Fabian Hamilton Portrait

Fabian Hamilton

Labour - Leeds North East

First elected: 1st May 1997


Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
2nd Sep 2020 - 5th Sep 2023
Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
10th Oct 2016 - 2nd Sep 2020
Shadow Minister (Defence)
10th Oct 2016 - 10th Apr 2020
Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
7th Jan 2016 - 4th Jul 2016
International Development Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 8th Feb 2016
Panel of Chairs
25th Jun 2015 - 11th Jan 2016
International Development Sub-Committee on the Work of the Independent Commission for Aid Impact
14th Jul 2015 - 1st Oct 2015
Committees on Arms Export Controls (formerly Quadripartite Committee)
24th Jun 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
International Development Committee
4th Feb 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
30th Nov 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Political and Constitutional Reform Committee
8th Nov 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Committees on Arms Export Controls
24th Jun 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Committees on Arms Export Controls (formerly Quadripartite Committee)
10th Mar 2008 - 6th May 2010
Foreign Affairs Committee
16th Jul 2001 - 6th May 2010
Committees on Arms Export Controls
10th Mar 2008 - 6th May 2010
Administration Committee
28th Jul 1997 - 11th May 2001


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Fabian Hamilton has voted in 624 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(12 debate interactions)
James Cleverly (Conservative)
Home Secretary
(10 debate interactions)
Dominic Raab (Conservative)
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Transport
(8 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(5 debate contributions)
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Legislation Debates
Fabian Hamilton has not made any spoken contributions to legislative debate
View all Fabian Hamilton's debates

Leeds North East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Fabian Hamilton has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Fabian Hamilton

21st November 2023
Fabian Hamilton signed this EDM on Tuesday 9th January 2024

Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month

Tabled by: Paulette Hamilton (Labour - Birmingham, Erdington)
That this House acknowledges that November is Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month; recognises that survival rates in the UK still lag behind much of the rest of Europe and the World; notes that pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect and that diagnosis takes too long with slow processes and multiple tests …
53 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 26
Independent: 6
Liberal Democrat: 6
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Scottish National Party: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Conservative: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Alliance: 1
11th December 2023
Fabian Hamilton signed this EDM on Monday 11th December 2023

Adult literacy

Tabled by: Margaret Greenwood (Labour - Wirral West)
That this House recognises that poor literacy skills and illiteracy can consign adults to insecure and low-paid work, lead to poverty and isolation and leave them vulnerable to exploitation; further recognises that people who struggle to read and write can face difficulty in accessing housing, social security, health and care …
42 signatures
(Most recent: 1 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 30
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Liberal Democrat: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
View All Fabian Hamilton's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Fabian Hamilton, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Fabian Hamilton

Thursday 20th January 2022

Fabian Hamilton has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Fabian Hamilton


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the person registering a marriage or civil partnership to attest the valid consent of both parties to the marriage or civil partnership before it is solemnized; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 21st November 2018
(Read Debate)

1 Bill co-sponsored by Fabian Hamilton

Public Sector Websites (Data Charges) Bill 2023-24
Sponsor - Simon Lightwood (LAB)


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
10th Oct 2022
To ask the President of COP26, whether he has had recent discussions with his Caribbean counterparts on their call for a loss and damage funding facility to help tackle the impact of the climate emergency in that region.

Throughout the UK’s Presidency I have engaged with all parties, including my Caribbean counterparts, on the issue of loss and damage. During my time in New York this September, in the margins of UNGA, I engaged with the High Ambition Coalition. Addressing loss and damage will continue to be a priority for the UK Presidency in the run up to and at COP27.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
20th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he is taking steps with (a) Cabinet colleagues and (b) his international counterparts to develop legally-binding international regulations for biological research that poses potential security risks.

The Government published the UK Biological Security Strategy on 12 June 2023. Our vision is that, by 2030, the UK is resilient to a spectrum of biological threats, and is a world leader in responsible innovation, shaping international norms and standards to help improve our lives and the health of the planet. Government departments will work together towards this.

The Government will also continue to use the UK’s wider international influence to encourage appropriate biosafety and biosecurity regulations, including through the International Tech Strategy. This will aim to drive global technical standards, sector-specific regulations and conventions for the safe and reliable uptake and commercialisation of engineering biology.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
30th Mar 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the new Integrated Security Fund will provide funding and resources for the commitments in the National Action Plan on Women Peace and Security.

The UK Integrated Security Fund (UKISF) will expand upon the existing Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF), including its work on Gender, Peace and Security. The new Fund will have a wider remit, funding projects both at home and overseas to tackle some of the most complex national security challenges facing the UK and its partners. It will also bring into scope some key existing programmes, such as the National Cyber Programme. Importantly this change from the CSSF is designed to ensure broader long-term integration of cross-government National Security efforts. Combining additional funding from other programming, the UKISF will have a budget of almost £1 billion, to help keep the UK safe.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
30th Mar 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the new Integrated Security Fund will prioritise the Women, Peace and Security Agenda.

The UK Integrated Security Fund (UKISF) will expand upon the existing Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF), including its work on Gender, Peace and Security. The new Fund will have a wider remit, funding projects both at home and overseas to tackle some of the most complex national security challenges facing the UK and its partners. It will also bring into scope some key existing programmes, such as the National Cyber Programme. Importantly this change from the CSSF is designed to ensure broader long-term integration of cross-government National Security efforts. Combining additional funding from other programming, the UKISF will have a budget of almost £1 billion, to help keep the UK safe.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 28 March 2022 to Question 143578, whether the updated guidance in the Public Contracts Regulations will explicitly incorporate provisions for UK incorporated companies operating globally, to help ensure adequate protections for citizens of foreign nations, particularly in Latin America.

The Regulations require contracting authorities to exclude bidders where they have established by verification or are otherwise aware that the bidder has been convicted of certain offences. These include offences related to participation in a criminal organisation, corruption, fraud, terrorist offences, money laundering or terrorist financing, and child labour and other forms of trafficking in human beings. These requirements apply both to convictions in the UK and equivalent convictions overseas. In certain circumstances, civil matters may be relevant to the discretionary exclusion grounds, for example, grave professional misconduct which renders the supplier’s integrity questionable.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure Government contracts are not granted to companies that are complicit in serious human rights abuses.

The Cabinet Office published in Procurement Policy Note 05/19 comprehensive commercial policy and guidance to identify and tackle modern slavery and labour abuse risks throughout the commercial life cycle. This advocates a risk based approach and applies to central government, executive agencies and non-departmental public bodies. Other public sector contracting authorities may wish to apply the approach set out in this PPN.

This is being updated to strengthen the guidance on using the existing grounds in the Public Contracts Regulations for excluding suppliers and will set out enhanced due diligence activities. This will be published in due course.

13th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps she is taking to implement third-party certification to ensure e-bikes, e-scooters and their batteries are approved by an independent body before being available for sale.

The Government takes consumer protection very seriously and is concerned about the frequency of fires linked to lithium-ion batteries found in e-bikes and e-scooters. Products must be safe before being placed on the UK market.

Working across Government we are taking action against unsafe products and have issued guidance on the safe use of these products. We are also seeking to better understand the root causes of these incidents and have commissioned research from the Warwick Manufacturing Group (part of Warwick University).

This research will help inform the position moving forward including the interaction between batteries and chargers, and the suitability of third-party conformity assessment to tackle this complex issue.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
28th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make an assessment of the implications for her policies of the findings of the report by Independent Age entitled A constant struggle: The impact of high household costs on older people facing financial hardship, published in September 2023, on the proportion of older people on a low household income that had reduced their heating.

The Government recognises the challenges posed by cost-of-living pressures, including the impact of energy bills, and is already providing extensive financial support to households. This includes a package of support to assist households and individuals with rising costs of living that will total over £104 billion, or £3,700 per household on average, over 2022-2025.

We support those most in need with millions of vulnerable households receiving up to £900 in further Cost of Living Payments. These payments are in addition to established financial support which is available for low income and vulnerable households this winter through the Winter Fuel Payment and the Cold Weather Payment which provides £25 during very cold weather. An extra cost of living payment is being paid to pensioner households worth up to £300 through the Winter Fuel Payment, meaning eligible individuals will receive between £250 - £600.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps she is taking to help insulate homes with a low energy efficiency rating in Leeds North East constituency.

The Government is investing £6.6 billion over this Parliament on clean heat and improving energy efficiency in buildings. Additionally, £6 billion of new Government funding will be made available from 2025 to 2028.

The Government ‘Help to Heat’ schemes ensure homes will be warmer and cheaper to heat. The Government will deliver upgrades to over half a million homes in the coming years through Social Housing Decarbonisation, Home Upgrade Grant and Energy Company Obligation Schemes.

Constituents in Leeds North-East can check their eligibility for schemes on www.gov.uk/improve-energy-efficiency or through the home retrofit phoneline service on 0800 098 7950.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
23rd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps he is taking to help ensure that people with Rett Syndrome are able to heat their homes to a safe temperature.

The Government is continuing to provide targeted support for vulnerable households as prices come down. In 2023-24 the Government is already providing additional cost of living payments of up to £900 to households on means-tested benefits, £300 to pensioner households, and £150 to those on eligible disability benefits.

This is alongside existing and ongoing energy bills support for the most vulnerable that includes the:

  • Warm Home Discount providing a £150 rebate on electricity bills for up to three million households in most need this winter;
  • Winter Fuel Payment, worth between £250 - £600;
  • Cold Weather Payment, a £25 payment for vulnerable households on qualifying benefits, is also available to help with the cost of bills when the weather is or expected to be unusually cold.
Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
6th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether the Government has made an assessment of the potential impact of (a) the UK and (b) the EU withdrawing from the Energy Charter Treaty on global efforts to tackle climate change.

The UK has been a strong advocate for ECT modernisation. At the Energy Charter Conference on 22 November, the decision to adopt the modernised Treaty was postponed. The UK has been closely monitoring the situation surrounding the Energy Charter Treaty’s modernisation process, including the positions taken by other Contracting Parties, and will continue to do so.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make a comparative assessment of the impact of legislation on the right to strike in (a) the UK and (b) the EU on the prevalence of industrial action.

While the Government will always respect the freedom of individuals to strike, it is important this is balanced with the right of everyone else to go about their lives safely – and that is exactly what these new laws seek to do.

The new laws we are introducing are reasonable and will bring us in line with countries in the EU like France, Italy and Spain who have had arrangements guaranteeing minimum service levels during strike action in place for many years.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support the beer and pubs sector with energy bills beyond the initial six-month period of Government financial support.

The Government has committed to carrying out a review of the Energy Bill Relief Scheme by the end of the year to inform decisions on future support. We cannot confirm which sectors will receive further support after 31st March 2023 until the review has concluded.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps with Cabinet colleagues to help protect (a) animals, (b) people with post-traumatic stress disorder and (c) people who have other mental health conditions from the environmental effects of fireworks.

The Government endorses the considerate use of fireworks. The majority of individuals who use fireworks do so in a responsible and safe manner and there are enforcement mechanisms in place to tackle situations when fireworks are misused. We will continue to engage with all our stakeholders, including animal welfare organisations, charities, local authorities and the industry, to listen to and understand their views.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to amend Section 414C of the Companies Act and to ensure that companies do not inadvertently allow corporate directors to conceal or otherwise diminish the impacts of corporate negligence judged to be immaterial by the Financial Reporting Council Conduct Committee.

The directors of a company have a duty to prepare a strategic report and are responsible for its contents and their judgements. The auditor is required to review the strategic report and, based on the work done during the audit of the accounts, to state whether information in the strategic report is consistent with the accounts and has been prepared in accordance with applicable legal requirements. Both the directors and the auditor are accountable to the shareholders of the company for the contents of the strategic report.

The Financial Reporting Council, through its Supervision Committee, reviews the annual reports of public and large private companies for compliance with the law. The FRC’s corporate reporting review work does not duplicate the role of directors or auditors. Directors are responsible for the judgements in the strategic report, not the FRC’s Supervision Committee.

The Government will publish a post-implementation review of non-financial reporting regulations shortly. The post implementation review will cover both the 2013 regulations, which introduced the requirement for a strategic report, and the 2016 regulations requiring reporting on environmental, social and community matters, applicable to large Public Interest Entities.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to make companies licensed in the UK legally accountable for failing to prevent (a) human rights abuses and (b) environmental damage in their (i) operations and (ii) supply chains.

The UK has a strong record on human rights and environmental awareness and protection, much of which results from our framework of legislation. The UK already requires companies to undertake due diligence on sustainability matters under existing legislation on corporate transparency. UK listed companies are required to report on relevant environmental, social and governance aspects in their annual reports. Large businesses are also required to publish supply chain transparency statements on steps they have taken to ensure that no modern slavery or human trafficking is taking place in their business or through their supply chains. Both reporting requirements compel disclosure of a company’s due diligence arrangements where these are in place.

In certain circumstances, companies can already be held liable for breaches of duties of care to others where harm is suffered as a foreseeable consequence of the breach.

9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to facilitate community renewable energy generation; what assessment he has made of the potential for the provisions in the Local Electricity Bill to achieve that; and whether he plans to support that Bill.

The Government is committed to achieving its net zero target by 2050 and is supportive of community energy, recognising the valuable role that community and locally owned renewable energy projects can and do, play in supporting our efforts to decarbonise the economy. The Government understands the role of community energy in raising awareness, increasing participation and, promoting the behaviour change necessary if we are to achieve both net-zero and a green recovery.

While the Government agrees with the broad intentions of what the Local Electricity Bill seeks to achieve and wants to see more local energy schemes as part of delivering a net-zero energy system, it does not support the Bill as the means to enable local energy supply.

The right to local energy supply already exists under the Electricity Act 1989 and Ofgem, the independent energy regulator, has existing flexibility to award supply licences that are restricted to specified geographies and/or specified types of premises. Changing the licensing framework to suit specific business models risks creating wider distortions elsewhere in the energy system, which could increase costs for other consumers and further unintended consequences.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government plans to take in response to the impact of potential solar storms on the UK's energy infrastructure.

On the 27th September 2021, the Government published the Severe Space Weather Preparedness Strategy. This sets out a 5-year roadmap to enhance our understanding of severe space weather, its impacts to UK energy infrastructure, and the UK’s ability to forecast events, respond and recover from them quickly. The Strategy is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-severe-space-weather-preparedness-strategy

9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government monitors compliance with social distancing in shops.

On the whole, the British public has stuck to the rules and for the most part have maintained social distance in those retail outlets that have remained open during the pandemic.

Local authorities and HSE will take social distancing guidelines into account when monitoring compliance and considering action against employers who are not complying with the relevant public health legislation and guidance to control public health risks.

The Government will consider if a stronger approach is needed and will take appropriate action as necessary.

11th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has had discussions with Lambeth Council on the potential closure of Brixton Academy.

The details of the O2 Brixton Academy incident which took place on 15 December 2022 are being examined and investigations are ongoing. Licensing decisions for the O2 Brixton Academy are a matter for Lambeth Council. The government is grateful to the Metropolitan Police, Lambeth Council and the Security Industry Authority (SIA) for the work they are doing in this space. We will continue to carefully monitor the investigation’s progress, and want to ensure that the events of 15 December 2022 are not repeated.

18th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of the annual sales limit placed on charity lotteries.

The society lottery annual sales limit was last increased in July 2020 as part of a wider package of changes to society lottery limits.

DCMS published a review of the impact of these in March 2022. Early indicators are positive, for example the increase in the annual sales limit has allowed some multiple licensed operators who previously had annual sales in excess of £10 million, to take advantage of the new limit to restructure and become single licence holders, and use the cost savings in doing so to increase good cause returns. The review concluded that it is too soon to reach any firm view on the impact of the changes, especially during a time that the effect of the Covid pandemic made any evaluation more difficult, given changes in consumer behaviour over this period which may have had a distorting effect. We want to see more data on annual growth of the sector to fully measure their impact.

My officials will continue working with the Gambling Commission, as part of its regulatory role, to keep the sector under review.

18th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions she has had with the Premier League on reports of antisemitic chanting and acts at football matches.

The Government has always been clear that racism, including any form of anti semitism, has no place in football, sport, or society at large. This is why the government and its arm’s length bodies, Sport England and UK Sport, have worked closely with football authorities and the sector to ensure there is continued action to tackle all forms of racism at football matches.

This includes actions targeted at and around football grounds, such as improving reporting systems, providing better training and support for referees and stewards, and improving the quality of CCTV around stadia.

I will continue to meet with the Premier League and other football authorities to ensure that tackling all forms of racism remains a priority.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has plans to review the cap on how much charity lotteries can donate to causes per year.

Large society lotteries raised a record £402 million for good causes between April 2020 and March 2021. Currently, society lotteries must return a minimum of 20% of ticket sales revenue per draw to good causes, but there is no cap on annual donations. The current average return to good causes stands at 46%.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, in the context of the recent success of UK cyclists at the 2022 UCI Cycli-cross World Championships, whether her Department (a) has provided and (b) plans to provide support to enable a round of the UCI Cyclo-cross World Cup to take place in the UK in the near future.

The government, through UK Sport, provides funding towards the staging of major sporting events in line with the Gold Framework guidance on UK-level support available when bidding for and staging major sporting events.

Given that Cyclo-cross is currently not an Olympic or Paralympic discipline, it is unlikely to be eligible for this type of funding (unless taking place as part of an event covering multiple cycling disciplines).

However, UK Sport does have regular contact with British Cycling about their event-hosting ambitions and is supporting the staging of the combined UCI World Championships in Glasgow in 2023

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the implications for her Department's policies of the press release on childcare costs published by Pregnant Then Screwed on 18 February 2024.

By the 2027/2028 financial year, this government will expect to be spending in excess of £8 billion every year on free hours and early education. This is the single biggest investment in childcare in England ever.

From April 2024, eligible working parents of 2 year olds will be able to access 15 hours of free childcare per week (38 weeks of the year) from the term after the child’s 2nd birthday. Over 100,000 parents have already applied for the expansion starting in April, and my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, has confirmed that our latest projections show that more than 150,000 new funded places will be secured by early April.

From September 2024, the department will provide working parents with 15 hours of free childcare a week from when their child is 9 months until they start school. This will increase to 30 hours from September 2025.

Delivering that ambition includes increasing childcare funding rates, with an additional £204 million in this financial year, an additional £400 million in the coming financial year and guaranteed uplifts in line with cost pressures for two years after that. The department is providing grants to help new childminders enter the sector and, to make it easier for the sector, making changes to the early years foundation stage to provide more flexibility.

The department hears every day from families how significant this policy will be for their finances. Once the roll-out is completed, eligible families will save up to £6,500 per year. The roll out will help parents to return to work or increase their hours, and tens of thousands of parents have already successfully applied for their codes, ready to take up their places in April. To see the full range of support they are entitled to, parents should visit: https://www.childcarechoices.gov.uk/.

Hundreds of thousands of children aged 3 and 4 are already registered for a 30-hour place, which can save eligible working parents up to £6,500 per child per year. Expanding this entitlement to younger children across the country will help even more working parents with the cost of childcare and make a real difference to the lives of those families.

In addition to the expanded entitlements, the government has also taken action to support parents on Universal Credit with childcare costs upfront when they need it, rather than in arrears. The department has increased support for these parents by increasing the childcare cost maximum amounts to £950 for one child and £1,629 for two children.

Tax-Free Childcare remains available for working parents of children aged 0-11, or up to 17 for eligible disabled children. This can save parents up to £2,000 per year, or up to £4,000 for eligible children with disabilities and has the same income criteria as 30 hours free childcare.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will take steps to require universities to admit foreign students on the same terms as UK students.

Higher education opportunities should be available to all who have the ability and attainment to pursue them and who wish to do so. The government takes a close interest in ensuring that the higher education admissions system is fair, which includes working closely with higher education providers (HEP) and sector bodies to make sure the system works well for students.

HEPs are autonomous institutions, as per the Higher Education and Research Act of 2017. This means they control their own admissions criteria and the government does not intervene in the requirements providers set for students to access a course.

While HEPs are used to assessing a wide range of qualifications from domestic and international applicants to make admissions decisions, it is essential that that recruitment and admissions practices command public confidence and deliver the best outcomes for students.

The department has launched an investigation into university admissions practices, and will take action to ensure fairness between domestic and international students.

3rd Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of the relationships and sex education curriculum; and whether she plans to review that curriculum.

The Department has plans in place to monitor the national implementation of Relationships, Sex and Health Education (RSHE) over time, including measuring teacher confidence in teaching the statutory requirements. The Department has contracted with the International Institute of Field Research to undertake quantitative and qualitative research, which will seek to understand the quality of implementation, including teacher confidence in teaching the statutory requirements.

The research will aim to test whether schools are implementing the requirements with sufficient quality. It will also inform any further support offers, and test and revise the theory of change for how setting this requirement will improve pupil’s outcomes. Interim findings will support the review of the RSHE statutory guidance, and the Department expects to publish the final report in 2024.

The Department has brought forward the review of the RSHE statutory guidance, including an independent expert advisory panel, which will advise the Secretary of State on the introduction of age limits for certain subjects. Further details are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/terms-of-reference-for-review-panel-on-rshe.

The work of the expert panel will inform the public consultation which will be published in the autumn, prior to publishing revised guidance in 2024.

19th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she is taking steps to provide (a) further funding for Special Educational Needs provision and (b) increased resources for (i) specialist support services, (ii) therapies and (iii) interventions.

High needs funding for children and young people with complex special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) will be rising to £10.1 billion in the 2023/24 financial year. This is an increase of over 50% from the 2019/20 allocations. The funding will help local authorities and schools with the costs of supporting children and young people, including providing specialist support services, therapies and interventions.

We know that children and young people with SEND frequently require access to additional support from a broad specialist workforce across education, health and care. We are committed to improving the supply, training and deployment of key workforces to make the best use of professional expertise, in order to provide these specialist services, therapies and interventions.

In November 2022, the department announced funding worth £21 million to go towards training 400 more educational psychologists. This new funding, in place from 2024, builds on the £10 million announced earlier in 2022 to train over 200 educational psychologists from September 2023.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
19th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to improve training and support for local authority staff involved in the Education, Health and Care Plan process.

In the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published in March 2023, the department set out plans to reform the education, health and care (EHC) plan system. The Improvement Plan does not alter the statutory eligibility for EHC plan. The current test for eligibility for an EHC needs assessment is set out in Section 36(8) of the Children and Families Act 2014.

The SEND and AP reforms seek to make best practice common practice in how EHC plans are delivered. They include establishing a single EHC plan form and supporting processes across England, including a national requirement for the use of digital technology to improve consistency and access to information. We will also test the use of multi-agency panels to enable local authorities to make judgements based on a holistic view of the needs of the child or young person across education, health and care when deciding whether to issue an EHC plan. We are already engaging with children, young people, families, and practitioners to develop this work.

The department wants to ensure that EHC plans, where required, are issued as quickly as possible, so that the child or young person can access the support they need. In 2021 (the latest figures available), there were 93,300 requests for an EHC plan. 63,200 new EHC plans were issued, the highest number since they were introduced. 59.9% were issued within 20 weeks.

The department recognises the vital role local authority staff play in supporting families in the SEND and EHC plan system. We will consider the skills and training these staff require and, when consulting on amending the SEND Code of Practice, will propose new guidance on delivering a responsive and supportive casework service.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
19th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps she has taken to simplify the Education, Health and Care Plan assessment process to reduce the time take to provide families with a timeline for a plan's completion.

In the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published in March 2023, the department set out plans to reform the education, health and care (EHC) plan system. The Improvement Plan does not alter the statutory eligibility for EHC plan. The current test for eligibility for an EHC needs assessment is set out in Section 36(8) of the Children and Families Act 2014.

The SEND and AP reforms seek to make best practice common practice in how EHC plans are delivered. They include establishing a single EHC plan form and supporting processes across England, including a national requirement for the use of digital technology to improve consistency and access to information. We will also test the use of multi-agency panels to enable local authorities to make judgements based on a holistic view of the needs of the child or young person across education, health and care when deciding whether to issue an EHC plan. We are already engaging with children, young people, families, and practitioners to develop this work.

The department wants to ensure that EHC plans, where required, are issued as quickly as possible, so that the child or young person can access the support they need. In 2021 (the latest figures available), there were 93,300 requests for an EHC plan. 63,200 new EHC plans were issued, the highest number since they were introduced. 59.9% were issued within 20 weeks.

The department recognises the vital role local authority staff play in supporting families in the SEND and EHC plan system. We will consider the skills and training these staff require and, when consulting on amending the SEND Code of Practice, will propose new guidance on delivering a responsive and supportive casework service.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she plans to take steps to increase maintenance loans for university students in line with inflation.

The government reviews the support provided towards students’ living costs on an annual basis.

The department has continued to increase maximum loans for living costs each year, with a 2.3% increase for the 2022/23 academic year and a further 2.8% increase for the 2023/24 academic year.

Students who have been awarded a loan for living costs that is lower than the maximum for the 2022/23 academic year and whose household income for the tax year 2022/23 has dropped by at least 15% compared to the income provided for their original assessment can apply for their entitlement to be reassessed.

The government recognises the additional cost of living pressures that have arisen this year which have impacted students.

On 11 January 2023, the department announced that student premium funding would be boosted by £15 million. There is now £276 million of student premium funding available this academic year to support students who need additional help. This extra funding will supplement the help universities are already providing through their own bursary, scholarship and hardship support schemes.

The Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding (EBSS AF) is available to over 900,000 households in Great Britain who do not have a domestic electricity supply and were not eligible to receive support automatically through the Energy Bills Support Scheme (EBSS), providing them with £400 to support them with their energy bills. This includes students who receive their electricity through an intermediary (such as a letting agency or a landlord) who has a commercial electricity supply.

Between October 2022 and March 2023, all households saved money on their energy bills through the Energy Price Guarantee. This was in addition to the £400 energy bills discount for all households. Students who buy their energy from a domestic supplier were eligible for the energy bills discount.

​Together with the higher education sector, we are doing all that we can to support students facing hardship. However, decisions on student finance have to be taken alongside other spending priorities to ensure the system remains financially sustainable and the costs of higher education are shared fairly between students and taxpayers, not all of whom have benefited from going to university.

3rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 20 July 2022 to Question 37614 on Schools: Buildings, which schools in Leeds North East constituency had at least one construction element in (a) condition grade C and (b) condition grade D when that data was collated; and which of those schools (i) have already received funding from the School Rebuilding Programme and (ii) are expected to receive funding from the School Rebuilding Programme in the next two years.

The Condition Data Collection (CDC) is one of the largest and most comprehensive data collection programmes in the UK’s public sector. It collected data on the building condition of government funded schools in England. It provides a robust evidence base to enable the Department to target capital funding for maintaining and rebuilding school buildings.

The key, high level findings of the CDC programme were published in May 2021 in the ‘Condition of School Buildings Survey: Key Findings’ report. This is available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/989912/Condition_of_School_Buildings_Survey_CDC1_-_key_findings_report.pdf.

Individual CDC reports have been shared with every school and their responsible body to use alongside their existing condition surveys to plan maintenance schedules and investment plans. The Department plans to publish detailed school level CDC data. The data is being prepared and will be published as soon as possible.

Well maintained, safe school buildings are a priority for the Department. Our funding is directed both to maintaining the condition of the school estate and rebuilding schools. The Department has allocated over £13 billion for improving the condition of schools since 2015, including £1.8 billion committed this financial year.

The ten year School Rebuilding Programme (SRP) is condition led. 400 of the 500 available places on the programme have been provisionally allocated. A list of these schools and the methodology used to select them is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-rebuilding-programme-schools-in-the-programme.

The following table shows the constituencies specified that have schools or colleges selected for the SRP:

Parliamentary constituency

Schools selected for SRP

Oxford East

Oxford Spires Academy, announced December 2022

Leeds North East

John Jamieson School, announced December 2022

Harrow East

The Sacred Heart Language College, announced December 2022

The 239 schools announced in December 2022 will enter delivery at a rate of approximately 50 per year, over a five year period from 2023. The Department is currently undertaking due diligence on these schools prior to scheduling them, with schools prioritised according to the condition of their buildings, readiness to proceed, and efficiency of delivery. The scope and funding for each project will be confirmed following detailed feasibility studies and condition surveys of buildings.

Where a school identifies significant safety issues with a building, that cannot be managed within local resources, the Department considers additional support on a case-by-case basis. This includes applications for Urgent Capital Support (UCS) from eligible institutions. Schools eligible for Condition Improvement Fund (CIF) can apply for UCS where there are urgent health and safety issues that threaten school closure and cannot wait until the next CIF bidding round.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to provide support to students sitting their GCSEs this year whose learning may have been affected by the covid-19 pandemic.

The department welcomed the successful return of summer exams and other formal assessments in 2022.

The department and Ofqual have confirmed that in the 2022/23 academic year, exams and formal assessments will largely return to pre-pandemic arrangements in summer 2023.

Ofqual confirmed a return to pre-pandemic grading in 2023. However, to protect students against disruption of recent years, and in case students’ performance is slightly lower than before the COVID-19 pandemic, senior examiners will use the grades achieved by previous cohorts of pupils, along with prior attainment data, to inform their decisions about where to set grade boundaries.

The department has decided that formulae and equation sheets for GCSE mathematics, physics and combined sciences exams should be provided for any exams taken next summer. We have asked Ofqual to put this in place and they launched a consultation on this.

The government has also provided a range of support packages to help students recover from the pandemic, targeted at those that need help most.

The department’s ambitious, multi-year education recovery plan supports young people to catch up on missed learning by investing in what we know works: teacher training and evidence-based support, including tutoring and extra education opportunities.

The department knows that disadvantaged children have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. We are committed to helping these pupils to recover and close the attainment gap. That is why the department’s recovery programmes, such as the recovery premium and the National Tutoring Programme, are especially focused on helping the most disadvantaged.

7th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will undertake a review of the eligibility criteria for free school meals before the start of the 2023-24 academic year.

Through the provision of free school means (FSM), together with a further 1.25 million infants supported through the Universal Infant Free School Meal policy, the greatest ever proportion of school children, 37.5%, are now provided with a free meal at lunchtime, at a cost of over £1 billion a year.

The department continues to monitor the situation surrounding the rising cost of living whilst working with other government departments on support surrounding this issue. We do not have any plans to extend universal provision, but we will continue to review free school meal eligibility, to ensure that these meals are supporting the most disadvantaged, those out of work or on the lowest incomes. In setting a threshold, the department believes that the current level – which enables children to benefit, while remaining affordable and deliverable for schools – is the right one. Extending FSM eligibility to all pupils would carry a significant financial cost.

The department is also providing over £200 million per year for the next three years to provide healthy food in the holidays via our Holiday Activities and Food programme, providing breakfast clubs in thousands of schools, as well as delivering the School Fruit and Vegetable scheme and wider government schemes such as Healthy Start vouchers.

7th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential impact of increases in the cost of living on the number of children who will be both living in poverty and ineligible for free school meals in the next three years.

Through the provision of free school means (FSM), together with a further 1.25 million infants supported through the Universal Infant Free School Meal policy, the greatest ever proportion of school children, 37.5%, are now provided with a free meal at lunchtime, at a cost of over £1 billion a year.

The department continues to monitor the situation surrounding the rising cost of living whilst working with other government departments on support surrounding this issue. We do not have any plans to extend universal provision, but we will continue to review free school meal eligibility, to ensure that these meals are supporting the most disadvantaged, those out of work or on the lowest incomes. In setting a threshold, the department believes that the current level – which enables children to benefit, while remaining affordable and deliverable for schools – is the right one. Extending FSM eligibility to all pupils would carry a significant financial cost.

The department is also providing over £200 million per year for the next three years to provide healthy food in the holidays via our Holiday Activities and Food programme, providing breakfast clubs in thousands of schools, as well as delivering the School Fruit and Vegetable scheme and wider government schemes such as Healthy Start vouchers.

7th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to guarantee access to healthy meals for children living in poverty who are not eligible for free school meals.

Through the provision of free school means (FSM), together with a further 1.25 million infants supported through the Universal Infant Free School Meal policy, the greatest ever proportion of school children, 37.5%, are now provided with a free meal at lunchtime, at a cost of over £1 billion a year.

The department continues to monitor the situation surrounding the rising cost of living whilst working with other government departments on support surrounding this issue. We do not have any plans to extend universal provision, but we will continue to review free school meal eligibility, to ensure that these meals are supporting the most disadvantaged, those out of work or on the lowest incomes. In setting a threshold, the department believes that the current level – which enables children to benefit, while remaining affordable and deliverable for schools – is the right one. Extending FSM eligibility to all pupils would carry a significant financial cost.

The department is also providing over £200 million per year for the next three years to provide healthy food in the holidays via our Holiday Activities and Food programme, providing breakfast clubs in thousands of schools, as well as delivering the School Fruit and Vegetable scheme and wider government schemes such as Healthy Start vouchers.

7th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to analysis from the Child Poverty Action Group published on 9 June 2022, what he has made of the implications for his Department’s policies of that organisations finding that 800,000 children living in poverty are not eligible for free school meals.

Through the provision of free school means (FSM), together with a further 1.25 million infants supported through the Universal Infant Free School Meal policy, the greatest ever proportion of school children, 37.5%, are now provided with a free meal at lunchtime, at a cost of over £1 billion a year.

The department continues to monitor the situation surrounding the rising cost of living whilst working with other government departments on support surrounding this issue. We do not have any plans to extend universal provision, but we will continue to review free school meal eligibility, to ensure that these meals are supporting the most disadvantaged, those out of work or on the lowest incomes. In setting a threshold, the department believes that the current level – which enables children to benefit, while remaining affordable and deliverable for schools – is the right one. Extending FSM eligibility to all pupils would carry a significant financial cost.

The department is also providing over £200 million per year for the next three years to provide healthy food in the holidays via our Holiday Activities and Food programme, providing breakfast clubs in thousands of schools, as well as delivering the School Fruit and Vegetable scheme and wider government schemes such as Healthy Start vouchers.

28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to help women on maternity leave return to work in the event that they are finding it difficult to meet childcare costs.

The cost of childcare is a key concern for parents, which is why the government has made an investment in childcare over the past decade, with over £3.5 billion spent in each of the past three years on the department’s early education entitlements.

The department has also introduced Tax-Free Childcare, which is available for working parents of children aged 0-11 (or up to 16 if their child has a disability). This scheme can save parents up to £2,000 per year (or up to £4,000 for children with disabilities) from their childcare costs.

Working parents on a low income, including those returning from maternity leave, may also be eligible for help with up to 85% of their childcare costs through the childcare element of Universal Credit. This is subject to a monthly limit of £646 for one child or £1108 for two or more children aged 0-16.

The government’s range of childcare offers includes 15 hours free early education for all three- and four-year-olds, regardless of parental income or working status. This helps children to develop social skills and prepare them for school, regardless of their background.

Working parents of three- and four-year-olds may also be eligible for an additional 15 hours of free childcare, known as 30 hours free childcare. To be eligible for 30 hours free childcare, a lone parent must earn from just over £7,400 a year, and a couple, where both parents are working, from just over £14,800 per year, to access 30 hours.

Parents can usually continue accessing, and applying for, 30 hours free childcare if they are on paid maternity leave. If parents are on unpaid maternity leave, they can apply for 30 hours free childcare (for their 3- or 4-year-old) 31 days before their expected return to work date.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will takes steps to help ensure local authority accountability in cases where full mental health information is not disclosed to adoptive parents prior to adoption.

Adoption regulations, supported by statutory guidance, provide for a full range of information to be gathered about a child where adoption is considered to be the most appropriate permanence option. The child’s permanence report, which is shared with prospective adopters, must include a summary of the child’s current physical and mental health written by the relevant medical adviser. It is in the best interests of children that all accurate information, where known, is shared with adoptive families.

Where an adopter believes that this has not happened, they can make a complaint under the local authority published complaints procedure. If someone is dissatisfied with the response they get from their local authority they can refer the matter to the Local Government Ombudsman.

As part of the implementation of the government’s adoption strategy, achieving excellence everywhere, the department will work with regional adoption agencies to ensure all adopters are given all the health information about the child they will be adopting.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to help ensure (a) collaboration and (b) information sharing between (i) Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), (ii) GPs and (iii) adoption support workers providing care to children with mental health issues.

Foster parents and adoptive parents receive support in different ways, as their roles and responsibilities differ. Foster parents look after children on behalf of a local authority, and decision-making for the child is shared. Adopters become the child’s new permanent legal parents and make all parental decisions.

We are committed to ensuring foster parents get appropriate recognition, support and training. In July 2018, we published ‘Fostering Better Outcomes’, which sets out our ambitions and priorities for improving the outcomes and experiences of children in foster care.

The government’s adoption strategy, ‘Achieving Excellence Everywhere’ (July 2021), sets out a vision to support Regional Adoption Agency leaders to secure adopters who are well-prepared to meet the needs of children waiting for adoption. It also commits to the development of national standards for adoption support services.

Adoptive parents can access medical support and treatment for mental health conditions from mainstream NHS services. The Adoption Support Fund (ASF) provides support to help adoptive children and families overcome earlier trauma, such as through psychotherapy, family and creative therapies. The ASF has supported nearly 40,000 children to date, and we are investing a further £144 million over the next 3 years.

Most children are adopted before they reach school age, but we recognise the need to support children both before and after adoption. We are seeking to improve mental health and wellbeing support in schools and colleges and have committed to fund training for all senior mental health leads by 2025.

Looked-after children of school age going through the adoption process are also entitled to support from designated teachers and the local authority virtual school heads. The child’s Personal Education Plan (PEP) will include support when a child has a plan for permanence, such as through adoption. The PEP will identify developmental needs, including any related to attachment and past trauma, and outline support for any mental health needs.

The adoption strategy sets out an ambition that all Regional Adoption Agencies will have strong education policies, working with local virtual school heads and designated teachers to use the best practice to drive high quality support for adopted children in schools across the country.

To support better collaboration and information sharing between health services and local authorities, the adoption strategy sets out a commitment to build on the success of the two current Regional Adoption Agency Centres of Excellence. We will be providing funding to other Regional Adoption Agencies to develop Centres that provide joined up assessment and packages of support across children’s social care, education, and health, including better access to children and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS).

Ofsted is responsible for independent inspection of the effectiveness of local authority children’s social care services. Ofsted’s inspection framework includes consideration of permanence arrangements for children who are looked after, including adoption. Ofsted also reviews the effectiveness of leadership and management, and the quality of professional practice.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department provides to schools on providing (a) social, (b) emotional and (c) mental health support to children going through the adoption process.

Foster parents and adoptive parents receive support in different ways, as their roles and responsibilities differ. Foster parents look after children on behalf of a local authority, and decision-making for the child is shared. Adopters become the child’s new permanent legal parents and make all parental decisions.

We are committed to ensuring foster parents get appropriate recognition, support and training. In July 2018, we published ‘Fostering Better Outcomes’, which sets out our ambitions and priorities for improving the outcomes and experiences of children in foster care.

The government’s adoption strategy, ‘Achieving Excellence Everywhere’ (July 2021), sets out a vision to support Regional Adoption Agency leaders to secure adopters who are well-prepared to meet the needs of children waiting for adoption. It also commits to the development of national standards for adoption support services.

Adoptive parents can access medical support and treatment for mental health conditions from mainstream NHS services. The Adoption Support Fund (ASF) provides support to help adoptive children and families overcome earlier trauma, such as through psychotherapy, family and creative therapies. The ASF has supported nearly 40,000 children to date, and we are investing a further £144 million over the next 3 years.

Most children are adopted before they reach school age, but we recognise the need to support children both before and after adoption. We are seeking to improve mental health and wellbeing support in schools and colleges and have committed to fund training for all senior mental health leads by 2025.

Looked-after children of school age going through the adoption process are also entitled to support from designated teachers and the local authority virtual school heads. The child’s Personal Education Plan (PEP) will include support when a child has a plan for permanence, such as through adoption. The PEP will identify developmental needs, including any related to attachment and past trauma, and outline support for any mental health needs.

The adoption strategy sets out an ambition that all Regional Adoption Agencies will have strong education policies, working with local virtual school heads and designated teachers to use the best practice to drive high quality support for adopted children in schools across the country.

To support better collaboration and information sharing between health services and local authorities, the adoption strategy sets out a commitment to build on the success of the two current Regional Adoption Agency Centres of Excellence. We will be providing funding to other Regional Adoption Agencies to develop Centres that provide joined up assessment and packages of support across children’s social care, education, and health, including better access to children and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS).

Ofsted is responsible for independent inspection of the effectiveness of local authority children’s social care services. Ofsted’s inspection framework includes consideration of permanence arrangements for children who are looked after, including adoption. Ofsted also reviews the effectiveness of leadership and management, and the quality of professional practice.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of establishing an independent body to investigate the conduct of local authorities during the adoption process.

Foster parents and adoptive parents receive support in different ways, as their roles and responsibilities differ. Foster parents look after children on behalf of a local authority, and decision-making for the child is shared. Adopters become the child’s new permanent legal parents and make all parental decisions.

We are committed to ensuring foster parents get appropriate recognition, support and training. In July 2018, we published ‘Fostering Better Outcomes’, which sets out our ambitions and priorities for improving the outcomes and experiences of children in foster care.

The government’s adoption strategy, ‘Achieving Excellence Everywhere’ (July 2021), sets out a vision to support Regional Adoption Agency leaders to secure adopters who are well-prepared to meet the needs of children waiting for adoption. It also commits to the development of national standards for adoption support services.

Adoptive parents can access medical support and treatment for mental health conditions from mainstream NHS services. The Adoption Support Fund (ASF) provides support to help adoptive children and families overcome earlier trauma, such as through psychotherapy, family and creative therapies. The ASF has supported nearly 40,000 children to date, and we are investing a further £144 million over the next 3 years.

Most children are adopted before they reach school age, but we recognise the need to support children both before and after adoption. We are seeking to improve mental health and wellbeing support in schools and colleges and have committed to fund training for all senior mental health leads by 2025.

Looked-after children of school age going through the adoption process are also entitled to support from designated teachers and the local authority virtual school heads. The child’s Personal Education Plan (PEP) will include support when a child has a plan for permanence, such as through adoption. The PEP will identify developmental needs, including any related to attachment and past trauma, and outline support for any mental health needs.

The adoption strategy sets out an ambition that all Regional Adoption Agencies will have strong education policies, working with local virtual school heads and designated teachers to use the best practice to drive high quality support for adopted children in schools across the country.

To support better collaboration and information sharing between health services and local authorities, the adoption strategy sets out a commitment to build on the success of the two current Regional Adoption Agency Centres of Excellence. We will be providing funding to other Regional Adoption Agencies to develop Centres that provide joined up assessment and packages of support across children’s social care, education, and health, including better access to children and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS).

Ofsted is responsible for independent inspection of the effectiveness of local authority children’s social care services. Ofsted’s inspection framework includes consideration of permanence arrangements for children who are looked after, including adoption. Ofsted also reviews the effectiveness of leadership and management, and the quality of professional practice.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to enable adopted children to access medical support and treatment for mental health conditions.

Foster parents and adoptive parents receive support in different ways, as their roles and responsibilities differ. Foster parents look after children on behalf of a local authority, and decision-making for the child is shared. Adopters become the child’s new permanent legal parents and make all parental decisions.

We are committed to ensuring foster parents get appropriate recognition, support and training. In July 2018, we published ‘Fostering Better Outcomes’, which sets out our ambitions and priorities for improving the outcomes and experiences of children in foster care.

The government’s adoption strategy, ‘Achieving Excellence Everywhere’ (July 2021), sets out a vision to support Regional Adoption Agency leaders to secure adopters who are well-prepared to meet the needs of children waiting for adoption. It also commits to the development of national standards for adoption support services.

Adoptive parents can access medical support and treatment for mental health conditions from mainstream NHS services. The Adoption Support Fund (ASF) provides support to help adoptive children and families overcome earlier trauma, such as through psychotherapy, family and creative therapies. The ASF has supported nearly 40,000 children to date, and we are investing a further £144 million over the next 3 years.

Most children are adopted before they reach school age, but we recognise the need to support children both before and after adoption. We are seeking to improve mental health and wellbeing support in schools and colleges and have committed to fund training for all senior mental health leads by 2025.

Looked-after children of school age going through the adoption process are also entitled to support from designated teachers and the local authority virtual school heads. The child’s Personal Education Plan (PEP) will include support when a child has a plan for permanence, such as through adoption. The PEP will identify developmental needs, including any related to attachment and past trauma, and outline support for any mental health needs.

The adoption strategy sets out an ambition that all Regional Adoption Agencies will have strong education policies, working with local virtual school heads and designated teachers to use the best practice to drive high quality support for adopted children in schools across the country.

To support better collaboration and information sharing between health services and local authorities, the adoption strategy sets out a commitment to build on the success of the two current Regional Adoption Agency Centres of Excellence. We will be providing funding to other Regional Adoption Agencies to develop Centres that provide joined up assessment and packages of support across children’s social care, education, and health, including better access to children and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS).

Ofsted is responsible for independent inspection of the effectiveness of local authority children’s social care services. Ofsted’s inspection framework includes consideration of permanence arrangements for children who are looked after, including adoption. Ofsted also reviews the effectiveness of leadership and management, and the quality of professional practice.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will take steps to help ensure adoptive parents can access medical support and treatment for mental health conditions.

Foster parents and adoptive parents receive support in different ways, as their roles and responsibilities differ. Foster parents look after children on behalf of a local authority, and decision-making for the child is shared. Adopters become the child’s new permanent legal parents and make all parental decisions.

We are committed to ensuring foster parents get appropriate recognition, support and training. In July 2018, we published ‘Fostering Better Outcomes’, which sets out our ambitions and priorities for improving the outcomes and experiences of children in foster care.

The government’s adoption strategy, ‘Achieving Excellence Everywhere’ (July 2021), sets out a vision to support Regional Adoption Agency leaders to secure adopters who are well-prepared to meet the needs of children waiting for adoption. It also commits to the development of national standards for adoption support services.

Adoptive parents can access medical support and treatment for mental health conditions from mainstream NHS services. The Adoption Support Fund (ASF) provides support to help adoptive children and families overcome earlier trauma, such as through psychotherapy, family and creative therapies. The ASF has supported nearly 40,000 children to date, and we are investing a further £144 million over the next 3 years.

Most children are adopted before they reach school age, but we recognise the need to support children both before and after adoption. We are seeking to improve mental health and wellbeing support in schools and colleges and have committed to fund training for all senior mental health leads by 2025.

Looked-after children of school age going through the adoption process are also entitled to support from designated teachers and the local authority virtual school heads. The child’s Personal Education Plan (PEP) will include support when a child has a plan for permanence, such as through adoption. The PEP will identify developmental needs, including any related to attachment and past trauma, and outline support for any mental health needs.

The adoption strategy sets out an ambition that all Regional Adoption Agencies will have strong education policies, working with local virtual school heads and designated teachers to use the best practice to drive high quality support for adopted children in schools across the country.

To support better collaboration and information sharing between health services and local authorities, the adoption strategy sets out a commitment to build on the success of the two current Regional Adoption Agency Centres of Excellence. We will be providing funding to other Regional Adoption Agencies to develop Centres that provide joined up assessment and packages of support across children’s social care, education, and health, including better access to children and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS).

Ofsted is responsible for independent inspection of the effectiveness of local authority children’s social care services. Ofsted’s inspection framework includes consideration of permanence arrangements for children who are looked after, including adoption. Ofsted also reviews the effectiveness of leadership and management, and the quality of professional practice.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to provide equal support to foster parents and adoptive parents including through provision of (a) training, (b) respite and (c) financial support.

Foster parents and adoptive parents receive support in different ways, as their roles and responsibilities differ. Foster parents look after children on behalf of a local authority, and decision-making for the child is shared. Adopters become the child’s new permanent legal parents and make all parental decisions.

We are committed to ensuring foster parents get appropriate recognition, support and training. In July 2018, we published ‘Fostering Better Outcomes’, which sets out our ambitions and priorities for improving the outcomes and experiences of children in foster care.

The government’s adoption strategy, ‘Achieving Excellence Everywhere’ (July 2021), sets out a vision to support Regional Adoption Agency leaders to secure adopters who are well-prepared to meet the needs of children waiting for adoption. It also commits to the development of national standards for adoption support services.

Adoptive parents can access medical support and treatment for mental health conditions from mainstream NHS services. The Adoption Support Fund (ASF) provides support to help adoptive children and families overcome earlier trauma, such as through psychotherapy, family and creative therapies. The ASF has supported nearly 40,000 children to date, and we are investing a further £144 million over the next 3 years.

Most children are adopted before they reach school age, but we recognise the need to support children both before and after adoption. We are seeking to improve mental health and wellbeing support in schools and colleges and have committed to fund training for all senior mental health leads by 2025.

Looked-after children of school age going through the adoption process are also entitled to support from designated teachers and the local authority virtual school heads. The child’s Personal Education Plan (PEP) will include support when a child has a plan for permanence, such as through adoption. The PEP will identify developmental needs, including any related to attachment and past trauma, and outline support for any mental health needs.

The adoption strategy sets out an ambition that all Regional Adoption Agencies will have strong education policies, working with local virtual school heads and designated teachers to use the best practice to drive high quality support for adopted children in schools across the country.

To support better collaboration and information sharing between health services and local authorities, the adoption strategy sets out a commitment to build on the success of the two current Regional Adoption Agency Centres of Excellence. We will be providing funding to other Regional Adoption Agencies to develop Centres that provide joined up assessment and packages of support across children’s social care, education, and health, including better access to children and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS).

Ofsted is responsible for independent inspection of the effectiveness of local authority children’s social care services. Ofsted’s inspection framework includes consideration of permanence arrangements for children who are looked after, including adoption. Ofsted also reviews the effectiveness of leadership and management, and the quality of professional practice.

2nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that parents in higher education are eligible for childcare grants through Student Finance England.

The government recognises the value of parents continuing in, or returning to education, and provides support to those enrolled in recognised education courses. Eligible student parents may be able to claim for the Childcare Grant, which offers parents support with up to 85% of their childcare costs depending on their household income.

The maximum Childcare Grant for the 2021/22 academic year is:

  • Up to £179.62 a week for one child.
  • Up to £307.95 a week for two or more children.
Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology