capital funding for maintaining and rebuilding school buildings.

The key, high level findings of the CDC programme were published in May 2021 in the ‘Condition of School Buildings Survey: Key Findings’ report. This is available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/989912/Condition_of_School_Buildings_Survey_CDC1_-_key_findings_report.pdf.

Individual CDC reports have been shared with every school and their responsible body to use alongside their existing condition surveys to plan maintenance schedules and investment plans. The Department plans to publish detailed school level CDC data. The Department is still preparing the data and will publish it as soon as possible.

Well maintained, safe school buildings are a priority for the Department. Our funding is directed both to maintaining the condition of the school estate and rebuilding schools. The Department has allocated over £13 billion for improving the condition of schools since 2015, including £1.8 billion committed this financial year.

The ten year School Rebuilding Programme (SRP) is condition led. 400 of the 500 available places on the programme have been provisionally allocated. A list of these schools and the methodology used to select them is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-rebuilding-programme-schools-in-the-programme.

The following table shows the constituencies specified that have schools or colleges selected for the SRP:

Parliamentary constituency

Schools selected for SRP

Huddersfield

Greenhead College, announced February 2021

Rochdale

Kingsway Park High School, announced February 2021 Littleborough Community Primary School, announced February 2021

The 239 schools announced in December 2022 will enter delivery at a rate of approximately 50 per year, over a five year period from 2023. The Department is currently undertaking due diligence on these schools prior to scheduling them, with schools prioritised according to the condition of their buildings, readiness to proceed, and efficiency of delivery. The scope and funding for each project will be confirmed following detailed feasibility studies and condition surveys of buildings.

Where a school identifies significant safety issues with a building, that cannot be managed within local resources, the Department considers additional support on a case-by-case basis. This includes applications for Urgent Capital Support (UCS) from eligible institutions. Schools eligible for Condition Improvement Fund (CIF) can apply for UCS where there are urgent health and safety issues that threaten school closure and cannot wait until the next CIF bidding round.

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has formally responded to the letter on the implementation of the recommendations of the Augar Review signed by 203 College Principals.

I can confirm that we have received the letter from my hon. Friend, the Member for Witney, Robert Courts, and 203 College Principals and I am responding to this letter. My hon. Friend, the Member for Witney, Robert Courts, and 203 College Principals shall receive their response shortly.

13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department has taken to safeguard public health in connection with the supply of antibiotic-dosed meat to supermarkets.

Responsible use of antibiotics is an essential part of veterinary medicine: these medicines are needed to treat bacterial disease in animals. The UK Government is committed to reducing unnecessary use of antibiotics in animals whilst safeguarding animal health and welfare and antibiotic use in animals has reduced by 55% since 2014.

In the UK, antibiotics for animal use must be prescribed by a veterinary surgeon and we have strict maximum residue limits for food-producing animals. There is a comprehensive programme of statutory sampling and testing in place in the UK to look for residues of veterinary medicines, prohibited substances and contaminants in foodstuffs – this programme includes testing for a range of antibiotics, ensuring that they are being used in UK livestock in accordance with their authorisation. This activity is coordinated by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) in GB, and the results of testing and investigations are published on GOV.UK (link) on a quarterly and annual basis.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether (a) current and (b) former workers on the horticultural seasonal worker visa were given the opportunity to inform the independent review into labour shortages in the food supply chain, published on 30 June 2023.

The Independent Review of Labour Shortages in the Food Supply Chain was published on June 30th, 2023. Since it was an independent review Defra is not responsible for commenting on the specific evidence used to shape the final report, but notes that the Review does contain a Methodology section with more information that may be of interest. However, Defra does undertake an annual survey of workers involved in the Seasonal Worker visa route and this information was made available to the review team.

The Government will consider the Review’s recommendations and publish a Government response in the autumn.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the level of compliance with the legal requirement for fishing vessels to report marine mammal bycatch.

The Government recognises that accidental bycatch in fisheries is one of the greatest threats faced by sensitive marine species such as cetaceans, and we remain fully committed to tackling this issue.

The UK introduced new rules in 2021 making it a mandatory requirement under fishing vessel licence conditions for fishers to report any marine mammal bycatch to the Marine Management Organisation (MMO). On the introduction of this requirement, communications were sent out by Defra, the Devolved Administrations and the MMO to ensure that industry understood the new obligations. MMO is planning to communicate again with fishers this summer in order to ensure that rules are clear, and skippers comply with requirements. Responsibility for enforcing licence conditions in Scotland and Northern Ireland is a matter for the Devolved Administrations.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the guarantee of a minimum of 32 hours of work every week for people on the seasonal worker visa scheme will be measured (a) on a weekly basis and (b) over a longer period of time; and what steps her Department will take to (i) monitor and (ii) enforce this guarantee.

Sponsors and employers will need to ensure workers on the Seasonal Workers visa route are paid a minimum of 32 hours per week. This must be reflected in payslips covering the pay period for each worker.

A team within the Home Office compliance network will focus specifically on the agricultural sector and ensure sponsors are adhering to guidance and fulfilling their sponsorship responsibilities.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department plans to update the list of named sponsors on the notice entitled Seasonal worker visa route RFI notice, published by her Department on 27 June 2022.

Current operators of the Seasonal Workers visa route are listed in the register of licensed sponsors: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/register-of-licensed-sponsors-workers.

We will we updating the RFI Notice webpage in the next few months.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 27 February 2023 to Question 146808 on Agriculture: Seasonal Workers, if she will make an assessment of the accuracy of the register of licensed sponsors.

The licensed sponsors for all work immigration routes are listed on the Register of Licensed Sponsors: www.gov.uk/government/publications/register-of-licensed-sponsors-workers.

This is updated every day to ensure accuracy.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the transparency of the seasonal worker scheme.

The government will continue to provide transparency of the Seasonal Worker visa route.

Defra and the Home Office will soon jointly publish information about the annual surveys of workers undertaken in 2020 and 2021, and information about the visa route covering these same years later in 2023.

The Home Office already publishes quarterly immigration statistics on GOV.UK, and the government published a review of the first year of the seasonal workers pilot in 2019 Seasonal workers pilot review 2019 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she plans to publish increased transparency data on the seasonal worker visa scheme.

The government will continue to provide transparency of the Seasonal Worker visa route.

Defra and the Home Office will soon jointly publish information about the annual surveys of workers undertaken in 2020 and 2021, and information about the visa route covering these same years later in 2023.

The Home Office already publishes quarterly immigration statistics on GOV.UK, and the government published a review of the first year of the seasonal workers pilot in 2019 Seasonal workers pilot review 2019 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which operator offered the lowest guaranteed minimum number of hours on a Seasonal Worker visa in the latest period for which data is available; and how many hours they offered.

The guaranteed minimum number of hours offered by the Seasonal Worker visa operators, and how many hours they offered, is commercially sensitive data. There are no zero hour contracts.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 23 January 2023 to Question 120892 on Agriculture: Seasonal Workers, what the average working hours for seasonal migrant workers are at each seasonal worker visa scheme operator.

The guaranteed minimum number of hours offered by each operator and the average working hours for seasonal migrant workers by each operator is commercially sensitive data. There are no zero-hour contracts.

The sponsor licence regime - Workers and Temporary Workers: guidance for sponsors: sponsor a seasonal worker - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) - places a broad range of responsibilities on Scheme Operators to ensure that the rights of migrant workers are protected, including being responsible for ensuring workers have sufficient work, as part of their sponsorship duties.

The Government keeps these protections under close ongoing review.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 23 January 2023 to Question 120892 on Agriculture: Seasonal Workers, what the guaranteed minimum number of hours for seasonal migrant workers offered by each seasonal worker visa scheme operator is.

The guaranteed minimum number of hours offered by each operator and the average working hours for seasonal migrant workers by each operator is commercially sensitive data. There are no zero-hour contracts.

The sponsor licence regime - Workers and Temporary Workers: guidance for sponsors: sponsor a seasonal worker - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) - places a broad range of responsibilities on Scheme Operators to ensure that the rights of migrant workers are protected, including being responsible for ensuring workers have sufficient work, as part of their sponsorship duties.

The Government keeps these protections under close ongoing review.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 23 January 2023 to Question 120891 on Agriculture: Seasonal Workers, what redress is available to workers on the seasonal worker visa scheme if they are not paid; how those workers can access that payment; and how much was issued in redress for that purpose in (a) 2021 and (b) 2022.

The sponsor guidance - Workers and Temporary Workers: guidance for sponsors: sponson a seasonal worker - GOV.UK - provides information for approved scheme operators in the horticultural sector on how to sponsor an overseas worker on the seasonal worker immigration route. Breaching the sponsor guidance can result in the operator losing their license.

The sponsor guidance includes an overall requirement to maintain a high standard of welfare for seasonal workers. There is the expectation that Scheme Operators maximise the work opportunities for participating seasonal workers and we will continue to monitor this situation closely. Operators can transfer workers between farms to avoid seasonal workers being left without work.

The guidance also sets out the minimum pay requirements for this route, which includes paying a minimum hourly rate, alongside satisfying relevant National Minimum Wage regulations, including those on fair rates for piece work, and holiday pay. We do not collect data on redress of pay.

The guidance also requires operators to have appropriate procedures in place for workers to report any concerns they may have.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what welfare measures seasonal worker visa scheme operators have in place for workers who are left without work.

The sponsor guidance - Workers and Temporary Workers: guidance for sponsors: sponson a seasonal worker - GOV.UK - provides information for approved scheme operators in the horticultural sector on how to sponsor an overseas worker on the seasonal worker immigration route. Breaching the sponsor guidance can result in the operator losing their license.

The sponsor guidance includes an overall requirement to maintain a high standard of welfare for seasonal workers. There is the expectation that Scheme Operators maximise the work opportunities for participating seasonal workers and we will continue to monitor this situation closely. Operators can transfer workers between farms to avoid seasonal workers being left without work.

The guidance also sets out the minimum pay requirements for this route, which includes paying a minimum hourly rate, alongside satisfying relevant National Minimum Wage regulations, including those on fair rates for piece work, and holiday pay. We do not collect data on redress of pay.

The guidance also requires operators to have appropriate procedures in place for workers to report any concerns they may have.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government plans to implement measures to ensure workers on the agricultural seasonal worker visa scheme are not left without work due to the prohibition on workers switching between scheme operators.

Recruitment operators can transfer seasonal workers between farms to ensure mini-mum hours are met or if work runs out, they also have welfare measures in place to ensure workers are well cared for.


The Home Office and Defra continue to monitor the visa route closely to make sure operators and growers adhere to the stringent requirements set out in the Home Office’s Sponsor Guidance for ensuring the safety and wellbeing of the seasonal workers, including redress if workers are not paid. The operators of the Seasonal Worker visa route are licensed via a rigorous government selection process. As a minimum requirement, operators must be licensed by the Gangmasters Labour and Abuse Authority (GLAA). This makes sure that all workers are only placed with farms that adhere to all relevant legislation. Should a scheme operator lose their GLAA licencing at any point, their sponsor licence will be revoked with immediate effect.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will outline the process for the recruitment of new operators under the agricultural seasonal worker visa scheme.

The recruitment of new operators under the Seasonal Worker visa route is done by a Request for Information (RFI) process. This RFI process has been run three times to date, in 2018, 2021 and 2022, to coincide with the expansion of the Seasonal Workers visa route. A description of how this process was formally completed for the RFI in June 2022 can be found at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/seasonal-worker-visa-route-request-for-information-rfi/seasonal-worker-visa-route-rfi-notice

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what minimum hours guarantee is in place for workers on the agricultural seasonal worker visa; and what options are available to workers if little or no work is available.

All recruitment operators for the Seasonal Workers visa route offer a guaranteed minimum number of hours for seasonal migrant workers, with most working in excess of these hours. The usual rules prohibiting zero hours contracts continue to apply. Recruitment operators can transfer seasonal workers between farms to ensure these minimum hours are met and they also have welfare measures in place to ensure workers are well cared for.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answers of 21 November 2022 to Questions 84814 and 84816 on Pigs: Slaughterhouses, when she plans to respond to Question 84815, tabled on 11 November 2022 for answer by 16 November 2022.

A response was published on 14th December 2022.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what her Department’s policy is on the long term use of high concentrations of CO2 for the slaughter of pigs.

The Animal Welfare Committee’s (AWC) predecessor, the Farm Animal Welfare Council provided advice to the Government in 2003 which concluded that “the use of high concentrations of CO2 (80% and above) to stun and kill pigs is not acceptable”; and recommended “Government and the industry should fund research and development into the use of non-aversive gas mixtures. The use of aversive gas mixtures should be phased out within five years.” The Government has supported research into the use of alternatives. This includes inert gas mixtures, where there are practical constraints which have so far restricted commercial update. The Government has also part-funded research into low atmospheric pressure stunning (LAPS), however results demonstrated that LAPS is associated with poor welfare in pigs. We continue to engage with AWC on the need for alternatives to high concentration CO2 stunning of pigs.

We accept that there are longstanding animal welfare concerns associated with high concentration CO2 gas stunning of pigs. Following publication in 2021 of the Post Implementation Review of the Welfare of Animals at the Time of Killing (England) Regulations 2015 and as part of our Action Plan for Animal Welfare, we are currently considering a number of improvements that could be made. We have also met with industry to discuss alternatives to high concentration CO2 stunning of pigs.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what advice she has received from the Animal Welfare Committee on the use of high concentrations of CO2 to stun and kill pigs.

The Animal Welfare Committee’s (AWC) predecessor, the Farm Animal Welfare Council provided advice to the Government in 2003 which concluded that “the use of high concentrations of CO2 (80% and above) to stun and kill pigs is not acceptable”; and recommended “Government and the industry should fund research and development into the use of non-aversive gas mixtures. The use of aversive gas mixtures should be phased out within five years.” The Government has supported research into the use of alternatives. This includes inert gas mixtures, where there are practical constraints which have so far restricted commercial update. The Government has also part-funded research into low atmospheric pressure stunning (LAPS), however results demonstrated that LAPS is associated with poor welfare in pigs. We continue to engage with AWC on the need for alternatives to high concentration CO2 stunning of pigs.

We accept that there are longstanding animal welfare concerns associated with high concentration CO2 gas stunning of pigs. Following publication in 2021 of the Post Implementation Review of the Welfare of Animals at the Time of Killing (England) Regulations 2015 and as part of our Action Plan for Animal Welfare, we are currently considering a number of improvements that could be made. We have also met with industry to discuss alternatives to high concentration CO2 stunning of pigs.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what information her Department collects on the killing of pigs; how many pigs have been killed annually in England and Wales over the last five years; and how many pigs have been stunned and killed using high concentrations of CO2.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs publishes annual slaughter figures. Figures from 2017 to 2021 are available in the data sets provided here:

Latest cattle, sheep and pig slaughter statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

The latest Food Standards Agency (FSA) slaughter sector survey conducted in 2022 can be found in the following publication: Results of the August 2022 FSA Survey into Slaughter Methods in England and Wales (publishing.service.gov.uk).

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many actions under the statutory nuisance regime have been taken regarding light pollution since that regime came into force.

Defra does not hold information about Light Pollution cases investigated under the Environmental Protection Act. This information is only held at Local Authority level.

15th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the effectiveness of his Department's policies for reducing light pollution.

We take a broad approach to tackling all impacts on biodiversity, such as artificial light, and have indicators set out through the 25 Year Environment Plan reporting mechanisms which assess the effectiveness of this wider work towards nature recovery.

20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to implement the 25-Year Environment Plan's commitment to ensure that light pollution management eases potential impacts on wildlife.

Defra has funded or co-funded national and international assessments of drivers of change on insects and wider biodiversity such as the global Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services’ (IPBES) Assessment Report on Pollinators, Pollination and Food Production. This report notes the effects of artificial light on nocturnal insects may be growing.

Defra has worked with the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC) to ensure that the National Planning Policy Framework is clear that policies and decisions should limit the impact of light pollution on local amenity, dark landscapes and nature conservation.

Furthermore, Defra has contributed to the development of the DLUHC Planning Policy Guidance on light pollution, published in November 2019, which emphasises the importance of getting the right light in the right place at the right time and sets out the factors that are relevant when considering the ecological impacts of lighting.

A range of measures are in place to ensure that light pollution is effectively managed through: controls in the planning system; the statutory nuisance regime; and improvements in street lighting.

We continue to work with partners including leading scientists to review the latest studies related to light pollution and ensure we continue to address key threats to biodiversity.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Pollinator Advisory Steering Group (a) last met formally and (b) will meet next.

The Pollinator Advisory Steering Group last met formally on Friday 19 November 2021.

The date for the next quarterly meeting is not fixed yet, but we have been working closely with members of the group during the development of the Pollinator Action Plan for 2021 to 2024, which will be published soon.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when a Minister from his Department last attend a Pollinator Advisory Steering Group meeting.

The Pollinator Advisory Steering Group is intended to be a working level meeting between officials and partners in stakeholder organisations. As such, Ministers are generally not invited to join their meetings, and so attendance by a Minister would be by exception.

The last time a Defra Minister attended the Pollinator Advisory Steering Group meeting was on 9 May 2016.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the value of blanket bog peat lands to (a) carbon sequestration and (b) flood prevention.

Blanket bogs can act as a source or sink of carbon depending on their condition. Near natural condition blanket bogs sequester small amounts of carbon per hectare per year (0.7 to 2.8 tonnes carbon dioxide equivalents); however, the largest climate mitigation benefit of restoring blanket bog peatlands is from avoided emissions of greenhouse gases, rather than carbon sequestration, as degraded blanket bogs are more significant sources of greenhouse gases.

Research funded by Defra shows that restoring upland peat habitats can slow overland water flow leading to delayed and reduced peak discharge in small catchments. However, it remains difficult to demonstrate the benefits of peat management on flood prevention in larger catchments.

22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what proposal in respect of a time limited waiver on covid-19 vaccine manufacture the Government plans to support at the forthcoming WTO TRIPS meeting.

I refer the Hon. Gentleman for Rochdale to the answer given to the Hon.Gentleman for Sefton Central on 23 November to Question UIN: 77440.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will ensure that grant money for businesses in the music industry is provided in time to allow their representation at the National Association of Music Merchants show, Music China and Musikmesse Frankfurt.

The successor to the Tradeshow Access Programme, when launched, is designed to address market failures whilst aligning to the Department for International Trade’s (DIT) Export Strategy. Supported shows are identified through departmental business planning, and prioritised collaboratively by DIT’s Campaigns, Sectors and Events Team.

National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) and Musikmesse Frankfurt take place in 2022-23 and will be prioritised through business planning for the coming financial year. Music China was not selected as a priority show for 2021-22.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)