Mohammad Yasin Portrait

Mohammad Yasin

Labour - Bedford

First elected: 8th June 2017



Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Mohammad Yasin has voted in 742 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Mohammad Yasin voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Labour No votes vs 124 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 385 Noes - 100
View All Mohammad Yasin Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(23 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Independent)
(14 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(10 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(34 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(27 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(24 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(23 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Health and Social Care Levy Act 2021
(522 words contributed)
Nationality and Borders Act 2022
(397 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Mohammad Yasin's debates

Bedford Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Mohammad Yasin has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Mohammad Yasin

17th April 2024
Mohammad Yasin signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 17th April 2024

The cost of private rent in England and rent controls

Tabled by: Caroline Lucas (Green Party - Brighton, Pavilion)
That this House notes the huge cost of private rents in England and increase in private rents since private tenancies were deregulated and section 21 no-fault evictions were introduced under the Housing Act 1988; recognises the challenges with accurately estimating average private rents but further notes historical data points to …
9 signatures
(Most recent: 19 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 6
Independent: 2
Green Party: 1
26th March 2024
Mohammad Yasin signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 15th April 2024

Let Girls Play campaign

Tabled by: Tracey Crouch (Conservative - Chatham and Aylesford)
That this House congratulates the Football Association (FA) and Barclays for hosting its third Biggest Ever Football Session on International Women’s Day, as part of its Let Girls Play Campaign; notes a record breaking 475,000 girls from 5,000 schools across England took part; further notes that this year, the Biggest …
9 signatures
(Most recent: 17 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 3
Labour: 3
Conservative: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
View All Mohammad Yasin's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Mohammad Yasin, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Mohammad Yasin has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Mohammad Yasin

Thursday 30th November 2023

Mohammad Yasin has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
19th Oct 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what discussions she has had with the Home Secretary on the effectiveness of the Windrush Compensation Scheme for affected groups.

Since April 2019, the Windrush Compensation Scheme has paid over £67 million in compensation.

The Scheme has reduced the time to allocate a claim for a substantive casework consideration, following completion of eligibility checks and a Preliminary Assessment, from 18 months to under 5 months.

The Home Office continues to listen to feedback from stakeholders and the communities and make improvements the scheme and the way it operates to ensure people receive the maximum compensation at the earliest point possible.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps she is taking to help encourage the manufacture of new zero-emission aircraft.

As part of the Jet Zero Strategy, government co-invests in zero-carbon aircraft technology through the Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI) Programme. To date, it has supported collaborative R&D projects totalling over £500m which will help develop new and enabling technologies for zero emission aircraft.

Government provided a £15m grant to the ATI-led FlyZero project, which found that green liquid hydrogen offers the greatest potential to power future zero-carbon emission aircraft. Building on FlyZero, government is funding the ATI-led ‘Hydrogen Capability Network Phase 0 Project’ to accelerate the development of liquid hydrogen propulsion aircraft technologies, capabilities and skills in the UK.

Government also set up the Jet Zero Council, a partnership with industry to drive the ambitious delivery of new technologies and innovative ways to cut aviation emissions. It includes a focused Zero Emission Flight Delivery Group to advise on how government and industry can put the UK in a leading position in the race to achieve zero emission flight.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
23rd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what plans she has to support (a) the Ants Group and (b) other renewable energy companies to help achieve the Government’s net zero targets by 2030.

The Government recognises the important roles that renewables developers, contractors and suppliers play in contributing to the achievement of its net zero targets.

The Government has provided significant additional funding for renewable energy projects this autumn. Provisions include support via the next Contracts for Difference Allocation Round, funding for renewables manufacturing, and investment tax measures.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment her Department has made of the impact of some utility companies prohibiting payment of bills at high street banks and post offices on affected customers; and whether her Department is taking steps to help support people who do not have access to online and telephone banking to set up direct debits with their utility suppliers.

The Supply Licence requires suppliers to offer a wide choice of payment methods and must include payment by cash and in advance through Pre-payment Metres. Some suppliers have stopped providing a Giro Payment slip on bills to encourage customers to switch to online or telephone banking, but these suppliers must provide a giro payment if requested in-line with their Supplier Licence Conditions.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of introducing service standards with timescales for the repayment of accumulated credit on live energy accounts.

Ofgem rules state that consumers can ask for their credit on an open energy account to be refunded at any time. Suppliers are required to comply with refund requests in a timely manner unless it is fair and reasonable for them to refuse.

In February 2023, Ofgem completed a Market Compliance Review on Direct Debits. Through this intervention they secured supplier improvements in relation to credit balance arrangements, including improved refund timescales ensuring consumer credit balances are returned promptly when requested, and the creation of formal Direct Debit and Credit Balance Refund policies where these did not previously exist.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what steps she is taking to help protect employees from (a) tracking surveillance and (b) covert monitoring.

Monitoring of employees by employers must not breach the duty of trust and confidence implied into an employee's contract of employment and must comply with the European Convention of Human Rights, Data Protection legislation and Equality Act 2010. Employers are neither expressly permitted to monitor employees, nor are they prohibited from doing so.

Organisations that process workers’ personal data for the purposes of monitoring their activities or surveillance must comply with the requirements of the UK General Data Protection Regulation (‘UK GDPR’) and the Data Protection Act 2018 (‘DPA’). This means that the data processing must be fair, lawful and transparent.

The UK GDPR and the DPA are administered and enforced independently of the government by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). The ICO publishes a range of advice and guidance for organisations on their data protection obligations.

The ICO have been consulting on draft guidance on the data protection considerations which are likely to be relevant if an employer is minded to use tracking or surveillance technologies to monitor the activities of employees. The draft guidance discusses the need for employers to make workers aware of the nature, extent and reasons for the monitoring unless exceptional circumstances mean that covert monitoring is necessary. The draft guidance, entitled Employment practices: monitoring at work can be viewed on the ICO’s website.

23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to reduce petrol and diesel prices.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave the hon. Member for Strangford on 17th June 2022 to Question 14492.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of taking steps to ensure that streaming services that allow users to subscribe on devices also allow subscribers to cancel on those same devices.

On 20 April 2022, the Government published its response to the consultation ‘Reforming Competition and Consumer Policy – Driving growth and delivering competitive markets that work for consumers’. The response reaffirmed our commitment to boosting consumer rights and preventing scams and rip-offs, including proposals to make subscriptions easier to exit. The Government will legislate to implement the reforms when Parliamentary time is available.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to reduce the use of fossil fuelled boilers; and if he will introduce targets to phase them out.

In order to meet our net zero commitment, we must transition away from fossil fuel heating systems. We are developing policies to support the deployment of low carbon heating supporting consumers financially to help them transition away from fossil fuel heating through initiatives such as the Renewable Heat Incentive. We are spending £2.8bn between 2018 and 2021 through the Renewable Heat Incentive, to support the deployment of low carbon technologies such as heat pumps.

We also recently launched the Green Homes Grant vouchers scheme meaning homeowners and residential landlords can receive up to £5000 towards the installation of an approved low carbon heating measure. In due course we shall be setting out our proposals for the decarbonisation of heat in the Heat and Building Strategy.

In addition, in the Future Homes Standards consultation, which closed 7 February, we proposed that new homes should have 75-80% fewer CO2?emissions than ones built to current building regulation standards.?This will not be achievable using conventional gas boilers in new build properties. We will respond to this consultation in due course.

4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will provide additional financial support to firms that are developing the next generation of low carbon aircraft.

Technology and innovation are important for growing the UK’s aerospace sector. Through the Aerospace Growth Partnership, the Government and industry are investing a total of £3.9 billion from 2013 to 2026 in aerospace research and development. Funding is directed by the UK’s Aerospace Technology Strategy, which focuses on developing future aircraft while reducing the environmental impacts of aviation and raising the competitiveness of the UK sector.

We are also investing a further £300 million in the Future Flight Challenge, which provides funding to develop future air transport systems that will include electric and autonomous flight.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if his Department will take steps to tackle the deteriorating condition of park tennis courts in England.

Sports and physical activity providers and facilities are at the heart of our communities, and play a crucial role in supporting adults and children to be active. Having access to high quality facilities is central to this.

Through the pandemic, Sport England has provided £220million directly to support community sport clubs and exercise centres, via a range of funds including their £35million Community Emergency Fund. This includes 164 awards to tennis totalling £787,879 through Covid funding since March 2020. Sport England also invested £2,084,948 in the Lawn Tennis Association as part of the rollover of NGB national funding in 2021/22.

In January 2021, Sport England also published their strategy ‘Uniting the Movement’ and as part of this have committed an extra £50million to help grassroots sports clubs and organisations affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

Beyond Covid, Sport England has awarded £14,807,641 to tennis projects since 2017, 101 of which had elements of capital investment (totalling £2,474,618). Sport England also made 578 awards to multi-sport projects (totalling £38,199,899) where tennis is expected to benefit in the same period.

The Government continues to work closely with the Lawn Tennis Association and local partners to support the maintenance and development of these facilities.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the condition of park tennis courts in England.

Sports and physical activity providers and facilities are at the heart of our communities, and play a crucial role in supporting adults and children to be active. Having access to high quality facilities is central to this.

Through the pandemic, Sport England has provided £220million directly to support community sport clubs and exercise centres, via a range of funds including their £35million Community Emergency Fund. This includes 164 awards to tennis totalling £787,879 through Covid funding since March 2020. Sport England also invested £2,084,948 in the Lawn Tennis Association as part of the rollover of NGB national funding in 2021/22.

In January 2021, Sport England also published their strategy ‘Uniting the Movement’ and as part of this have committed an extra £50million to help grassroots sports clubs and organisations affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

Beyond Covid, Sport England has awarded £14,807,641 to tennis projects since 2017, 101 of which had elements of capital investment (totalling £2,474,618). Sport England also made 578 awards to multi-sport projects (totalling £38,199,899) where tennis is expected to benefit in the same period.

The Government continues to work closely with the Lawn Tennis Association and local partners to support the maintenance and development of these facilities.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will extend the six-month deadline for the Coronavirus Community Support Fund where lockdown measures introduced in November 2020 and from January 2021 have delayed recipients from making use of these funds as intended.

The Coronavirus Community Support Fund (CCSF) is a £200million grant scheme which helped organisations to meet service costs where they were experiencing increased demand and/or short-term income disruption. Funding is distributed and administered by The National Lottery Community Support Fund (TNLCF).

Under the terms of the scheme, all funding had to be distributed and spent by recipients in the 2020/21 financial year. TNLCF began awarding grants in early July 2020 and, as of 15 March 2021, 99.9% of the funding had been disbursed to over 8,000 organisations.

Grant agreements are between TNLCF and grantees, and grants were initially intended to cover a six month period. However, successive lockdowns put additional pressure on charities to deliver, and not all projects were able to go ahead as envisaged. Where this was the case, TNLCF encouraged flexibility within terms of the grant agreement to help grantees adapt and continue to deliver their ambitions. This included some extensions to grants where appropriate.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the proportion of the £200 million Coronavirus Community Support Fund which must be repaid by recipients after the six month deadlines expire; and if he will make a statement.

The Coronavirus Community Support Fund (CCSF) is a £200million grant scheme which helped organisations to meet service costs where they were experiencing increased demand and/or short-term income disruption. Funding is distributed and administered by The National Lottery Community Support Fund (TNLCF).

Under the terms of the scheme, all funding had to be distributed and spent by recipients in the 2020/21 financial year. TNLCF began awarding grants in early July 2020 and, as of 15 March 2021, 99.9% of the funding had been disbursed to over 8,000 organisations.

Grant agreements are between TNLCF and grantees, and grants were initially intended to cover a six month period. However, successive lockdowns put additional pressure on charities to deliver, and not all projects were able to go ahead as envisaged. Where this was the case, TNLCF encouraged flexibility within terms of the grant agreement to help grantees adapt and continue to deliver their ambitions. This included some extensions to grants where appropriate.

19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Government's guidance on searching for archaeological finds in England during COVID-19, what evidence basis his Department used to determine that metal detecting could continue in public outdoor spaces but not on privately owned land during the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown.

The Guidance on searching for archaeological finds in England during Covid-19 (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/guidance-on-searching-for-archaeological-finds-in-england-during-covid-19) on the gov.uk website explains how the legal restrictions in force in England from 5 November under the Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions)(England) (No. 4) Regulations 2020 impact the activity of metal detecting. In particular, the guidance outlines the effect of the restriction on leaving home without reasonable excuse (under regulation 5), and the exception to that restriction (in regulation 6(2)(d)) which permits a person to visit a "public outdoor place" for the purposes of open air recreation." The definition of a “public outdoor place” for this purpose does not include privately owned land to which the general public does not have access.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how she plans to measure the effectiveness of the SEND change programme.

In March 2023, the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan committed to testing a suite of SEND and AP policy proposals. The Change Programme is a vehicle for testing these proposals. Since the Change Programme launched in September 2023, the department has been working with the Change Programme authorities, including Bedford which is the lead local authority for the East of England Change Programme Partnership (CPP).

The effectiveness of the Change Programme will be measured through a formal independent evaluation for which the department has appointed an independent evaluator to conduct a process and implementation evaluation of the SEND and AP Change Programme as a whole. The evaluation will help the department understand which elements of the change programme are working well or less well and help shape suitable recommendations for improving ongoing delivery and future policy and practice.

As the Change Programme partnerships test the reforms they will feedback as to what is and is not working.

This feedback loop, led by the department and the change programme delivery partner, REACh, will not only help understand effectiveness but will also allow the department to share any early insights into the effectivity of reforms more widely. Feedback is received through the department’s frequent meetings with REACh.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many primary schools in (a) Bedford constituency and (b) England employ a play or creative arts therapist.

The 2022 Schools White Paper sets out the Government’s plan for all schools to provide safe, calm and supportive school environments, with targeted academic, pastoral and specialist support, helping children and young people to fulfil their potential.

It is for schools to decide what support or therapies they provide, considering the needs of their pupils. The information requested is not held by the Department.

The roles of staff employed by schools is collected as part of the annual School Workforce Census each November. The data can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

Data from the November 2022 census is currently being collected and will be published in the summer of 2023.

8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment she has made of the potential merits of extending the Period product scheme for schools and colleges in England to also include higher education institutions.

The Period Products Scheme launched in January 2020 and has recently been extended until July 2024. Within the first two years of the scheme, 94% of secondary schools and 90% of post-16 organisations had ordered products at least once. Higher Education providers are autonomous bodies, and it is up to them how they meet their students’ needs. This can include providing discretionary financial support where required, which can be used to cover the purchase of period products.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what comparative assessment his Department has made of the reading and spelling levels of children taught through (a) the phonics approach and (b) alternative methods.

There is significant evidence that systematic phonics works better than other methods for teaching early reading. In 2005, the Department commissioned a review into the teaching of early learning and the report from the review, led by Sir Jim Rose, was published in 2006. The Rose Review recommended that systematic phonics should be the prime approach for teaching children to read.

The review can be found here: https://dera.ioe.ac.uk/5551/2/report.pdf.

A review on phonics was carried out by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) and the Sutton Trust who are, together, the Government-designated What Works Centre for Education. They found that phonics is more effective on average than other approaches for early reading, when embedded in a rich literacy environment. Systematic phonics consistently supports younger readers to master the basics and the EEF considers it the most secure area of pedagogy.

The review can be found here: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/phonics.

The Department is committed to raising literacy standards, ensuring all children can read fluently and with understanding. Since 2010, the Government has accelerated the effective teaching of phonics, by placing it right at the heart of the curriculum. This has included introducing the annual phonics screening check (PSC) in 2012 for pupils at the end of year 1 and changing the national curriculum published in 2013 which requires schools to teach reading using systematic phonics. In 2019, 82% of 6-year-olds met the expected phonics standard, compared to 58% in 2012. Success in phonics is also predictive of later reading comprehension.

In 2016, England recorded its highest ever score in the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, with a significant improvement compared to 2006 and 2011. This improvement is largely attributable to increases in the average performance of lower performing pupils and boys. These results followed a greater focus on reading in the primary curriculum, and a particular focus on phonics.

In 2018, the Department also launched a £26.3 million English Hubs Programme dedicated to improving the teaching of reading, with a focus on supporting children making the slowest progress in reading, many of whom come from disadvantaged backgrounds. The 34 English Hubs in the programme are primary schools which excel at teaching early reading. The Department has since invested a further £17 million in this school-to-school improvement programme, which focusses on systematic synthetic phonics, early language, and reading for pleasure.

The teaching of reading now also receives greater focus in Ofsted’s inspection framework.

In 2021/22 the academic year, the Department introduced the Reception Baseline Assessment (RBA) to act as a baseline for primary progress measures at the end of key stage 2. The assessment will help determine a pupil’s experience prior to primary school, which will be influenced by various factors. At present there are no plans to publish interim progress measures as there is currently no data to assess the pupil’s progress in phonics between the RBA and PSC (the first cohort to have taken the RBA will complete their PSC in June 2023).

13th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the announcement of 2 January 2022 entitled More support to keep pupils in the classroom, how many of the 7,000 air purifiers his Department has delivered to schools; and how much of the £25 million funding committed for CO2 monitors has been (a) delivered and (b) spent as of 13 July 2022.

As of 24 June 2022, there were 8,026 department-funded air cleaning units and 386,699 department-funded CO2 monitors delivered to state-funded education providers.

A total of £23,933,979.60 (including VAT) has been spent on CO2 monitors in this contract.

5th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure accommodation for homeless and looked after 16 and 17 year olds is regulated and safe.

We have consulted on a set of ambitious proposals to reform unregulated provision for children in care and care leavers, including how to enforce new national standards for providers to drive up quality, keeping young people safer and delivering better outcomes. We will be responding to this consultation and setting out our plans for ensuring the high-quality of unregulated semi-independent and independent accommodation in due course. Our proposals are available here:
https://consult.education.gov.uk/unregulated-provision/unregulated-provision-children-in-care/.

The government is clear that any 16- or 17-year-old who is homeless, or threatened with homelessness, must be assessed by children’s services, as set in the statutory guidance. This guidance is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/provision-of-accommodation-for-16-and-17-year-olds-who-may-be-homeless-and-or-require-accommodation.

Every child, who children’s services have a duty to accommodate, will have to be placed in a setting that meets the new national standards. There are only 2 circumstances in which a local authority might find that a homeless young person should be accommodated by homelessness services under the Housing Act rather than by children’s services under section 20 of the Children’s Act. These are where the young person is either:

  1. Not a child in need.
  2. A 16- or 17-year-old child in need who, having been properly and fully advised of the implications and having the capacity to reach a decision, has decided that they do not want to be accommodated under section 20.

In those circumstances, where a young person is accommodated by homelessness services under the Housing Act rather than by children’s services, the department will continue to work together with the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, local communities, the government and with sector experts, to ensure this group of young people get the right support and accommodation they need.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what support and activities will be available to vulnerable children during the summer holidays in 2020.

The summer period is a time of increased risk and vulnerability for many children and young people, which is why across government we have looked to strengthen our existing provisions to meet vulnerable young people’s needs over the summer period.

The Holiday Activities and Food programme, backed by £9 million of investment, will provide free healthy meals and enriching activities to thousands of disadvantaged children throughout the summer of 2020, building on the success of the 2018 and 2019 programmes.

As well as the Holiday Activities and Food programme, we are providing food vouchers for disadvantaged children through the COVID Summer Food Fund. Due to the unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 outbreak, we recognise families will face increased pressure on household budgets over the coming months. This fund will enable children who are eligible for benefits-related free school meals to be supported over the summer holiday period. During the COVID-19 outbreak, we have also temporarily extended the free school meals eligibility to include some groups who have no recourse to public funds.

Alongside this support, we also have a comprehensive set of services that will continue to support young people over the summer months. The National Citizen Service (NCS) will provide a new support offer for 16 to 17 year olds. Further education colleges and schools will be offered a menu of NCS activities over 2-10 days, which can be tailored to support any summer or autumn activities that the college or other provider are running as part of their post COVID-19 re-engagement or induction phases with students. This support will be free to further education colleges and schools and delivered in late summer and throughout autumn.

We have also distributed funding to strengthen key frontline services, including £34.15 million to support vulnerable children’s charities. This funding has been used to provide online counselling, therapy and face to face support for vulnerable children through a coalition of charities led by Barnardo’s, as well as funding to expand helplines and provide ongoing support to particularly vulnerable groups.

A range of other support for vulnerable children will continue over the summer holidays including maintaining contact with families through the Ministry of Communities, Housing and Local Government’s Troubled Families programme, as well as the Home Office’s Violence Reduction Units that will continue to bring together multi-agency partners to tackle violent crime and provide summer provision.

The government is also providing £1 billion of catch-up funding to directly tackle the impact of lost teaching time over the 2020-21 academic year. This includes £650 million to be shared across state primary and secondary schools, which can be used to support pupils through summer school provision.

13th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to protect children that have underlying health conditions that attend special educational needs provision from covid-19.

Supporting education settings to mitigate the impact of Covid-19 is the department’s highest priority.

We are working closely with colleagues across the government to ensure that all appropriate arrangements and support are in place for all of the department’s sectors, from early years and childcare to schools and children’s social care and also for vulnerable groups including children with long-term medical conditions.

Schools should continue to support their pupils’ health needs as normal and should follow Public Health England advice at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-information-for-the-public.

17th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps he has taken to tackle teacher shortages.

There are over 453,000 teachers in our schools – 12,000 more than in 2010 – and postgraduate recruitment to teacher training is at its highest level since 2010-11. The Government recognises that we need to do more to attract and retain teachers, particularly as the economy improves, pupil numbers grow and the demand for talented graduates increases.

Last year, the Department launched the first ever integrated strategy to recruit and retain more teachers. This included the biggest teaching reform in a generation: the Early Career Framework (ECF). The ECF will provide new teachers with the solid foundations for a successful career in teaching, backed by £130 million a year in funding when fully rolled out in 2021.

The strategy also set out priorities to make it easier for great people to join the profession, develop clearer career pathways for classroom teachers, and help school leaders establish more supportive school cultures to reduce teacher workload.

The Department has committed to raising starting salaries for new teachers to £30,000 by 2022-23, putting teaching on a par with other top graduate professions. We are also offering generous bursaries of up to £26,000 during training in key secondary subjects such as mathematics, physics and modern foreign languages. Additionally, physics, mathematics, languages and chemistry trainees starting initial teacher training in 2020-21 will receive three early-career payments totalling £6,000 spread across years two, three and four of teaching. This total may increase to £9,000 if the trainees are teaching in local authority areas the Department has identified as having high need for teachers, as determined by our published data.

17th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to reduce the pupils per teacher ratio in secondary schools.

As the context of individual schools is different, there are varying approaches to effective staff deployment. It is for school leaders to determine how best to deploy their teachers and the Government trusts them to make the right staffing decisions for their schools. The Department is committed to supporting schools to achieve excellent outcomes for pupils with a wide range of different staffing models.

The Department is also working to ensure school leaders can access the advice, tools and data they need to make the best use of school resources and plan their workforce deployment effectively and efficiently. We have published practical guidance and tools on school resource management, including the School Workforce Planning Guidance[1], which encourages school leaders to plan their workforce together with the curriculum and finances over three to five years.

The Department is taking steps to keep teachers in the classroom so that the teaching workforce is as strong as possible. In January 2019, we launched the Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategy, which set out four priorities to attract and retain teachers in the profession. We will transform support for early career teachers through the Early Career Framework (ECF), which will underpin a two-year package of structured training and support for early career teachers, backed by £130 million a year in funding when fully rolled out in 2021.

The other key priorities set out in the strategy are around making it easier to train to become a teacher, supporting schools to establish more supportive school cultures, and developing coherent career pathways for those teachers who wish to stay and excel in the classroom.

In addition, the Department plans to raise starting salaries for new teachers to £30,000 by 2022-23, aligning teaching with other top graduate professions. We have introduced financial incentives including bursaries of up to £26,000 for mathematics, physics and modern foreign languages trainees, as well as early career payments for new chemistry, languages, mathematics and physics trainees in 2020-21, in order to encourage good trainees to join and remain in the profession.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-workforce-planning

31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to respond to Question 8086 tabled by the hon. Member for Bedford on 5 January 2024 on hornets.

A response was published on 12 February 2024. I apologise for the delay in responding to the hon. Member.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department is taking steps to help eradicate Asian hornets from the UK before spring 2024.

In 2023 the National Bee Unit (NBU) – part of the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) - located and destroyed 72 Asian hornet nests. The NBU has been taking action against Asian hornet since 2016 and has a fine-tuned response. They frequently find a nest within a day of an initial sighting being reported. Previously the highest number of nests the NBU had dealt with in one year was 4. Nevertheless, the NBU drew on further resources from wider APHA to provide an effective response to this unprecedented number of Asian hornet nests.

Asian hornet is inactive over winter, normally between November and March. During this period any new queens released from nests in the autumn hibernate. Only a proportion of these will survive and go onto create new nests in spring. Therefore, no further contingency action will be taken until the spring when the hornets start becoming active.

We are developing further plans for 2024 which will be announced prior to the spring. The NBU will continue to respond to credible sightings of Asian hornet and eradicate any nests that are located.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she has made an assessment of the potential merits of working with (a) OFWAT and (b) water companies on (i) desalination and (ii) other sustainable water supply solutions.

Defra recently published its Plan for Water setting out the importance of ensuring a clean and plentiful water supply. The National Framework for water resources sets out in detail how the Government, regulators and regional groups, including water companies, will work together to improve water resources management. This includes reducing demand, halving leakage, developing new water supplies and moving water to where it is needed.

Earlier this year, regional water resources groups and water companies consulted on their draft water resources plans. These statutory plans set out how each company will secure water supplies sustainably for at least the next 25 years. Within their plans, water companies consider all options, including demand management and water resources infrastructure, such as desalination. The draft water resources management plans contain proposals for multiple new schemes by 2050, including 9 new desalination schemes, 9 new reservoirs, 11 new water recycling schemes, and several new internal and inter-company transfers to share resources.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she plans to take steps to introduce a national textile recycling scheme.

The Government’s 2018 Resources & Waste Strategy for England identified textiles as a priority sector for action. Our ambitions to minimise textile waste will be outlined in the upcoming document Maximising Resources, Minimising Waste, which constitutes a new Waste Prevention Programme for England. We expect to publish this in summer 2023.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will include glass in the deposit return scheme; and if he will make a statement.

The full response to our consultation on a Deposit Return Scheme (DRS) will be published in due course.

However, as part of our response to the consultation on Extended Producer Responsibility, we announced any DRS in England and Northern Ireland would not include glass.

Concerns were raised that including glass in a DRS risked reducing the amount of glass available to remelt, whilst making reverse vending machines larger and more complicated, as well as causing extra risk to both shop staff and consumers.

Glass will be subject to regulation via Extended Producer Responsibility and continue to be recycled at the kerbside.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions his Department has had with HM Treasury on the proposed consultation into the impact of the July 2023 High Court ruling in Uber Britannia Ltd v Sefton MBC.

The Department for Transport and HM Treasury have worked closely on the consultation, which was launched on 18 April, on the impacts that recent High Court rulings on private hire vehicle legislation may have on the sector and its passengers.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of allowing (a) local authorities and (b) police forces to retain revenues from speeding fines.

No recent assessment has been made.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has made an assessment of the potential impact of the changes to the HS2 project on East West Rail.

East West Rail (EWR) Connection Stage 1 (providing services between Oxford-Bletchley and Milton Keynes) is in construction and is due to enter into service by 2025. The East West Rail Alliance continues to work closely with HS2 Ltd to ensure the interfaces between the schemes are well understood and any shared risks mitigated.

EWR Connection Stages 2/3 are in development and will be subject to statutory consultation and DCO application.

No change has been made to the programme as a result of the Network North announcement.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has had discussions with East West Rail on the timescale for when the 2024 Statutory Consultation will commence.

As set out in the Route Update Report published by East West Rail Company in May 2023, a statutory consultation on the project is expected to take place in the first half of 2024. Consideration will be given to the questions for consultation by East West Rail Company in advance of this.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will include a question in the upcoming East West Rail 2024 Statutory Consultation on the level of support for the project; and if he will (a) record and (b) publish any comments left in the box for any other comments.

As set out in the Route Update Report published by East West Rail Company in May 2023, a statutory consultation on the project is expected to take place in the first half of 2024. Consideration will be given to the questions for consultation by East West Rail Company in advance of this.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of approving a 10 percent of house value compensation payment as part of the East West Rail Need to Sell Property Scheme for homes confirmed as being blighted.

The East West Rail Need to Sell Property Scheme was launched in May 2023 to address generalised blight that may arise from the East West Rail project. Applicants to the scheme are asked to provide evidence against five criteria set out in the Scheme Guide and East West Rail Company is committed to resolving cases as quickly as possible. Where an application is successful, East West Rail Company will make an offer to purchase a property for the unblighted market value. Compensation under the scheme is the same as is offered under the HS2 Need to Sell Scheme.

The first application to progress to the East West Rail Need to Sell Panel was accepted in September 2023. Once a Development Consent Order application has been submitted, individuals or businesses with a qualifying interest in property within the relevant area and meeting other statutory requirements, would be able to serve a blight notice on East West Rail Company as the scheme promoter, requesting purchase of their property. The Department for Transport and East West Rail Company will keep property acquisition schemes for the project under review.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to take steps to require that vibration and noise monitoring plans are shared with (a) affected residents and (b) elected representatives for feedback prior to their implementation by East West Rail.

East West Rail Company is currently gathering information to understand current noise and vibration levels across the preferred route and to identify potential impacts from planned works. Mitigations and ongoing monitoring measures will be outlined in a Noise and Vibration Management Plan. Local residents and elected representatives will be able to comment on this as part of a forthcoming statutory consultation and during the examination process once a Development Consent Order application has been submitted.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
13th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Bedford to Cambridge section of East West Rail is still designated a nationally significant infrastructure project.

There has been no change to the designation of the East West Rail Project. In 2019 the then Secretary of State directed that the East West Rail Project between Bedford and Cambridge, as well as any associated matters, is nationally significant, and as such should be treated as development for which development consent is required, under section 35 of the Planning Act 2008. Due to this, East West Rail Co. will be required to make an application for a Development Consent Order (DCO) to obtain permission to construct and operate the railway.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing ownership records, alongside registered keeper details on V5C documents in the context of present lack of ownership documentation allowing people to change ownership or keepership of a vehicle without requesting checks.

The vehicle register held by the DVLA, is not a register of legal title or ownership of vehicles.

Based on the latest available data, the DVLA is confident that just over 92% of the keepers on record are contactable and traceable based on the information held.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
12th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing ownership records, alongside registered keeper details, on V5C documents.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) maintains a register of vehicles and their keepers in the United Kingdom. The purpose of the vehicle register is to assist in revenue collection, road safety, law enforcement and to record who is responsible for the vehicle’s day-to-day use. The vehicle register held by the DVLA, is not a register of legal title or ownership of vehicles.

The registered keeper of a vehicle can be an individual or a corporate organisation, and they are legally responsible for notifying the DVLA that they have disposed of the vehicle and for notifying them who the new keeper is. Based on the latest available data, the DVLA is confident that just over 92% of the keepers on record are contactable and traceable based on the information held.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of levels of staffing required at railway stations on step-free access at those stations.

Staff will continue to provide face-to-face service on our railways for passengers who need additional support. We are committed to transforming accessibility across the UK rail network and moving staff out of underused ticket offices and into the station will mean they can provide help where it is most needed. Furthermore, we are currently undertaking a full accessibility audit across 2,564 stations across Great Britain to help shape future investment in accessible rail travel.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
14th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to his comments in an interview with Iain Dale on LBC radio on 11 July 2022, whether he plans to cancel tranches 2 and 3 of East West Rail; and if he will make a statement.

Connection Stage 2 (Bletchley to Bedford) and Connection Stage 3 (Bedford to Cambridge) of East West Rail are at development stage. Next steps for the project will be set out in due course.

7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to tackle the driver shortages disrupting the Marston Vale Line run by London North Eastern Railway.

In common with other train operators, the Omicron COVID-19 variant has significantly affected staff availability on London Northwestern Railway (LNR). As a result, LNR has temporarily focused its reduced resources on providing a resilient train service on those routes with the most passengers and where bus replacement would be impractical.

The inconvenience to passengers on the Marston Vale line is regrettable, and we will be working with LNR to ensure that the train service is restored as soon as it can be reliably provided.

11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to publish a report on the Network Rail (London to Corby) (Land Acquisition, Level Crossings and Bridge Works) Order application.

The report from the Planning Inspectorate on the Network Rail (London to Corby) (Land Acquisition, Level Crossings and Bridge Works) Transport and Works Act Order application, will be published alongside the decision letter from the Secretary of State when this is made. The Secretary of State will aim to issue his decision as soon as he can.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the process of applying to the DVLA for a provisional licence will resume following the covid-19 outbreak.

Applications for provisional driving licences can be made online at https://www.gov.uk/apply-first-provisional-driving-licence

Customers can also make postal applications for a provisional driving licence. However, paper applications are likely to take significantly longer to process in the current circumstances.

27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to report on the Network Rail (London to Corby) (Land Acquisition, Level Crossings and Bridge Works) Order application.

The decision by the Secretary of State on the Transport and Works Act Order application by Network Rail for the London To Corby (land acquisition and bridge works) Order will be made in the near future.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of allowing future childcare costs to be met in advance through Universal Credit rather than being recovered retrospectively.

The Government recognises that high childcare costs can affect parents’ decisions to take up paid work or increase their working hours which is why on June 28, 2023, the Department started providing even more help with initial upfront childcare costs when parents move into work or increase their hours.

This means that a parent who needs this additional financial help can now be provided with funding towards both their first and second set of costs (or increased costs), upfront, thereby easing them into the UC childcare costs cycle.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the (a) mean, (b) median, (c) longest and (d) shortest wait time was for processing mandatory reconsiderations of benefits decisions in the latest period for which data is available.

The lower quartile, median, mean and upper quartile waiting times for processing mandatory reconsiderations for PIP, UC and ESA benefit decisions are below. To provide information across all other DWP administered benefits would incur disproportionate cost.

Note that information about the extremes of a distribution (e.g. the maximum clearance time) risks being disclosive. We would not release this information publicly. Therefore, we have presented information on the lower quartile, median, mean and upper quartile of clearance times. Please note, the mean can be unduly affected by outlying cases. As such, the median is our preferred central measure for MR clearance times.

Table 1: PIP MR clearance times (calendar days), Normal Rules, from August 2021 to July 2022

Year

Lower Quartile

Median

Mean

Upper Quartile

August 2021 – July 2022

38

57

55

70

Notes:

  1. Each PIP claim can have more than one reconsideration registered against it. The above includes all MR decisions (excluding withdrawn and cancelled).
  2. The PIP MR clearance times are based on the clearance times from the point of registration to the date the MR was cleared.
  3. DWP offers particular support for those coming to the end of their life, known as Special Rules for End of Life (SREL). This was formerly called Special Rules for Terminal Illness (SRTI). Cases which are not processed under SREL are referred to as ‘normal rules’ claims. The status of claims as 'normal rules' or 'SREL' is shown as at the point of registration.

Table 2: UC MR clearance times (calendar days) from October 2021 to September 2022

Year

Lower Quartile

Median

Mean

Upper Quartile

October 2021 to September 2022

23

51

67

100

Notes:

  1. Each UC claim can have more than one reconsideration registered against it. The above includes all MR decisions (excluding withdrawn and cancelled).
  2. The UC MR clearance times are based on the clearance times from the point of registration to the date the MR was cleared.
  3. This data on UC MR clearance times is unpublished data. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.

Table 3: ESA WCA MR clearance times (calendar days) from August 2021 to July 2022

Year

Lower Quartile

Median

Mean

Upper Quartile

August 2021 to July 2022

5

10

13

14

Notes:

1. ESA MR clearance times are based on the date when the Benefit Centre has decided that the MR received is a valid MR, having considered whether they can initially change the decision in the light of any new information to the date when the decision maker at the Dispute Resolution Team (DRT) has cleared and logged the final decision.

Notes

  • Figures are for Great Britain only.
  • Definition of Mandatory Reconsideration: Claimants who wish to dispute a decision made on their PIP claim are required to ask the Department to reconsider the decision, before they can lodge an appeal with Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service. MRs can arise for various reasons, such as omitting to tell DWP about relevant evidence during the initial decision-making process; this could include not returning forms required as part of the claim.
  • Definition of Lower Quartile: The lower quartile is the value for which 25% of all clearance times fall below if you were to order the distribution from lowest value to highest value.
  • Definition of median: The median time is the middle value if you were to order all the times within the distribution from lowest value to highest value.
  • Definition of mean: The mean time is the value if you were to sum all the clearance times together and divide that by the number of cases. Please note, the mean can be unduly affected by outlying cases.
  • Definition of Upper Quartile: The upper quartile is the value for which 75% of all clearance times fall below if you were to order the distribution from lowest value to highest value.
Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)