Gavin Newlands Portrait

Gavin Newlands

Scottish National Party - Paisley and Renfrewshire North

Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Transport)

(since January 2020)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Northern Ireland)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Wales)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Sport)
7th Sep 2016 - 7th Jan 2020
Justice Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Backbench Business Committee
13th Jun 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Backbench Business Committee
20th Jul 2015 - 12th May 2016


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 23rd June 2021
09:30
Transport Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Zero emission vehicles and road pricing
23 Jun 2021, 9:30 a.m.
At 9.30am: Oral evidence
Rachel Maclean MP - Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at Department for Transport
Richard Bruce - Director of Environment and Future Mobility at Department for Transport
View calendar
Department Event
Thursday 24th June 2021
09:30
Department for Transport
Oral questions - Main Chamber
24 Jun 2021, 9:30 a.m.
Transport (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Monday 7th June 2021
Advanced Research and Invention Agency Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 45 Scottish National Party Aye votes vs 0 Scottish National Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 263 Noes - 364
Speeches
Tuesday 22nd June 2021
McVitie’s Tollcross Factory

I am grateful to the Minister for giving way; I had not given him an indication that I would intervene. …

Written Answers
Monday 7th June 2021
Sports: Coronavirus
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the …
Early Day Motions
Monday 7th June 2021
Ratification of the Istanbul Convention
That this House notes that 8 June 2021 will mark nine years since the UK signed the Istanbul Convention on …
Bills
Wednesday 4th November 2020
Employment (Dismissal and Re-employment) (No. 2) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to prohibit employers dismissing employees and subsequently re-employing them for the purpose of diminishing the terms and conditions …
Tweets
Tuesday 22nd June 2021
23:37
MP Financial Interests
Tuesday 1st June 2021
1. Employment and earnings
Payments from YouGov, 50 Featherstone Street, London EC1Y 8RT, for completing surveys. All fees paid direct to Paisley and Renfrewshire …
EDM signed
Monday 7th June 2021
40th anniversary of the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes
That this House recognises that 2021 marks the 40th anniversary of the 1981 International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes; …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Gavin Newlands has voted in 210 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Gavin Newlands Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(26 debate interactions)
Grant Shapps (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Transport
(24 debate interactions)
Paul Scully (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(19 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Transport
(49 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(23 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Gavin Newlands's debates

Paisley and Renfrewshire North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Paisley and Renfrewshire North signature proportion
Petitions with most Paisley and Renfrewshire North signatures
Gavin Newlands has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Gavin Newlands

7th June 2021
Gavin Newlands signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Monday 7th June 2021

Ratification of the Istanbul Convention

Tabled by: Gavin Newlands (Scottish National Party - Paisley and Renfrewshire North)
That this House notes that 8 June 2021 will mark nine years since the UK signed the Istanbul Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence; acknowledges the work by the former hon. Member for Banff and Buchan, Eilidh Whiteford, in securing the passage of legislation enshrining …
23 signatures
(Most recent: 16 Jun 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 10
Labour: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alba Party: 2
Independent: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
24th May 2021
Gavin Newlands signed this EDM on Monday 7th June 2021

40th anniversary of the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes

Tabled by: Alison Thewliss (Scottish National Party - Glasgow Central)
That this House recognises that 2021 marks the 40th anniversary of the 1981 International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes; believes that the Code exists to protect all babies, regardless of how they are fed; notes the Code regulates the marketing of breastmilk substitutes which includes infant formulas, follow-on formulas …
22 signatures
(Most recent: 16 Jun 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 13
Plaid Cymru: 3
Labour: 3
Independent: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
View All Gavin Newlands's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Gavin Newlands, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Gavin Newlands has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Gavin Newlands has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Gavin Newlands


A Bill to prohibit employers dismissing employees and subsequently re-employing them for the purpose of diminishing the terms and conditions of employment; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Tuesday 9th June 2020

A Bill to prohibit employers dismissing employees and subsequently re-employing them for the purpose of diminishing the terms and conditions of employment; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Wednesday 4th November 2020
(Read Debate)

Gavin Newlands has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


115 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that there are minimal delays at the border due to non-tariff barriers to trade.

The Government has provided comprehensive guidance on the new arrangements for trade with the EU. We are working closely with the devolved administrations, operational partners, industry groups and transporters to minimise any potential disruption. The Border Operating Centre is operating around the clock to pull together all the necessary sources of information to track what is happening at the border.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with ACAS on bringing forward legislative proposals on employment rights.

I have monthly meetings with the ACAS Chair, Clare Chapman, and Chief Executive, Susan Clews, that cover both operational and policy matters. ACAS are an important partner for the Department, and provide important insight into workplace issues as we prepare for an Employment Bill.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of employees who have been subject to dismissal and re-engagement proceedings in the last 12 months.

The Department engaged ACAS to gather evidence of how fire and rehire is being used and they have concluded their work. ACAS engaged with a range of groups, including employer bodies and trade unions, as well as professional bodies with advisory contact with employers, such as employment lawyers, accountants, and payroll services.

Officials are now giving ACAS’ due consideration, and the Government will respond in due course.

The Department does not collect quantitative evidence on dismissal and re-engagement.

Employers are however required to notify my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State if they are proposing making more than 20 people redundant. The Office for National Statistics produce detailed statistics on redundancies by industry and individual characteristics.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the ACAS report on fire and rehire will be published.

The Department engaged ACAS to gather evidence of how fire and rehire is being used and they have concluded their work. ACAS engaged with a range of groups, including employer bodies and trade unions, as well as professional bodies with advisory contact with employers, such as employment lawyers, accountants, and payroll services.

Officials are now giving ACAS’ due consideration, and the Government will respond in due course.

The Department does not collect quantitative evidence on dismissal and re-engagement.

Employers are however required to notify my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State if they are proposing making more than 20 people redundant. The Office for National Statistics produce detailed statistics on redundancies by industry and individual characteristics.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with (a) employers’ representatives, (b) employee representatives; and(c) devolved Administrations on potential amendments to the Employment Rights Act 1996.

Ministers meet regularly with stakeholders, including representatives of employers and employees on various employment-related issues, including matters concerning the Employment Rights Act 1996.

Employment Law is a reserved area except in Northern Ireland where it is devolved. BEIS will continue to work with each devolved administration respecting their unique settlements to ensure we build a strong economy across the United Kingdom.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Prime Minister's answer to oral Question 910650 of 13 January 2021, how many meetings have taken place between Ministers in his Department and ACAS on fire and rehire employment practices.

BEIS Ministers meet with Acas monthly. These meetings cover a variety of employment matters.

Acas is holding independent and impartial discussions with a range of stakeholders on the use of fire and rehire practices to change contractual terms and conditions. BEIS officials have met regularly with Acas to discuss insights from this work and the circumstances when fire and hire practices are used.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of correspondence acknowledging receipt of a complaint on Green Deal loan mis-selling has been sent by his Department within 15 days in line with departmental targets.

The Department does not record data on correspondence acknowledging receipt of a complaint on Green Deal loan mis-selling which has been sent by this Department. Complaints on Green Deal mis-selling can be received through a number of routes, including email, post, and official Department and Ministerial correspondence.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the role is of the Financial Ombudsman Service in handling complaints received by his Department in relation to the Green Deal.

For complaints about mis-selling, the Financial Ombudsman Service is responsible for initial reviews. For many, but not all, complaints about other Green Deal matters, such as installation quality, the Green Deal Ombudsman is contracted to complete initial reviews.

In all cases, decisions regarding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed, are the responsibility of my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State.

Complainants do not receive direct correspondence from the Financial Ombudsman Service as part of the reviews of complaints submitted to the Secretary of State. In addition to the work it completes on complaints to the Secretary of State, the Financial Ombudsman Service more generally handles Green Deal complaints about financing issues as part of its statutory role under the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000. Some such complaints may subsequently be referred to the Secretary of State for review and may be the subject of associated correspondence between the Financial Ombudsman Service and the complainant, but such correspondence stands outside of the formal review process.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what redress is available for people who have inherited a property associated with a Green Deal loan where there is concern that the person from whom they inherited the property was potentially mis-sold that loan.

Under the Green Deal Framework regulations, loans can be reduced or cancelled where there has been a breach of the relevant rules, and my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State is satisfied that the consumer has suffered, or is likely to suffer, a substantive loss. This applies to any complaint which meets the eligibility requirements regardless of whether it concerns a Green Deal Plan that was in place at a property prior to a complainant inheriting that property.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many complaints he has received in relation to Green Deal mis-selling by Helms where the complainant was not the person in whose name the original credit agreement was made.

The Department does not record data on the number of complaints about mis-selling of Green Deal Plans by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) received from complainants who did not enter the original credit agreement as the property “improver”. Complaints to my Rt, Hon. Friend the Secretary of State can be made under the Green Deal Framework regulations by original improvers or subsequent bill payers (other eligibility criteria must also met).

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the role of the Green Deal Ombudsman is in handling complaints received by him in relation to the Green Deal.

For complaints about mis-selling, the Financial Ombudsman Service is responsible for initial reviews. For many, but not all, complaints about other Green Deal matters, such as installation quality, the Green Deal Ombudsman is contracted to complete initial reviews.

In all cases, decisions regarding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed, are the responsibility of my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State.

Complainants do not receive direct correspondence from the Financial Ombudsman Service as part of the reviews of complaints submitted to the Secretary of State. In addition to the work it completes on complaints to the Secretary of State, the Financial Ombudsman Service more generally handles Green Deal complaints about financing issues as part of its statutory role under the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000. Some such complaints may subsequently be referred to the Secretary of State for review and may be the subject of associated correspondence between the Financial Ombudsman Service and the complainant, but such correspondence stands outside of the formal review process.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether people who have sent complaints to his Department on the mis-selling of Green Deal loans by Helms receive direct correspondence from the Financial Ombudsman Service in relation to their case.

For complaints about mis-selling, the Financial Ombudsman Service is responsible for initial reviews. For many, but not all, complaints about other Green Deal matters, such as installation quality, the Green Deal Ombudsman is contracted to complete initial reviews.

In all cases, decisions regarding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed, are the responsibility of my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State.

Complainants do not receive direct correspondence from the Financial Ombudsman Service as part of the reviews of complaints submitted to the Secretary of State. In addition to the work it completes on complaints to the Secretary of State, the Financial Ombudsman Service more generally handles Green Deal complaints about financing issues as part of its statutory role under the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000. Some such complaints may subsequently be referred to the Secretary of State for review and may be the subject of associated correspondence between the Financial Ombudsman Service and the complainant, but such correspondence stands outside of the formal review process.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
4th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the potential effect of the UK Government's single market proposals on the movement of agricultural goods.

The UK Internal Market Bill ensures the UK can operate as a coherent internal market, guaranteeing UK companies can trade unhindered in every part of the UK while maintaining world-leading standards for consumers, workers, food and the environment.

The UK has some of the highest standards in the world on goods and some of the most robust standards on foods, with world-leading food, animal and plant health and animal welfare standards.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he will take to prevent fraudulent claims being made by contractors and individuals to the Green Homes Grant scheme.

The Government has a zero-tolerance approach to fraud. A bespoke package of counter-fraud measures will be built into the scheme design, drawing on best practice and lessons learnt?from previous domestic and international?schemes.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he made of the effectiveness of the Green Deal scheme as part of devising the Green Homes Grant scheme.

In his Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £2bn Green Home Grant scheme that will support homeowners and landlords of rented homes in England to improve the energy efficiency of their properties, reducing energy bills and carbon emissions, and supporting a green economic recovery.

The funding will be spent on paying for accredited tradespeople to install a range of measures, for example insulation, to improve the energy performance of their homes. Further detail on the eligibility for the scheme will be announced in the coming days, before the scheme’s full launch.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether households under an obligation under the Green Deal scheme will be eligible for the Green Homes Grant.

In his Summer Economic Update, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £2bn Green Home Grant scheme that will support homeowners and landlords of rented homes in England to improve the energy efficiency of their properties, reducing energy bills and carbon emissions, and supporting a green economic recovery.

The funding will be spent on paying for accredited tradespeople to install a range of measures, for example insulation, to improve the energy performance of their homes. Further detail on the eligibility for the scheme will be announced in the coming days, before the scheme’s full launch.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many meetings have taken place between Ministers in his Department and representatives of Rolls-Royce Holdings plc from 1 March 2020 to 12 June 2020; (b) on what dates those meetings took place and (c) what topics were discussed at those meetings.

Ministers in the Department hold many meetings with companies, including Rolls-Royce, to discuss a wide range of business issues.

Details of meetings held by Ministers in the Department are recorded in our transparency data, which is published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/beis-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to maintain continuity of (a) petroleum and (b) diesel supply in the event of a public health emergency.

The Department continues to work closely with the fuel sector to ensure that plans are in place to maintain the supply of petroleum and diesel in the event of a public health emergency.

The sector is used to varying levels of demand, and disruptions to supply, for example during inclement weather, and is adept at directing resource to where it is most needed. In addition, the Government has a long-standing fuel supply contingency programme that can be deployed in support of industry to maintain fuel supplies as close to normal levels as possible.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Green Deal loan appeals in respect of Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd have been referred to her Department for (a) less than three months, (b) between three and six months, (c) between six and nine months, (d) between nine and twelve months and (e) more than twelve months without a final decision having been made in each (i) constituency, (ii) local authority area and (iii) NUTS first level region.

As of 3rd March 2020, there are 147 outstanding appeals, relating to the company Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS), which have been referred to my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State.

The Regulations require that, before imposing any sanction, the Secretary of State gives notice to affected parties of his intention to impose a sanction and provides them with an opportunity to make representations before it is made final. To date, 83 Intention Notices have been issued in respect of the outstanding HELMS appeals.

The tables attached provide details of the age of the outstanding appeals, broken down by (i) constituency, (ii) local authority area and (iii) NUTS first level region.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the comparability factors to be applied to the summer phase of the UK Government’s Sport Recovery Package.

For the summer phase of the Sport Survival Package, as with all government interventions, the Green Book guidance was applied. The Green Book is issued by HM Treasury, providing guidance on how to appraise policies, programmes and projects.The Treasury’s five case model is the means of developing proposals in a holistic way that optimises the social / public value produced by the use of public resources. Therefore, the Sport Survival Package has been assessed using a cost benefit analysis, ensuring value for money.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many people under 18 years of age have participated in cricket since 2005.

Data from the Active Lives Children and Young People Survey show that in the 2018-19 academic year 575,800 children and young people in England aged 5-16 participated in cricket at least once a week. This is an increase of 1.8% since the previous year (441,500 in 2017-18) when the survey was launched. Data on those aged 16+ is collected through the Active Lives Survey. Reports and data tables for both surveys can be found on Sport England’s website: https://www.sportengland.org/know-your-audience/data/active-lives.

Grassroots sport is a devolved matter, so data on cricket participation in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland is a matter for the devolved administrations of those nations.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect on participation rates by young people of media coverage of sporting events listed under Group A under the terms outlined in Part IV of the Broadcasting Act 1996; and if he will make statement.

Britain is a sporting superpower; our shared victories in London and Rio demonstrated not only our sporting prowess but also the pride and passion for sport that is central to our national identity. That is why the Broadcasting Act 1996 ensures that events of special national significance such as the Olympics and Paralympics can be seen as widely as possible. While DCMS has not conducted a study into the impact of viewing the specific events listed in 'Group A' on children's activity levels, we know that they have the power to unite the nation, and to inspire us all to get active.

The Active Lives Children and Young People Survey shows that 3.3m (46.8%) of children and young people (aged 5-16) in England met the Chief Medical Officers’ guidance on physical activity in 2018-19. This is an increase of 279,000 since the previous year. However this means that over half do not do enough exercise to benefit their health. The School Sport and Activity Action Plan, published last July, set out government’s commitment to tackling this important issue, and ensuring that all children and young people have access to at least 60 minutes of high quality sport and PE every day.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the (a) Scottish Rugby Union, (b) Irish Rugby Football Union, (c) Welsh Rugby Union and (d) Rugby Football Union on increasing participation rates in rugby union.

The Secretary of State and I meet with sports national governing bodies on a regular basis to ensure they are supporting grassroots participation in line with the objectives of the government's Sporting Future strategy. Ministers continue to work with national governing bodies of sport to ensure that the Sporting Future strategy is implemented effectively, and that grassroots participation is supported.

Sport is a devolved matter and therefore support for grassroots sport and physical activity in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland is the responsibility of the respective Home Nations Sports Councils and devolved governments.

The Rugby Football Union (RFU) is in regular contact with Sport England, which is the organisation directly responsible for investing in and supporting grassroots sport in England. Through Sport England, government is investing £12.6m in the RFU over 2017-21 for its work on participation and supporting talented young athletes. Since 2016, England has invested a further £12.61m in multi-sport projects where rugby union is identified as one of the sports benefitting.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions officials in her Department have had with their counterparts in the Home Office on the effect of Tier 4 visa regulations on amateur sports.

DCMS and Home Office officials are in regular contact on matters relating to visas for sport. The Home Office also routinely engages with sports governing bodies, organisations within the sport sector and other government departments on visa issues.

Home Office definitions of amateur and professional sports persons contained in the immigration rules were established following full consultation with all recognised sports governing bodies. The full definitions can be found in the document attached. The rules surrounding entering the UK on a Tier 4 (General) student visa can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/tier-4-general-visa.

Tier 4 visas have restrictions imposed regarding what work can be undertaken during the period agreed. For example, one of the conditions of holding a Tier 4 visa is that foreign students must not work in certain jobs, for example professional sportsperson or sports coach.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with (a) the Scottish Rugby Union, (b) the Irish Rugby Football Union, (c) the Welsh Rugby Union and (d) the Rugby Football Union on the broadcasting of rugby union on free-to-air television.

I have had no such discussions with the Scottish Rugby Union, the Irish Rugby Football Union, the Welsh Rugby Union or the Rugby Football Union. The Government is clear that the existing list works well, and strikes the right balance between retaining free-to-air sports events for the public, and allowing rights holders to negotiate agreements in the best interests of their sport. The Government has no current plans of undertaking a review of the list, or of moving the Six Nations from the category B list to the category A list. As a Group B event, live coverage of the Six Nations Rugby tournament may be broadcast by a subscription television service provided that secondary coverage is offered to the eligible free-to-air broadcasters.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jan 2020
What plans the Government has to seek the consent of the Scottish Parliament to the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill.

The UK Government remains committed to the Sewel convention and the principle of legislative consent. The Secretary of State wrote to the Scottish Government on 18 December to seek their recommendation of consent for the Bill and has discussed this directly with Mike Russell.

I am disappointed that the Scottish Parliament voted against granting consent last week. We will continue to discuss the Bill with the Scottish Government.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what support his Department is providing to companies in the rail industry to export their goods to the EU.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) provides a wide range of support to companies in the rail industry exporting to the EU. Great.gov.uk provides comprehensive export guidance to businesses, including how to access export finance and insurance. DIT’s Infrastructure sector team engages with the rail supply chain to match UK capability to high value export opportunities, including through an infrastructure campaign for Europe. The department’s network of international trade advisers also help UK businesses participate in export activities.

Graham Stuart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish the total number of land and property acquisitions by High Speed Two (HS2) Ltd in connection with the development of London Euston station which were secured by (a) legal agreement with owners and (b) Compulsory Purchase Orders.

(a) Nine interests have been or are currently being acquired by legal agreement with owners.

(b) Ninety-five interests have been or are currently being acquired by Compulsory Purchase Orders.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many land and property transactions have been conducted as part of phase 1 of High Speed 2; and how many of those transactions are subject to Non-Disclosure Agreements on behalf of either party to the transaction.

In Phase One there have been 1,491 compensation payments made. Please note that an acquisitions case typically can have multiple payments associated with it.

HS2 Ltd does not as a matter of course ask for NDAs as default for its land and property acquisitions. For the programme as a whole, HS2 Ltd has over 400 specific confidentiality agreements but does not record/label the agreements as to whether they relate to land and property transactions or not.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 22 February 2021 to Question 153281, on High Speed 2 Railway Line, what the most costly (a) land and (b) property acquisition in Phase 1 of HS2 was, by cost.

The most costly land and property acquisition was the three buildings outside Euston station, being One Euston Square, One Eversholt Street -The Podium and One Eversholt Street - The Tower.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many court actions there have been in respect of Compulsory Purchase Orders against High Speed Two (HS2) Ltd in relation to Phase 1 of HS2; and what expenditure High Speed 2 (HS2) Ltd has incurred in (a) solicitors and (b) other legal costs in connection with those court actions.

There has been one determined High Court and Court of Appeal case arising out of a compulsory purchase notice served by HS2 Ltd. on behalf of the Secretary of State for Transport for Phase One of the HS2 Project. The court ruled in the Secretary of State’s favour.

There have been ten cases in which a reference has been made to the Upper Tribunal in respect of compensation entitlement as a result of compulsory purchase notices served by HS2 Ltd for Phase One of HS2.

There has been one case where HS2 Ltd. made a reference to the Upper Tribunal in respect of disputed compensation. All compensation cases have settled save for two, which are still ongoing.

There have been twelve Upper Tribunal references made by HS2 Ltd as a result of material detriment counter notices served on HS2 Ltd. requesting the Secretary of State acquires more land than the land referred to in the compulsory purchase notice. Only one has been heard in the Tribunal, with the rest all settling.

There have been seven Upper Tribunal references made in respect of blight notices rejected by the Secretary of State. Two of the references reached a full hearing in the Upper Tribunal (the other references being withdrawn).

Certificates of Appropriate Alternative Developments, Section 18 valuations and connected court cases have not been included in the above.

The information provided in this response has been identified from the information that is currently available to the Department.

Legal costs:

12 x Counter Notice References (a) £236,842 and (b) £51,754 (disbursements including Counsel fees)

10 x Compensation References (a) £1,258,393 and (b) £756, 968 (disbursements including Counsel fees)

2 x blight notices (a) £4,795.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the total costs incurred by High Speed Two of procuring professional advice for the estimates of costs to acquire property in connection with HS2 Phase 1 since 2009; if he will publish a list of the companies involved in that work.

Phase One Acquisition spend from Financial Year 2014/15 to 2020/21 is £41.5m; no earlier spend reported. Companies involved are: CBRE, Lambert Smith Hampton, Carter Jonas, Valuation Office Agency, Montagu Evans and Deloitte. These companies also rely on sub-contractors for various technical matters.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the economic effect of the covid-19 outbreak on (a) regional airports and (b) the Government's levelling up agenda.

The Government recognises the challenges faced by the aviation sector at this time. The Government is committed to maintaining critical connectivity and through policies like Public Service Obligations the Department for Transport subsidises routes into London.

We have also taken action to support airports through the Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme (AGOSS). This opened for applications on 29 January to provide support for eligible commercial airports and ground handlers in England. It will provide support up to the equivalent of their business rates liabilities or COVID-19 losses – whichever is lower – in the 2020/21 financial year, subject to certain conditions and a cap per claimant of £8m.

The Government is keen to find ways to work closely with the industry to ease restrictions on international travel gradually and sustainably. The Secretary of State for Transport will lead a successor to the Global Travel Taskforce to develop a framework that can facilitate greater travel when the time is right, while still managing the risk from imported cases and variants.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many meetings he has had with representatives of the aviation industry to discuss the planned aviation recovery package.

Since the onset of the pandemic, the Department for Transport has engaged very regularly with the industry, including through both Ministerial meetings and official led sessions.

As announced on 22nd February as part of the roadmap for the phased lifting of restrictions in England, the Secretary of State for Transport will also now lead a successor to the Global Travel Taskforce to develop a framework that can facilitate greater international travel when the time is right, while still managing the risk from imported cases and variants.

The government is also developing a forward looking strategic framework on the recovery of the sector, which we engage with the industry on and will publish later this year.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the severe downturn in the aviation industry due to the covid-19 outbreak on the wider economy.

Before Covid-19, aviation directly contributed at least £22 billion to GDP to the UK economy and supported around half a million jobs. This included the air transport and aerospace sectors, as well as the wider supply chain. Since the outbreak of Covid-19, the aviation sector has been one of the worst affected sectors in the UK. Passenger numbers at UK airports fell by 99% at the height of the pandemic. Overall volumes of flight traffic in the UK is currently around 80% below equivalent 2019 levels. The air transport sector’s contribution to the UK economy dropped by 74% in 2020 compared to 2019 and tens of thousands of redundancy notifications have been made. In addition to the direct impact to the UK air transport sector, the wider supply-chain and economy has also been adversely impacted by the severe reduction in air passenger demand, jobs and air connectivity, with impacts on consumer spending and investment across the rest of the economy.

The Department recognises the severe impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on travel, and work continues to understand how best the industry can be supported at this time. The Government is working on a strategic framework for the recovery of the sector. It will explore the return to growth of the aviation sector, and will include consideration of workforce and skills, regional connectivity, noise, innovation and regulation, and consumer issues.

Aviation businesses have access to the unprecedented economic support package that the Chancellor has put in place to help businesses to manage the challenges they are facing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In addition to this, the Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme (AGOSS) opened for applications on 29 January to provide support for eligible commercial airports and ground handlers in England.

In addition, through the Global Travel Taskforce, the Government will work closely with the industry to find ways to safely and gradually ease restrictions on international travel. We will set out more detail on this soon.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department plans to take to mitigate the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on regional airports.

The Department recognises the severe impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on travel, and work continues to understand how best the industry can be supported at this time.

Aviation businesses have access to the unprecedented economic support package that the Chancellor has put in place to help businesses to manage the challenges they are facing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Firms can continue to draw upon the package of measures announced by the Chancellor, including a Bank of England scheme for firms to raise capital, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, Time to Pay flexibilities with tax bills, financial support for employees including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and VAT deferrals.

In addition to this, the Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme (AGOSS) opened for applications on 29 January to provide support for eligible commercial airports and ground handlers in England. It will provide support up to the equivalent of their business rates liabilities or COVID-19 losses – whichever is lower – in the 2020/21 financial year, subject to certain conditions and a cap per claimant of £8m.

Through the Global Travel Taskforce, the Government will work closely with the industry to find ways to safely and gradually ease restrictions on international travel. We will set out more detail on this soon.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the loss of air routes in Europe on the UK’s ability to trade with Europe.

The new UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) does not place any restriction on air services between points in the UK and points in the EU, ensuring that UK-EU trade can continue to travel freely by air. Furthermore, the TCA recognises that, at their discretion, EU Member states may permit UK airlines to operate non-scheduled air services within and beyond the EU. The TCA also allows the UK and individual EU Member States to negotiate and agree a bilateral exchange of additional “5th Freedom” all-cargo rights. My officials are engaging closely with EU Member States and with industry on these matters.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his forecasts are for recovery and growth in the air transport and travel sector.

DfT has not produced economic forecasts of recovery and growth in the air transport or travel sectors. DfT maintain a capability to produce a range of passenger demand scenarios, reflecting the uncertainty surrounding the potential shape of recovery, for internal use.

The Department recognises the severe impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on travel, and work continues to understand how best the industry can be supported at this time. The Government is working on a strategic framework for the recovery of the sector. It will explore the return to growth of the aviation sector, and will include consideration of workforce and skills, regional connectivity, noise, innovation and regulation, and consumer issues.

Aviation businesses have access to the unprecedented economic support package that the Chancellor has put in place to help businesses to manage the challenges they are facing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In addition to this, the Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme (AGOSS) opened for applications on 29 January to provide support for eligible commercial airports and ground handlers in England.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he plans to take to support the aviation sector to increase connectivity to pre-covid-19 pandemic levels.

The Department recognises the severe impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on travel, and work continues to understand how best the industry can be supported at this time. The Government is working on a strategic framework for the recovery of the sector. It will explore the return to growth of the aviation sector, and will include consideration of workforce and skills, regional connectivity, noise, innovation and regulation, and consumer issues.

In addition, through the Global Travel Taskforce, the Government will work closely with the industry to find ways to safely and gradually ease restrictions on international travel. We will set out more detail on this soon.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to introduce an economic stimulus package to incentivise new air travel routes to be established after covid-19 travel restrictions are eased.

The Department recognises the severe impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on travel, and work continues to understand how best the industry can be supported at this time. The Government is working on a strategic framework for the recovery of the sector. It will explore the return to growth of the aviation sector, and will include consideration of workforce and skills, regional connectivity, noise, innovation and regulation, and consumer issues.

Aviation businesses have access to the unprecedented economic support package that the Chancellor has put in place to help businesses to manage the challenges they are facing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Firms can continue to draw upon the package of measures announced by the Chancellor, including a Bank of England scheme for firms to raise capital, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, Time to Pay flexibilities with tax bills, financial support for employees including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and VAT deferrals.

In addition to this, the Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme (AGOSS) opened for applications on 29 January to provide support for eligible commercial airports and ground handlers in England. It will provide support up to the equivalent of their business rates liabilities or COVID-19 losses – whichever is lower – in the 2020/21 financial year, subject to certain conditions and a cap per claimant of £8m.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many Compulsory Purchase Notices have been issued in relation to Phase 1 of High Speed Two; and what estimate he has made of the number that are still required for completion of Phase 1.

As of 31 January 2021, the Secretary of State for Transport has executed General Vesting Declarations (GVD) for permanent acquisition of 362 pieces of land or properties, by serving 4,060 notices on the interests in that land or those properties.

HS2 Ltd has 66.5 square kilometres (plus 2.2 square kilometres of subsoil) within act limits; reviewing and forecasting land requirements is an on-going process whilst design and construction plans continue.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the (a) total costs incurred to date and (b) total expenditure required for land and property acquisition in relation to Phase 1 of High Speed Two.

a) The costs incurred to date for land and property acquisition is £2,345 million. Within this £1,202 million is for Compulsory Purchase, £287 million for Schemes, £624 million through Private Agreement, and £232 million for Statutory Blight.

b) The final amount of compensation payable will be dependent on a number of factors including the take-up of discretionary schemes. HS2 Ltd is currently tracking to deliver its programme of acquisitions within the funding envelope agreed with the Department.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many claimants have been compensated by HS2 Ltd in relation to land and property interests affected by the route of Phase 1 of High Speed Two; and how many claimants' cases are estimated to be outstanding.

  • For Blight claims, 222 claimants have been compensated.

  • For Phase One non-statutory Schemes, 345 parties have been paid (Need to sell/ Exceptional Hardship/ Rural Support Zone)

  • For Phase 1 Access Licences, 1,552 claimants have received compensation

  • For Phase One Compulsory Purchase Order Claims, 1,002 claimants have received compensation, from 2,742 total separate payments.

Until the final number of notices have been served, and the claims received, the final number is not possible to forecast.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what area of land has been acquired to date by HS2 Ltd for purposes connected to Phase 1 of High Speed Two; and what estimate has been made of the area of land that remains required to be acquired by HS2 Ltd for the same purpose.

The High Speed Rail (London – West Midlands) Act 2017 identifies an area of 66.5 square kilometres plus 2.2 square kilometres of subsoil which may be acquired or possessed for the purposes of building the railway from London to Birmingham. As at the end of January 2021, 26.45 square kilometres have been acquired under permanent acquisition powers, and 26.76 square kilometres are currently being occupied under temporary possession powers. Reviewing and forecasting land requirements is an on-going process whilst design and construction planning continues.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with his EU counterparts on the transportation of equipment for (a) music, (b) entertainment and (c) sport into the EU under the terms of the EU-UK Trade and Co-operation Agreement.

Market access arrangements for hauliers transporting equipment for cultural events was discussed regularly during negotiations between the UK and the EU, and they are subject to the provisions in the Trade and Co-operation Agreement (TCA). During UK-EU negotiations, the UK put forward proposals for an exemption for specialist hauliers carrying out tours for cultural events, but the EU did not agree to our ask.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to review the driver welfare provisions of Operations (a) Stack and (b) Brock; and if he will make a statement.

The provision of driver welfare in Operations Stack and Brock is the responsibility of the Kent Resilience Forum. In the event of significant disruption on the M20, the Kent Resilience Forum may take the decision to activate their Driver Welfare Plan, which includes the proportionate distribution of welfare at the roadside. Both the Department and the KRF monitor the situation closely and have the capability to increase the provision of welfare depending on the scale of demand, as demonstrated by the response to the extreme traffic disruption that occurred over the Christmas period as a result of France closing the border.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the average length of delay at the border to hauliers exporting to the EU under the terms of the new trade deal with the EU compared to customs union membership.

Now the that transition period has ended EU authorities require additional paperwork and checks when goods are moved from the UK to the EU. Border readiness checks are undertaken both in the EU and within the UK (to ensure that freight can enter the EU after it has left the UK). These additional checks take time and there will inevitably be a certain proportion that are not border ready (i.e. have the correct documentation), which may result in some disruption. DfT analysis has focused on a Reasonable Worst Case Scenario for planning purposes, which can be found here. Note that this is not an estimate but a scenario used for contingency planning purposes. As yet it is too early to use observed data to provide an estimate, as freight volumes have been low, as they usually are in early January.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many of the nine freedoms of the air the UK aviation sector enjoyed as an EU member the UK will retain after the end of the transition period.

Following the end of the Transition Period, all existing UK airlines are able to continue flying between the UK and the EU, including overflights and technical stops – the first four freedoms of the air.

The UK and individual EU Member States may also negotiate additional so-called fifth freedom rights for all-cargo carriers and may permit additional flexibilities for non-scheduled services.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to his Department's guidance, Temporary relaxation of the enforcement of the EU drivers' hours rules: delivery of essential items to retailers, published on 10 December 2020 to be applicable for the period between 10 December and 30 December 2020, how many notification of relaxation forms his Department received; and whether he plans to extend the period of relaxed enforcement of those rules.

The Department has received 90 notifications from operators indicating that they would be using the temporary relaxation of the enforcement of the EU drivers’ hours rules. The Department has not yet received the final notifications from all these operators about whether or not the relaxation was actually used. The relaxation ended on 30 December 2020 and there are no plans to extend this further given the current situation.

However, two separate and different relaxations of the enforcement of the EU drivers’ hours rules were granted (which both began on 23 December 2020 and will end on 22 January 2021). One is for the general haulage of goods in Great Britain and the other is for the international carriage of goods by road, related to substantial delays to border crossings. Details can be found on the gov.uk website.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has made for the UK's continued participation in the European Conference of Ministers of Transport's haulage permit scheme after the end of the transition period.

The UK Government will remain a member of the European Conference of Ministers for Transport (ECMT) regime after the transition period as it is a multilateral agreement independent of the European Union.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions his Department has had with the EU Aviation Safety Agency on the establishment and operation of mutual travel without quarantine as a result of covid-19 between the UK and agency member states.

Since leaving the EU on 31st of January 2020, the UK no longer participates in EASA meetings. The Department for Transport has not discussed with any member state the possibility of mutual travel without the requirement for quarantine.

8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish the draft criteria formulated as a result of his Departments discussions on mutual travel between the UK and European Union Aviation Safety Agency member states that do not require quarantine as a result of the covid-19 pandemic.

Since leaving the EU on 31st of January 2020, the UK no longer participates in EASA meetings. The Department for Transport has not discussed with any member state the possibility of mutual travel without the requirement for quarantine.

13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with representatives of the tourism industry on consumer protection and industry obligations to refund journeys cancelled as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises the challenges consumers and businesses are experiencing regarding refunds for cancelled holidays and flights. In particular, we appreciate the frustration consumers may be experiencing. The government’s position is clear - if a customer asks for a refund, that refund needs to be paid. The Department for Transport is in regular conversation with UK airlines and is working with the wider sector, the regulator and consumer groups to help ensure airlines deliver on their commitments.

13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on ensuring the financial viability of the UK transport industry during the covid-19 outbreak.

DfT has been engaging with a range of transport industry sectors to understand and monitor the impact of Covid-19. The Chancellor has set out an unprecedented range of support measures for businesses across the economy that the transport industry can access. This includes schemes to raise capital, flexibilities with tax bills, and financial support for employees.

We have discussed and agreed with HMT appropriate support to ensure continuation of key services. This includes services to support key workers and essential freight capacity. We have suspended normal rail franchise agreements and transferred all revenue and cost risk to the government for a limited period to safeguard minimum rail services. On Maritime Freight Capacity, support for operators on key routes across the Irish Sea (up to 5 routes) and GB-mainland Europe (up to 26 routes, incl. Eurotunnel). We have committed to funding worth almost £400 million to protect bus services for people who need to make essential journeys.

Any business that continues to experience financial distress after taking advantage of the cross-economy schemes and implementing all possible self-help measure can apply for bespoke support. This additional bespoke support is treated as the last resort.

We are continuing to discuss the support that may be required as we enter the restart and recovery phase of the Covid outbreak.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions his Department has had with the Confederation for Passenger Transport on the UK coach industry and the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on coach operators.

Ministers and officials have had regular meetings with the Confederation for Passenger Transport in recent weeks to discuss a wide range of matters. The Government has launched an unprecedented set of support measures to ensure that businesses, such as coach operators, have access to the funds they need to pay essential bills at this difficult time. This includes the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, which has been extended until the end of October. Officials are engaging with both MHCLG and HMT to understand what the ongoing risks and issues are for the coach sector, and how these could be addressed.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with representatives of the road haulage industry on (a) the operation of road haulage during the covid-19 pandemic and (b) the financial position of that industry.

Ministers and officials at the Department are in regular contact with representatives of the road haulage industry, including the Road Haulage Association and the Freight Transport Association, to understand the issues the industry is experiencing as a result of COVID-19, including operational and financial matters. The Department is working with the industry to ensure that the appropriate measures are in place to allow for the continued operation of the road freight sector during the pandemic, and to identify barriers to accessing the available Government support measures.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions his Department has had with Ernst & Young in their role as administrators of Flybe Limited on arrangements to access the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Where a company, such as Flybe, is being taken under the management of an administrator, it would be a matter for the administrator if employees are able to access the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. However, we would expect an administrator would only access the scheme if there is a reasonable likelihood of rehiring the workers.

12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions his Department has had with the (a) Freight Transport Association, (b) Road Haulage Association and (c) British Pipeline Agency on maintaining continuity of (i) petroleum and (ii) diesel supplies in the event of a public health emergency.

I refer the hon Member to the answer given by my hon. Friend the Minister of State for Business, Energy and Clean Growth on 18th March 2020 to Question 28666.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect on CO² emissions of making permanent the longer semi-trailer trial that is scheduled to end in 2027.

As set out in the summary report of the longer semi-trailer trial for the year 2018, published on 2 March 2020, the net emissions reduction from the trial to date is around 37,000 tonnes of CO2 equivalent.

The extent to which these savings would be achieved outside of the current trial setting would depend on the commercial appetite for using longer semi-trailers and the regulatory regime put in place.

The future of the longer semi-trailer trial is currently under consideration.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department plans to support the installation of liquid (a) petroleum gas and (b) natural gas refuelling stations on the road network.

The Department currently has no plans to support the installation of liquid petroleum gas and natural gas refuelling stations on the road network.

Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG) has a well-established refuelling network across the UK; it is reported at https://www.filllpg.co.uk/ that there are 1,937 confirmed stations.

There is an established refuelling network for Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) within the UK for HGVs, which are the only road vehicles currently utilising LNG as an alternative fuel in the UK. Industry have advised that they have plans in support of the creation of new refuelling points across the strategic road network, should demand for LNG increase.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to publish the third year (a) interim and (b) final reports on the evaluation of the national HGV speed limit increase in England and Wales.

The final report of the evaluation of the national HGV speed limit increase in England and Wales (which will include Year three findings) will be published shortly. The interim reports have been published.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of increasing the weight limits for HGVs engaged in freight movements to and from multimodal rail terminals to 48 tonnes.

The Department is assessing industry proposals to increase the maximum authorised weights of HGVs involved in multi-modal journeys to 48 tonnes and hence make rail movements more competitive. There are significant environmental and economic benefits to a trial of such a proposal, but there are cost and feasibility issues related to infrastructure strengthening and road wear.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions officials in his Department have had with representatives of (a) the National Police Chiefs’ Council, (b) Police Scotland, (c) the Home Office, (d) the Scottish Government and (e) the Trades Union Congress on the regulation of unlicensed contractor delivery drivers.

All drivers are required to hold a valid licence for the type of vehicle they operate. For drivers who operate vehicles over 7.5 tonnes, an additional 35 hours of periodic training is required every 5 years to maintain their Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC). Drivers must have the full Driver CPC if they drive a lorry, bus or coach as the main part of their employment

There is no additional licencing scheme for delivery drivers beyond the driving licence. No discussions on such a scheme have taken place.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions officials in his Department have had with representatives of the (a) Scottish Trades Unions Congress, (b) Trades Union Congress and (c) Health and Safety Executive on the health and safety of contractor drivers operating light goods vehicles.

There have been no recent discussions about this specific topic. The Department does hold regular working level discussions with the Health & Safety Executive.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions officials in his Department have had with officials in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on (a) employment status and (b) contract obligations of light goods vehicle drivers who are employed as contractors.

There have been no recent discussions about these specific topics.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to require operators of commercial light goods vehicles to display livery identifying the (a) driver, (b) operating contractor and (c) place of business on those vehicles.

We have no plans to mandate that light goods vehicles are liveried to identify the driver, contractor or place of business. This would impose costs on small businesses and the light vehicle rental sector. It would also not be suitable for many commercial light goods vehicles, such as those used for more than one contract, driven by multiple drivers or on short term leases.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on extending the apprenticeship levy to the road haulage industry.

All employers with an annual pay bill over £3 million pay the apprenticeship levy. This includes road haulage operators.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Education on the operation of the apprenticeship levy.

The Secretary of State has discussed with the Secretary of State for Education issues raised by the transport sector regarding the training that attracts levy funding, the creation of apprenticeship standards, the funding levels attached to them and the availability of training providers and end point assessors.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with representatives of the Association of British Insurers on insurance cover provided to contractor drivers.

There have been no recent discussions with the Association of British Insurers on insurance cover provided to contractor drivers.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to promote the transport sector as a career to young women.

Improving gender balance in the sector is vital if we are to address skills challenges and support businesses to benefit from building a broader pool of talent. Building skills in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths is a fundamental part of this, as many jobs in the sector require these skills.

The Department for Transport is leading efforts to promote the exciting training and career opportunities in the transport sector to under-represented groups. These include:

  • The Transport Infrastructure Skills Strategy 2016 set stretching ambitions for apprentice starts and increasing diversity within the sector including for women to represent 20% of technology and engineering apprenticeship starts. The most recent Annual Report ‘Three Years of Progress’ published on 11th July 2019 set out that:

  • 15.4% of technical and engineering roles are female, making good progress to STAT’s ambition of 20% and up from 3% in 2015.

  • We are seeing a higher proportion of women at higher levels of training. 27% of all degree level apprenticeship starts were female in 2018/19.

  • 23.6% of women undertake apprenticeships in the sector.

  • An aviation programme ‘Reach for the Sky’ launched in October 2019, with the aim of making the aviation industry diverse, inclusive and accessible to all, with a focus on encouraging the next generation into the sector. The Department has appointed eleven ‘Aviation Ambassadors’, a group of outstanding aviation industry role models, who will work to inspire the next generation to take up aviation careers, champion diversity and social mobility within the industry, and develop initiatives to tackle barriers to aviation careers.

  • The maritime sector has improved gender balance through the creation of a Women in Maritime Taskforce, committing maritime companies to act upon a Pledge and Charter.

  • In 2017, DfT’s Rail Strategic Vision set out a commitment to use franchise competitions to support a range of measures to improve diversity of the workforce including how the franchisee will attract young people into rail and address underrepresentation of women across all levels and grades. The Rail Sector Deal set out plans to improve the diversity of the sector.

  • The Department for Transport led a cross-government campaign to promote engineering to young people, including under-represented groups, through 2018’s successful Year of Engineering campaign. The Department now works in partnership with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and the Department for Education (DfE) to support the Engineering: Take a Closer Look legacy campaign, aimed at 13-16 year olds. This includes promoting engineering in transport, working with schools and the Girl Guides through design challenges and production of a booklet acknowledging aspirational female engineers from the transport sector.

  • The Department’s Ministerial team and Permanent Secretary hosted a Women in Transport event to bring senior leaders from across industry together to tackle gender diversity issues on Monday 2nd March and drive a co-ordinated sector response to International Women’s Day on 8th March 2020.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions officials in his Department have had with representatives from the EU, on the maintenance of the Trans-European Transport Network after the transition period.

There have been no recent discussions with EU representatives on the maintenance of the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) after the transition period.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what powers he has to (a) suspend and (b) amend transport services in the event of a public health emergency.

The Secretary of State may make Regulations under the Public Health (Control of Disease) Act 1984, to take measures to prevent the spread of disease or threats to public health arising from the arrival or departure of any “vessel, aircraft, train or other conveyance”. This regulation making power is sufficiently broad so as to suspend or amend transport services in the event that they pose a sufficient threat to public health or the spread of disease. Any powers relating to international travel would need to be exercised in accordance with the United Kingdom’s international obligations. The powers apply to England and Wales and the Secretary of State may make regulations which apply to England. Welsh Government Ministers may choose to make regulations applicable to Wales. Scotland and Northern Ireland have their own legislative provisions.

16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has had discussions with the (a) Scottish and (b) Welsh Governments on section 17 of the Bus Services Act 2017; and if he will make a statement.

Section 17 of the Bus Services Act 2017 provides powers for the secretary of state to require the provision of audible and visible information on board local bus services throughout Great Britain. In exercising their powers the Secretary of State must consult with both Scottish and Welsh Ministers.

Officials engaged with their Scottish and Welsh counterparts during the development of the policy proposals put to consultation in summer 2018, and both devolved administrations were invited to respond formally. We will continue to engage with the devolved administrations in finalising the policy and bringing forward Regulations.

16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress he has made in drafting the regulations to be laid before the House under section 17 of the Bus Services Act 2017.

In Summer 2018 the Government published a public consultation on proposals to require the provision of accessible on-board information on local bus services throughout Great Britain.

We are currently finalizing our response to the consultation and expect to announce our next steps regarding the making of Regulations and publication of guidance later in the year.

16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Answers of 23 May 2019 to Questions 256382 and 256383 on Bus Services: Disability, what progress he has made in the provision of audio-visual announcements on bus services under section 17 of the Bus Services Act 2017.

In Summer 2018 the Government published a public consultation on proposals to require the provision of accessible on-board information on local bus services throughout Great Britain.

We are currently finalizing our response to the consultation and expect to announce our next steps regarding the making of Regulations and publication of guidance later in the year.

16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he is taking steps to ensure that the proposals on rail industry data collection and sharing in the Williams Rail Review’s evidence paper, entitled Rail in the future transport system, are introduced to improve access to information on accessibility across the rail network; and if he will make a statement.

The Government will publish a White Paper on the recommendations of the Williams Review early this year, including those relating to data. The White Paper will include proposals to improve access for disabled passengers to the network.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Office of Rail and Road on the provision of data on accessibility at facilities covered by that Office's supervisory and regulatory functions.

The Department for Transport engages with the Office of Rail and Road on issues regarding the accessibility of the rail network including the importance of reliable and up-to-date accessibility information. The Williams Rail Review will shortly come forward with proposals to improve access for disabled passengers to the network.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions his Department has had with the Rail Delivery Group (RDG) on the provision of data on accessibility at railway stations operated by RDG member organisations under the terms of the Open Government Licence.

The Department for Transport regularly engages with the Rail Delivery Group on how we can work together to make the rail network more accessible for disabled people and those with additional needs, including the provision of up to date information of accessible facilities on trains and at stations. However, this is not done under the terms of the Open Government License.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Scottish Government on the introduction of E10 petrol to the UK market.

The Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO) has been successful in promoting a market for sustainable renewable fuels. Building on that success, the Government nearly doubled targets for supply from 2018 to 2020 and set further targets out to 2032, providing investment certainty. Reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from low carbon fuels supplied in transport under the RTFO are important in the delivery of savings required to meet UK carbon budgets. The trade of low carbon fuels and feedstocks is global and we will continue to engage with counterparts internationally, including with our colleagues in the EU.

The Government has made significant progress in relation to policy on E10 and we will publish our response to the call for evidence on E10, as well as next steps, as soon as possible. The Department has been in regular consultation with officials from the Scottish Government in developing this policy, which could benefit the whole of the United Kingdom.

16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Answer of 23 May 2019 to Question 292315 on Biofuels, what progress his Department has made in publishing its response to the consultation, entitled E10 petrol, consumer protection and fuel pump labelling, on the introduction of E10 fuels to the UK market.

The Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO) has been successful in promoting a market for sustainable renewable fuels. Building on that success, the Government nearly doubled targets for supply from 2018 to 2020 and set further targets out to 2032, providing investment certainty. Reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from low carbon fuels supplied in transport under the RTFO are important in the delivery of savings required to meet UK carbon budgets. The trade of low carbon fuels and feedstocks is global and we will continue to engage with counterparts internationally, including with our colleagues in the EU.

The Government has made significant progress in relation to policy on E10 and we will publish our response to the call for evidence on E10, as well as next steps, as soon as possible. The Department has been in regular consultation with officials from the Scottish Government in developing this policy, which could benefit the whole of the United Kingdom.

16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the EU on the continued implementation of the provisions of the Renewable Transport Fuels Obligation Order 2007 as amended after the UK leaves the EU.

The Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO) has been successful in promoting a market for sustainable renewable fuels. Building on that success, the Government nearly doubled targets for supply from 2018 to 2020 and set further targets out to 2032, providing investment certainty. Reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from low carbon fuels supplied in transport under the RTFO are important in the delivery of savings required to meet UK carbon budgets. The trade of low carbon fuels and feedstocks is global and we will continue to engage with counterparts internationally, including with our colleagues in the EU.

The Government has made significant progress in relation to policy on E10 and we will publish our response to the call for evidence on E10, as well as next steps, as soon as possible. The Department has been in regular consultation with officials from the Scottish Government in developing this policy, which could benefit the whole of the United Kingdom.

28th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 23 March 2020 to Question 29272, what progress she has made in her discussions with the Isle of Man Government on the Flybe pension scheme.

It would not be appropriate for a UK Minister to comment on cases that are a matter for the Isle of Man Government, the Isle of Man Financial Services Authority or the independent Pensions Regulator. Members wishing to receive updates should contact the Scheme Administrator or the Isle of Man Government.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions she has had with the (a) representatives of the Isle of Man Government and (b) the administrators of Flybe Limited, on the outstanding pension liabilities of Flybe Limited (in Administration).

The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions has engaged with the Isle of Man Government to enquire how they plan to work with Flybe and regulators to support pension scheme members. The Secretary of State has not engaged with the administrators of Flybe Limited.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the financial effect on the Exchequer of reduced income from the travel sector during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises the challenging circumstances facing the travel sector as a result of Covid-19, and firms experiencing difficulties can draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor, including schemes to raise capital, flexibilities with tax bills and the extended furlough scheme.

As set out in the Covid-19 Impact Assessment last November, the Government cannot forecast with confidence the precise impact of specific changes to restrictions, including those on the travel sector, as this will depend on a broad range of factors which are, in many cases, difficult to estimate.

The Treasury does not prepare forecasts for the UK economy and public finances, these are the responsibility of the independent Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR). The OBR’s latest forecast (March 3) highlighted that

the economic impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic and the unprecedented fiscal support has caused significant but necessary increase in borrowing and debt.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many meetings he has had with representatives of the aviation industry to discuss the planned aviation recovery package.

The Chancellor speaks to industry representatives on a regular basis about a range of matters.

The Government recognises the challenging circumstances facing the aviation industry as a result of Covid-19 and firms experiencing difficulties can draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor, including schemes to raise capital and flexibilities with tax bills. In addition to economy-wide measures such as the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, the aerospace sector and its aviation customers are being supported with almost £11 billion made available through loan guarantees, support for exporters, the Bank of England’s Covid Corporate Financing Facility and grants for research and development. This includes £8bn of guarantees provided by UK Export Finance.

In addition, the Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme launched on 29 January 2021 will provide support for eligible businesses, up to the equivalent of their business rates liabilities in the 2020/21 financial year, subject to certain conditions and a cap per claimant of £8m. This will help companies with their fixed costs and could unlock shareholder and lender support.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the potential merits of introducing an aviation recovery package.

The Chancellor regularly discusses a wide range of matters related to economic recovery with Cabinet colleagues.

The Government recognises the challenging circumstances facing the aviation industry as a result of Covid-19 and firms experiencing difficulties can draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor, including schemes to raise capital and flexibilities with tax bills. In addition to economy-wide measures such as the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, the aerospace sector and its aviation customers are being supported with almost £11 billion made available through loan guarantees, support for exporters, the Bank of England’s Covid Corporate Financing Facility and grants for research and development. This includes £8bn of guarantees provided by UK Export Finance.

In addition, the Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme launched on 29 January 2021 will provide support for eligible businesses, up to the equivalent of their business rates liabilities in the 2020/21 financial year, subject to certain conditions and a cap per claimant of £8m. This will help companies with their fixed costs and could unlock shareholder and lender support.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions his Department has had with professional accountancy bodies on the health implications for accountants and other allied professions in meeting HMRC deadlines for tax returns.

The Government understands the considerable pressures that the accountancy and other allied professions have been under in the past year, and that they have helped deliver the economic response to the pandemic, while at the same time suffering the effects of the pandemic on their own firms. The Government is very grateful to them for their valuable work.

HMRC have had constructive engagement with the professional bodies representing tax agents, and Jim Harra, HMRC’s First Permanent Secretary and Chief Executive, has personally written to them in response to their letters drawing his attention to the pressures their members are under.

HMRC are encouraging as many people as possible to file on time, even if they cannot pay their tax in full straight away, but they have also announced on 25 January that Self-Assessment taxpayers who file online by 28 February will not receive a late filing penalty.

Not charging late filing penalties for late filed Self-Assessment returns submitted online in February will give both taxpayers and accountants breathing space to complete and file their returns without the added worry of receiving a penalty.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of removing the £100 default penalty for late tax returns during periods of covid-19 restrictions on working practices.

The Government and HMRC recognise the considerable pressure that many taxpayers and their accountants are facing at present, and that some of those taxpayers will not be able to file their return by 31 January.

HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) announced on Monday 25 January that Self-Assessment (SA) taxpayers will not receive a penalty for filing their SA return late provided they file it online by 28 February 2021.

This is not an extension of the deadline and taxpayers’ other SA obligations remain the same, including the obligation to pay their SA liability by 31 January.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of scale rate expenses for accommodation and subsistence paid to cabin crew and other employees who travel outside of the UK.

The Overseas Scale Rates (OSR) guidance was last updated in February 2019 and applied from 6 April 2019.

The published rates are designed to reflect the average cost of subsistence, including local taxes and gratuities, when staying overseas. This will, of course, vary from case to case as well as city to city.

Employers can pay or reimburse employees’ allowable travel expenses free of tax and National Insurance contributions in two ways. They can pay the actual expenses or use the scale rates HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) set. If they pay the actual expenses, they must check the employee’s receipts, but do not have to do this if they use the scale rates.

If an employee spends more than the amount their employer pays, they can claim tax relief on the difference. Guidance on how to do this can be found at: www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-income-tax-relief-for-your-employment-expenses-p87.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of scale rate expenses for accommodation and subsistence paid to airline cabin crew and other employees who travel outside of the UK.

The Overseas Scale Rates (OSR) guidance was last updated in February 2019 and applied from 6 April 2019.

The published rates are designed to reflect the average cost of subsistence, including local taxes and gratuities, when staying overseas. This will, of course, vary from case to case as well as city to city.

Employers can pay or reimburse employees’ allowable travel expenses free of tax and National Insurance contributions in two ways. They can pay the actual expenses or use the scale rates HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) set. If they pay the actual expenses, they must check the employee’s receipts, but do not have to do this if they use the scale rates.

If an employee spends more than the amount their employer pays, they can claim tax relief on the difference. Guidance on how to do this can be found at: www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-income-tax-relief-for-your-employment-expenses-p87.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the number of businesses that are prepared for the completion of customs paperwork for export to the EU.

The Government has been working for over a year to help businesses to understand and prepare for their new obligations, including customs paperwork for export to the EU.

The Government undertook significant readiness activity prior to 1 January, identifying key customer groups and delivering a high volume of targeted communications and engagement, including sending over 11 million letters and emails and hosting 50 webinars with over 30,000 attendees to date, preparing businesses for the new rules.

Through the cross-Government campaign since August the Government has reached 41m adults (15+) and 16m business decision makers through radio, and 18m adults (15+) and 3.5m business decision makers through print and digital articles, promoting key readiness messaging for importers and exporters.

The Government will continue to assess carefully how traders are adapting to the new customs arrangements over the next few weeks and months.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many customs officials were employed by HMRC on (a) 30 September 2020, (b) 31 October 2020, (c) 30 November 2020 and (d) 31 December 2020.

HMRC are unable to provide the information requested as HMRC do not categorise employees as “customs officials”.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the funding and financing package agreed between his Department and Transport for London announced on 1 November 2020, what assessment he has made of the effect of comparability factors on the allocation of funding to (a) Scotland, (b) Wales and (c) Northern Ireland.

To?give the devolved administrations the upfront certainty to plan and deliver their coronavirus response,?we have guaranteed they will receive at least £16bn in additional resource funding this year on top of their Spring Budget?funding.

Any additional funding provided to the Department for Transport to support Transport for London will result in Barnett consequentials for the devolved administrations and these will contribute towards the guaranteed funding.

Where additional funding is being provided to departments in-year, the devolved administrations generally receive consequential funding using programme comparability rather than overall departmental comparability. Given local transport is devolved in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, a comparability factor of 100% will be applied as set out in the Statement of Funding Policy.

The Treasury is currently working with the devolved administrations to update and publish comparability factors in a revised Statement of Funding Policy alongside the upcoming Spending Review.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions the Government has had with (a) the Scottish Government, (b) the Welsh Government and (c) the Northern Ireland Executive on the disbursement of Barnett consequentials resulting from the extraordinary funding and financing package for Transport for London announced on 1 November 2020.

Any additional funding provided to the Department for Transport to support Transport for London will result in Barnett consequentials for the devolved administrations.

As is the normal process,?changes to departmental and devolved administrations’ funding will be confirmed at Supplementary Estimates.

Therefore, to?give the devolved administrations the upfront certainty to plan and deliver their coronavirus response,?we have guaranteed they will receive at least £14bn in additional funding this year on top of their Spring Budget?funding. This means a total increase this year of at least £7.2bn for the Scottish Government, £4.4 billion for the Welsh Government, and £2.4 bn for the Northern Ireland Executive.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions his Department had with representatives of the aviation industry regarding tax-free sales at UK airports to non-EU nationals after the closure of his Department's consultation that matter.

Ahead of the end of the transition period, the Government has announced the VAT and excise duty treatment of goods purchased by individuals for personal use and carried in their luggage to or from Great Britain. The following rules will apply from 1 January 2021:

- Passengers travelling from Great Britain to any destination outside the United Kingdom will be able to purchase duty-free excise goods once they have passed security controls at ports, airports, and international rail stations.

- Personal allowances will apply to passengers entering Great Britain from a destination outside of the United Kingdom, with alcohol allowances significantly increased.

- The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales of non-excise goods and the VAT Retail Export Scheme will not be extended to passengers travelling to the EU, and will be withdrawn for all passengers.

The Government published a consultation which ran from 11 March to 20 May. During this time the Government held a number of virtual meetings with stakeholders to hear their views and received 73 responses to the consultation. The Government has also continued to meet and discuss with key stakeholders following the announcement of these policies.

The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales currently affects airports that fly to non-EU destinations. The extension of duty-free sales to EU bound passengers will be a significant boost to all airports in England, Scotland and Wales, including Glasgow Airport and smaller regional airports which have not been able to offer duty-free before.

The final costing will be subject to scrutiny by the independent Office for Budget Responsibility and will be set out at the next forecast.

The Government also recognises the challenges the aviation sector is facing as it recovers from the impacts of Covid-19 and has supported the sector throughout the pandemic, and continues to do so, including schemes to raise capital, flexibilities with tax bills, and financial support for employees.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on employment levels of the proposed ending in January 2021 of tax-free sales in airports to travellers to non-EU countries.

Ahead of the end of the transition period, the Government has announced the VAT and excise duty treatment of goods purchased by individuals for personal use and carried in their luggage to or from Great Britain. The following rules will apply from 1 January 2021:

- Passengers travelling from Great Britain to any destination outside the United Kingdom will be able to purchase duty-free excise goods once they have passed security controls at ports, airports, and international rail stations.

- Personal allowances will apply to passengers entering Great Britain from a destination outside of the United Kingdom, with alcohol allowances significantly increased.

- The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales of non-excise goods and the VAT Retail Export Scheme will not be extended to passengers travelling to the EU, and will be withdrawn for all passengers.

The Government published a consultation which ran from 11 March to 20 May. During this time the Government held a number of virtual meetings with stakeholders to hear their views and received 73 responses to the consultation. The Government has also continued to meet and discuss with key stakeholders following the announcement of these policies.

The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales currently affects airports that fly to non-EU destinations. The extension of duty-free sales to EU bound passengers will be a significant boost to all airports in England, Scotland and Wales, including Glasgow Airport and smaller regional airports which have not been able to offer duty-free before.

The final costing will be subject to scrutiny by the independent Office for Budget Responsibility and will be set out at the next forecast.

The Government also recognises the challenges the aviation sector is facing as it recovers from the impacts of Covid-19 and has supported the sector throughout the pandemic, and continues to do so, including schemes to raise capital, flexibilities with tax bills, and financial support for employees.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the change in tax revenues as a result of the proposed ending of tax-free sales at airports to travellers to non-EU destinations.

Ahead of the end of the transition period, the Government has announced the VAT and excise duty treatment of goods purchased by individuals for personal use and carried in their luggage to or from Great Britain. The following rules will apply from 1 January 2021:

- Passengers travelling from Great Britain to any destination outside the United Kingdom will be able to purchase duty-free excise goods once they have passed security controls at ports, airports, and international rail stations.

- Personal allowances will apply to passengers entering Great Britain from a destination outside of the United Kingdom, with alcohol allowances significantly increased.

- The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales of non-excise goods and the VAT Retail Export Scheme will not be extended to passengers travelling to the EU, and will be withdrawn for all passengers.

The Government published a consultation which ran from 11 March to 20 May. During this time the Government held a number of virtual meetings with stakeholders to hear their views and received 73 responses to the consultation. The Government has also continued to meet and discuss with key stakeholders following the announcement of these policies.

The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales currently affects airports that fly to non-EU destinations. The extension of duty-free sales to EU bound passengers will be a significant boost to all airports in England, Scotland and Wales, including Glasgow Airport and smaller regional airports which have not been able to offer duty-free before.

The final costing will be subject to scrutiny by the independent Office for Budget Responsibility and will be set out at the next forecast.

The Government also recognises the challenges the aviation sector is facing as it recovers from the impacts of Covid-19 and has supported the sector throughout the pandemic, and continues to do so, including schemes to raise capital, flexibilities with tax bills, and financial support for employees.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the change in tax revenues originating from aviation and aerospace-related activities in (a) 2020-21 and (b) the next three financial years.

Forecasts of future receipts are produced by the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) on a regular basis as part of their Economic and Fiscal Outlook series. The Chancellor of the Exchequer has asked the OBR to prepare an economic and fiscal forecast to be published in November.

Air Passenger Duty (APD) is the UK’s principal tax on the aviation sector. The OBR’s Fiscal Sustainability Report, published in July, has estimated APD receipts over the next five financial years under various scenarios. Under the central scenario, the OBR estimated that APD would raise: £1.3bn in 2020-21; £3.7bn in 2021-22; £3.8bn in 2022-23; £3.9bn in 2023-24 and; £4.1bn on 2024-25. The report acknowledges that these figures are “hugely uncertain”.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions have taken place between Ministers in his Department and representatives of Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd and Virgin Atlantic International Ltd on the operation and employment practices of Virgin Atlantic and any potential financial support available to that airline.

Treasury Ministers and officials meet with a wide range of stakeholders across sectors as part of ongoing policy development and implementation.

Ministers and officials from the Department for Transport are in regular contact with airlines, airports and unions to understand the impact that COVID-19 is having on the sector and its workers.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the Barnett consequentials as a result of grant funding and loans provided by his Department to Transport for London during the covid-19 outbreak.

The UK government has agreed a £1.6 billion funding and financing package for Transport for London to protect key services. This is comprised of £1.095 billion of grant funding from the Department for Transport and a £505 million PWLB loan.

As a result of this package, the devolved administrations will receive over £200 million of additional funding: over £100 million for the Scottish Government, £65 million for the Welsh Government, and over £35 million for the Northern Ireland Executive.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether workers who had their hours of work cut in response to the covid-19 outbreak prior to the announcement of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme will be eligible for support at the rate of pay commensurate with the original number of hours worked.

The Government seeks, as far as possible, to protect people’s jobs and incomes. This is an unprecedented jobs retention scheme and the Government has been working hard to set out further details on the scheme. The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is open to any individual who was on an employer’s PAYE payroll on 19 March 2020. Full details can be found in the guidance available at www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-for-wage-costs-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme and www.gov.uk/guidance/work-out-80-of-your-employees-wages-to-claim-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme, which provides answers to these questions.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether there is a minimum number of hours worked per calendar week for an employee to be considered a furloughed worker for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

The Government seeks, as far as possible, to protect people’s jobs and incomes. This is an unprecedented jobs retention scheme and the Government has been working hard to set out further details on the scheme. The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is open to any individual who was on an employer’s PAYE payroll on 19 March 2020. Full details can be found in the guidance available at www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-for-wage-costs-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme and www.gov.uk/guidance/work-out-80-of-your-employees-wages-to-claim-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme, which provides answers to these questions.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 12 March 2020 to Question 25141, on Sports Competitors: Visas, if she will publish the list of recognised sports governing bodies.

The list of Sports Governing Bodies is already available online at Appendix M of the Immigration Rules: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/immigration-rules/immigration-rules-appendix-m-sports-governing-bodies.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with representatives of (a) the Scottish Football Association, (b) Scottish Women's Football and (c) the Scottish Women's Premier League since 1 January 2019 on the effect of Tier 4 visa regulations on football in Scotland.

Tier 4 visas have restrictions imposed regarding what work can be undertaken during the period leave. One of the conditions of holding a Tier 4 visa is that students must not engage in Professional sport.

The definitions of amateur and professional sports persons contained in the immigration rules were established following full consultation with all our Sports Governing Bodies, including the Scottish Football Association, the representative body for football in Scotland. The Home Office routinely engages with our Sports Governing Bodies and other governmental departments regarding the immigration requirements for professional sport.

The immigration system makes specific provision for professional sportspersons to come to the UK. These provisions seek to strike a balance between enabling UK sports teams to access top class international talent and protecting development opportunities for home grown sportspersons. The minimum standards for each sport are set by our Sports Governing Bodies, in agreement with the Home Office. It is right professional sportspersons below this standard should not be able to pursue such a career in the UK using our employment or study visa routes – including Tier 4.

Genuinely amateur players are already completely free to play sport on a purely amateur basis, whilst they are in the UK.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions officials in her Department have had with (a) the Scottish Football Association, (b) Scottish Women's Football and (c) the Scottish Women's Premier League on (i) the definition of sportsperson in the Tier 4 visa regulations and (ii) the effect of those regulations on participation in football in Scotland.

Tier 4 visas have restrictions imposed regarding what work can be undertaken during the period leave. One of the conditions of holding a Tier 4 visa is that students must not engage in Professional sport.

The definitions of amateur and professional sports persons contained in the immigration rules were established following full consultation with all our Sports Governing Bodies, including the Scottish Football Association, the representative body for football in Scotland. The Home Office routinely engages with our Sports Governing Bodies and other governmental departments regarding the immigration requirements for professional sport.

The immigration system makes specific provision for professional sportspersons to come to the UK. These provisions seek to strike a balance between enabling UK sports teams to access top class international talent and protecting development opportunities for home grown sportspersons. The minimum standards for each sport are set by our Sports Governing Bodies, in agreement with the Home Office. It is right professional sportspersons below this standard should not be able to pursue such a career in the UK using our employment or study visa routes – including Tier 4.

Genuinely amateur players are already completely free to play sport on a purely amateur basis, whilst they are in the UK.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of amendments to Tier 4 visa regulations in respect of the definition of sportsperson on the number of (a) players and (b) clubs within the (i) Scottish Football Association, (ii) Football Association of Wales, (iii) Football Association of England and (iv) Irish Football Association.

Tier 4 visas have restrictions imposed regarding what work can be undertaken during the period leave. One of the conditions of holding a Tier 4 visa is that students must not engage in Professional sport.

The definitions of amateur and professional sports persons contained in the immigration rules were established following full consultation with all our Sports Governing Bodies, including the Scottish Football Association, the representative body for football in Scotland. The Home Office routinely engages with our Sports Governing Bodies and other governmental departments regarding the immigration requirements for professional sport.

The immigration system makes specific provision for professional sportspersons to come to the UK. These provisions seek to strike a balance between enabling UK sports teams to access top class international talent and protecting development opportunities for home grown sportspersons. The minimum standards for each sport are set by our Sports Governing Bodies, in agreement with the Home Office. It is right professional sportspersons below this standard should not be able to pursue such a career in the UK using our employment or study visa routes – including Tier 4.

Genuinely amateur players are already completely free to play sport on a purely amateur basis, whilst they are in the UK.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions her Department has had with (a) the Scottish Government, (b) the Welsh Government, (c) the Northern Ireland Executive on the effect of Tier 4 visa regulations on participation rates in sport.

Tier 4 visas have restrictions imposed regarding what work can be undertaken during the period leave. One of the conditions of holding a Tier 4 visa is that students must not engage in Professional sport.

The definitions of amateur and professional sports persons contained in the immigration rules were established following full consultation with all our Sports Governing Bodies, including the Scottish Football Association, the representative body for football in Scotland. The Home Office routinely engages with our Sports Governing Bodies and other governmental departments regarding the immigration requirements for professional sport.

The immigration system makes specific provision for professional sportspersons to come to the UK. These provisions seek to strike a balance between enabling UK sports teams to access top class international talent and protecting development opportunities for home grown sportspersons. The minimum standards for each sport are set by our Sports Governing Bodies, in agreement with the Home Office. It is right professional sportspersons below this standard should not be able to pursue such a career in the UK using our employment or study visa routes – including Tier 4.

Genuinely amateur players are already completely free to play sport on a purely amateur basis, whilst they are in the UK.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many service personnel hold a Large Goods Vehicle licence permitting the transport of hazardous materials on public roads and highways.

The Department maintians sufficient trained drivers to meet its routine operational outputs.

The precise information sought goes beyond current operational requirements and will require further time to respond. I will write to him shortly.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Apr 2020
What plans he has to provide (a) support and (b) accommodation for overseas nationals experiencing homelessness with no recourse to public funds during the covid-19 outbreak.

We have provided over £3.2 billion of new funding to help local authorities to reduce risks to public health and to support individuals on the basis of need. This includes those sleeping rough.

The Government recognises that these are unprecedented times and expects local authorities to support people who are sleeping rough, and also to minimise unnecessary risks to public health, acting within the law.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
2nd Feb 2021
What assessment he has made of the effect of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on his Department’s responsibilities.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) fully delivers on what the British public voted for in the referendum and in last year’s General Election. It takes back control of our laws, borders, money and fisheries, and ends any role for the European Court. Our deal is based on friendly cooperation between sovereign equals, centred on free trade and inspired by our shared history and values.

We have successfully negotiated unprecedented provisions for legal services that go beyond what the EU has included in any other FTA. The agreement will improve the clarity and certainty of market access for UK lawyers after the transition period.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)