Charlotte Nichols Portrait

Charlotte Nichols

Labour - Warrington North

First elected: 12th December 2019


Energy Bill [HL]
22nd May 2023 - 29th Jun 2023
Workers (Predictable Terms and Conditions) Bill
1st Mar 2023 - 8th Mar 2023
Online Safety (Re-committed Clauses and Schedules) Bill
7th Dec 2022 - 15th Dec 2022
Social Housing (Regulation) Bill [HL]
23rd Nov 2022 - 29th Nov 2022
Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Bill
2nd Mar 2022 - 8th Mar 2022
European Scrutiny Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 2nd Nov 2021
European Statutory Instruments Committee
10th Feb 2020 - 2nd Nov 2021
Higher Education (Freedom of Speech) Bill
7th Sep 2021 - 22nd Sep 2021
Shadow Minister (Equalities Office)
14th May 2021 - 14th Sep 2021


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Charlotte Nichols has voted in 775 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Charlotte Nichols Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Paul Scully (Conservative)
(22 debate interactions)
Penny Mordaunt (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(20 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(17 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department for Education
(40 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(30 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(26 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Online Safety Act 2023
(3,134 words contributed)
Trade Bill 2019-21
(1,783 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Charlotte Nichols's debates

Warrington North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

People with a lifelong illness should not be subject to regular reviews for eligibility for the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) or Employment and Support Allowance (ESA). People suffering lifelong conditions should not have to prove they are still ill every couple of years.

The Government should remove the requirement for people claiming disability benefits, such as the Personal Independence Payment (PIP), to have to go through an assessment process. Claims should be based solely on evidence from medical professionals, such as a letter from a GP or consultant.

We want the Government to conduct a full review of the PIP process. This should look at DWP policy and the performance of ATOS and Capita, which conduct the health assessments for applicants. We believe the current process is inherently unethical and biased, and needs a complete overhaul.

I would like the Government to:
• make running conversion therapy in the UK a criminal offence
• forcing people to attend said conversion therapies a criminal offence
• sending people abroad in order to try to convert them a criminal offence
• protect individuals from conversion therapy

The Government is refusing to release official research on the characteristics of grooming gangs, claiming it is not in the “public interest”.

We, the British public, demand the release of the official research on grooming gangs undertaken by the Government in full.

The Home Secretary said what happened to victims of child sexual exploitation gangs was “one of the biggest stains on our country’s conscience.” Last year local authorities identified 18,700 suspected victims of child sexual exploitation. We want an independent public inquiry into Grooming Gangs.

Being the first to close and still no clue as to when we can open, this seasonal industry is losing its summer profits that allows them to get through the first quarter of next year.

Even if we are allowed to open in December, 1 months profit won't be enough to keep us open in 2021. We need help

The UK hospitality industry. Responsible for around 3m jobs, generating £130bn in activity, resulting in £38bn in taxation. Yet, unlike the Arts or Sports, we do not have a dedicated Minister.

We are asking that a Minister for Hospitality be created for the current, and successive governments.


Latest EDMs signed by Charlotte Nichols

7th February 2024
Charlotte Nichols signed this EDM on Wednesday 13th March 2024

Gellings Riding School

Tabled by: Ian Byrne (Labour - Liverpool, West Derby)
That this House supports Gellings Riding School in its efforts to acquire the land it is situated upon in order to secure its existence for future generations; notes that the school is a vital community asset which has been an integral part of the West Derby community for 30 years, …
24 signatures
(Most recent: 13 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 21
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Independent: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
20th February 2024
Charlotte Nichols signed this EDM on Wednesday 13th March 2024

Detention of Frenchie Mae Cumpio

Tabled by: Liz Saville Roberts (Plaid Cymru - Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
That this House demands the immediate release of Filipino community journalist Frenchie Mae Cumpio, who has been in detention since her arrest along with four human rights defenders since 7 February 2020 in Tacloban City; believes that the evidential basis for her arrest was fabricated, and that she is innocent …
17 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 10
Plaid Cymru: 3
Scottish National Party: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Charlotte Nichols's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Charlotte Nichols, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Charlotte Nichols has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Charlotte Nichols

Thursday 15th December 2022

1 Bill introduced by Charlotte Nichols


A Bill to establish a passenger charter for disabled land transport passengers setting out their rights, the legal obligations of transport operators, complaints procedures, passenger assistance schemes and accessibility requirements; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 7th September 2021
(Read Debate)

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
27 Other Department Questions
19th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if she will reform the Gender Recognition Act 2004 to allow transgender people who are deceased to be legally remembered by the gender they lived by.

We recognise the sensitivity of these situations, particularly when family and friends are dealing with the loss of a loved one. The Gender Recognition Act (GRA) 2004 provides for people to change their legal gender. Those who have undergone this process and acquired a Gender Recognition Certificate (GRC) before the time of their death will, of course, be recognised in their new gender.

Without undergoing the process of legal gender recognition and acquiring a GRC under the provisions laid out in the GRA 2004, a person has not legally changed gender. Therefore they would not be recognised in their new gender upon the unfortunate event of their death. That said, where a person was using their new gender with an organisation prior to their death, and that was on their personal records, then we anticipate that the organisation would engage with their family members using the new gender. These organisations could include the NHS, their place of work or community groups.

We recognise that everyone who decides to undergo a change in how their legal sex is recorded deserves our respect, support and compassion throughout the process. The process does not currently allow for third party applications, such as posthumous applications on behalf of a deceased friend or relative, as any application will be a deeply personal undertaking and choice.

Following the GRA consultation and the subsequent changes we made to the application process, we have no plans to further amend the Act.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what her timeline is for bringing forward the proposed draft Bill on conversion therapy.

No one in this country should be harmed or harassed for who they are and attempts at so-called ‘conversion therapy’ are abhorrent. That is why we are carefully considering this very complex issue. We will be setting out further details on this in due course

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Jul 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent steps she has taken to help close the ethnicity employment gap.

The ethnic minority employment rate is at a record high of 69.4 per cent. This is an increase of 1.1 percentage points on the previous year, and 3 percentage points above the pre-COVID rate (Jan-Mar 2019). There are now 4.9 million ethnic minority workers in employment in the United Kingdom. This is an increase of 391,000 on the previous year and is also a record high.

We want everyone to be able to find a job, progress in work and thrive in the labour market, whoever they are and wherever they live. For example, we are working with over 85 of the country's most influential employers through the Apprenticeship Diversity Champions Network to widen participation in apprenticeships particularly for people from disadvantaged backgrounds and under-represented groups, including ethnic minorities.

We published Inclusive Britain in March 2022, our groundbreaking strategy to tackle negative ethnic disparities, promote unity and build a fairer Britain for all. Our update report to Parliament on 17 April set out the excellent progress we have made so far in delivering this strategy. This includes launching an Inclusion at Work Panel to tackle bias and ensure fairness, and publishing new guidance for employers on how to use positive action in the workplace and to report on ethnicity pay gaps.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if she will set out the Government's timeline for its pay transparency pilot.

We are currently considering the scope of the pilot and want to ensure that it provides informed insights for employers looking to implement greater pay transparency. Decisions about the form that the pilot takes will have an impact on the timeline for the work.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
12th Jul 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps the Government taking to help close the (a) gender, (b) ethnicity and (c) disability pay gap.

Over the last decade the gender pay gap has fallen by approximately a quarter and mandatory gender pay gap reporting has helped motivate employers to improve workplace gender equality. To accelerate progress we have supported legislation to: enhance flexible working, extend redundancy protection for those on maternity leave, and introduce carer’s leave.

On ethnicity pay gaps; in April this year we published guidance for employers on how to voluntarily calculate and publish their ethnicity pay gaps. This will allow businesses to report accurately and in a consistent manner, and to address any unfair ethnicity pay gaps within their workforce.

With regard to the disability pay gap, we recognise that one of the greatest challenges is opening up opportunity in the workplace. In March 2023, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) published Transforming Support: The Health and Disability White Paper. This sets out how DWP will: support more disabled people to start, stay and succeed in work.



Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
16th Jun 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Lancaster and Fleetwood, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what checks are undertaken to ascertain whether candidates for election to (a) the House of Commons and (b) local authorities are on the sex offenders register.

A person is disqualified from being elected to a local authority in England and Wales if they are on the sex offenders register at the time of their nomination and on polling day.

The Scottish Government is consulting on introducing a similar disqualification for Scottish local government elections. There is not currently a similar disqualification in place in Northern Ireland, or for UK parliamentary candidates.

It is the candidate's responsibility, not the Returning Officer's, to ensure that the information they submit on their nomination papers is correct. If a candidate decides to stand despite not meeting the eligibility criteria, this would be a matter for the police.

20th Apr 2023
What recent assessment she has made of the impact of increases in the cost of living on disabled people.

This Government understands the impact of the rising cost of living on disabled people, which is why over 6 million people will receive the £150 disability cost of living payments, and 60% of these households will be entitled to additional means-tested cost of living payments worth up to £900.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions she has had with ticket sales and distribution companies on the level of their fees to customers.

My Department’s officials engage with the Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers (the self regulatory body for the entertainment ticketing industry in the United Kingdom) on a regular basis, as well as other organisations involved in the ticketing industry and consumer protection policy. In general, there are no limits on what service providers can charge for their services, but there are rules to prevent consumers from being misled as to the price of services. The Department for Business and Trade leads on policy relating to the primary ticketing market and my department continues to work closely with them on the issues in this area.

Consumer legislation requires information, such as price, to be upfront, where possible, and transparent. The transaction process should provide customers with details of the total price before the customer confirms the purchase. Alleged breaches of the legislation should be reported to the Citizens Advice consumer helpline on 03454 04 05 06 or via its website here. They are able to pass complaints onto Trading Standards for further enforcement action where appropriate.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
21st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential impact on trans people of press reports that use a trans person's former name.

The Government strongly supports editorial independence and does not interfere with what the press publishes. However, with freedom comes responsibility and the press is required to abide by the law of the land.

There is an independent self-regulatory regime to ensure that the press adheres to a wider set of clear and appropriate standards, and to offer individuals a means of redress where these are not met.

The majority of traditional publishers—including 95% of national newspapers by circulation—are members of IPSO. A small number of publishers have joined Impress, while others, including the Financial Times and the Guardian, have chosen to stay outside either self-regulator with their own detailed self-regulatory arrangements.

The regulators enforce codes of conduct that provide guidelines on a range of areas. If they find that a newspaper has broken the code of conduct, they can order corrections. IPSO can also order critical adjudications and Impress can levy fines. IPSO has produced guidance on researching and reporting stories involving transgender individuals. The guidance Impress has published on its standards code also includes information on this subject.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of (a) reporting standards and (b) levels of public trust in the press, and whether she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to raise standards and restore public trust.

The Government is committed to independent self-regulation of the press, and does not intervene in or oversee the work of the press regulators.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
27th Feb 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Lancaster and Fleetwood, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, whether the Committee has had discussions with the Electoral Commission on guidance to be issued during the training of polling station staff on dealing with voters who do not have eligible ID.

The Speaker’s Committee has not had discussions with the Electoral Commission on the matter referred to.

The Electoral Commission has published guidance for Returning Officers on delivering the voter ID requirement, alongside a handbook and quick guide for polling station staff. These provide staff with support and guidance to implement the legislation on polling day and manage any issues which arise, including where a voter does not have an accepted form of ID.

Legislation requires polling station staff to collect data on the number of voters not issued with a ballot paper, whether because they have produced ID which is not on the list of accepted documents or have not produced any ID at all. This data will be anonymised and then provided to the Government and the Commission after polling day.

The Commission will report on how the May 2023 elections were delivered, including how voters found taking part, and what lessons can be learned for the future.

27th Feb 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Lancaster and Fleetwood, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what discussions the Committee has had with the Commission on the guidance issued to local authorities on requirements to record the (a) number and (b) identity details of people turned away from polling stations for not possessing required identification.

The Speaker’s Committee has not had discussions with the Electoral Commission on the matter referred to.

The Electoral Commission has published guidance for Returning Officers on delivering the voter ID requirement, alongside a handbook and quick guide for polling station staff. These provide staff with support and guidance to implement the legislation on polling day and manage any issues which arise, including where a voter does not have an accepted form of ID.

Legislation requires polling station staff to collect data on the number of voters not issued with a ballot paper, whether because they have produced ID which is not on the list of accepted documents or have not produced any ID at all. This data will be anonymised and then provided to the Government and the Commission after polling day.

The Commission will report on how the May 2023 elections were delivered, including how voters found taking part, and what lessons can be learned for the future.

23rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when she expects the proposed independent regulator for football to be established.

We recognise the need for urgent action to safeguard the future of football clubs throughout the English football pyramid, so will legislate to put the regulator on a statutory footing as soon as Parliamentary time allows.

As the White Paper makes clear, the Government is actively exploring establishing a shadow regulator ahead of legislation, to ensure that both the statutory regulator and regulated clubs can hit the ground running.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if she will make it her policy to make it mandatory for all restaurants to provide braille menus.

Under the Equality Act 2010, businesses and service providers, including restaurants, already have an anticipatory duty to make reasonable adjustments for disabled people.

The anticipatory duty requires them to consider the disadvantage(s) that may be experienced by a group of disabled people - for example, those who are blind - rather than an individual disabled person and ensure that relevant adjustments are put in place before they might actually be needed, so that people with such disabilities would not be put at a substantial disadvantage compared to non-disabled service users when using facilities or services.

Such adjustments should address the communication needs of deaf and blind customers and could include the provision of auxiliary aids, such as menus made available in Braille. We believe that a reasonableness test is appropriate, as individual circumstances will differ.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what discussions she has had with her counterparts and legislators in (a) Malta, (b) France, (c) Canada, (d) New Zealand, (e) Greece and the relevant regional or state governments of the (i) US, (ii) Spain and (iii) Australia on their legislation on banning conversion practices and their protection of transgender people.

The Government has engaged with a wide range of international counterparts including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, France, and Malta, to understand the approaches they have taken to ban conversion therapy. We will continue to engage with counterparts around the world that are committed to protecting everyone from conversion practices to share insight and develop our approach.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what discussions she has had with the Welsh Government on banning sexual orientation and transgender conversion practices.

The Government has been liaising with territorial offices and the devolved administrations including the Scottish Government, Welsh Government and the Northern Ireland Executive on this important issue.

Officials will continue to work with their counterparts across the devolved administrations to discuss the UK Government’s approach to protecting everyone in England and Wales from conversion therapy practices.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the recommendations made by the Ending Conversion Practices Expert Advisory Group in Scotland on 4 October 2022.

The Government has been liaising with territorial offices and the devolved administrations including the Scottish Government, Welsh Government and the Northern Ireland Executive on this important issue.

Officials will continue to work with their counterparts across the devolved administrations to discuss the UK Government’s approach to protecting everyone in England and Wales from conversion therapy practices.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what work has been undertaken by her Department on transgender conversion practices since the Government set out its plans on this topic in its background briefing to the Queen’s Speech in May 2022.

Since May 2022, the Government has launched a support service open to all victims or those at risk of conversion practices regardless of their background or circumstances. The Government has committed up to £360,000 over three years to this service. The service includes a helpline, instant messaging service, and website to enable people to get the support they need.

More widely, the Government remains committed to protecting everyone from these practices. We are carefully considering the responses to the public consultation which closed earlier this year and will respond in due course.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, which accredited medical, counselling or psychological organisations support the Government’s plan to not include transgender people in a ban on conversion practices.

The Equality Hub Ministers and officials have met with healthcare professionals in developing the policy approach to protecting all individuals from conversion practices. Many such organisations responded to the public consultation that closed in February 2022.

We will continue to meet with healthcare professionals to inform our approach and will respond to the consultation in due course.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether her Department has consulted (a) NHS England, (b) NHS Wales, (c) the Royal College of GPs, (d) the Royal College of Psychiatrists, (e) the British Psychological Society and (f) the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy as part of its work to explore the issue of transgender conversion practices further.

The Equality Hub Ministers and officials have met with healthcare professionals in developing the policy approach to protecting all individuals from conversion practices. Many such organisations responded to the public consultation that closed in February 2022.

We will continue to meet with healthcare professionals to inform our approach and will respond to the consultation in due course.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if she will make it his policy to require large employers to collect socioeconomic background data for use in (a) outreach work with schools and (b) recruitment and progression policies.

This government believes the circumstances of one's birth should not determine life outcomes. The Social Mobility Commission (SMC), an independent body sponsored by the Equality Hub in the Cabinet Office, works to achieve this aim.

The Commission’s employer engagement team works with employers of varying size, across multiple sectors, to create more inclusive and diverse socio-economic workforces. Through their research and engagement with industry trade bodies and employers, and external diversity and inclusion research, they have produced guidance for employers that offers practical help and ideas. This includes guidance on how employers can collect the socio-economic background data of their workforce alongside other diversity data, which can be used by them to measure the socio-economic background of their employees and potential recruits in order to understand if their hiring or progression practices are as fair and meritocratic as they can be.

The SMC's advice is for employers to collect anonymous data from their workforce, apprentices and applicants using the key question "What was the occupation of your main household earner when you were about aged 14?" Optional supplementary questions include the type of school attended for ages 11-16 and eligibility for Free School Meals. Further information is available in their employers' toolkit.

The current approach encourages the collection of data on a voluntary basis, as a mandatory approach would represent a significant burden on employers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
1st Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if she will make it his policy to require all large employers to collect socio-economic background data on (a) work experience schemes, (b) apprenticeships and (c) entry-level applicants for use in (i) outreach work with schools and (ii) recruitment and progression policies.

This government believes the circumstances of one's birth should not determine life outcomes. The Social Mobility Commission (SMC), an independent body sponsored by the Equality Hub in the Cabinet Office, works to achieve this aim.

The Commission’s employer engagement team works with employers of varying size, across multiple sectors, to create more inclusive and diverse socio-economic workforces. Through their research and engagement with industry trade bodies and employers, and external diversity and inclusion research, they have produced guidance for employers that offers practical help and ideas. This includes guidance on how employers can collect the socio-economic background data of their workforce alongside other diversity data, which can be used by them to measure the socio-economic background of their employees and potential recruits in order to understand if their hiring or progression practices are as fair and meritocratic as they can be.

The SMC's advice is for employers to collect anonymous data from their workforce, apprentices and applicants using the key question "What was the occupation of your main household earner when you were about aged 14?" Optional supplementary questions include the type of school attended for ages 11-16 and eligibility for Free School Meals. Further information is available in their employers' toolkit.

The current approach encourages the collection of data on a voluntary basis, as a mandatory approach would represent a significant burden on employers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps she is taking to ensure that trans people in England and Wales have the same right to a de-medicalised and shortened process of gender recognition as for trans people in Scotland.

This Government is committed to supporting LGBT people, tackling discrimination and improving the lives of all citizens.

In September 2020, we announced our response to the Gender Recognition Act (GRA) consultation. We concluded that the current provisions within the GRA allow for those that wish to legally change their gender to do so and that the balance struck in this legislation is correct. There are no plans to make changes to the 2004 Act.

In our response, we also committed to making the process of applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate (GRC) as straightforward and dignified as possible. We have already delivered on our promise to reduce the fee of applying for a GRC to £5, making the process more affordable. We are also progressing work to move the process online, to reduce the administrative burden and streamline the overall experience for applicants.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, for what reasons support services for victims of conversion therapy have not yet been commissioned; and what steps she plans to take to ensure that survivors of that therapy get the support they need to contribute to the Government’s consultation on banning conversion therapy.

The Government is working at pace to deliver on our commitment to ban conversion therapy. As previously stated, we will also ensure there is support available for victims of conversion therapy; the first time the UK Government has offered this. The support will be available to whoever considers themselves to be at risk of - or has undergone - conversion therapy, whatever the circumstances.

The importance of developing a quality service is of central importance, and we are working at pace to explore delivery options available to realise this commitment. An announcement with more details on the service and how it will be delivered will be made in due course.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, when she plans to ban LGBT conversion therapies.

The Government has made clear its commitment to banning conversion therapy and will set out proposals shortly. To ensure we get our proposals right, we have undertaken research to understand the prevalence of practices and experiences of those impacted. Furthermore, officials have been speaking with a range of organisations who hold diverse views, to fully inform our next steps.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what plans she has to address prejudice and attitudes to inequality towards black and ethnic minorities in response to the findings of King's College's study, Unequal Britain: attitudes to inequality in light of Covid.

I will look carefully at the findings of the King’s College study, ‘Unequal Britain: attitudes to inequality in light of Covid’, as part of the government’s commitments to levelling up and to tackling prejudice, racism and discrimination.

This work will also take account of the findings of the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities, which has been carrying out a deeper examination of the causes of disparities and which reported to the Prime Minister on 31 March.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
1st Jul 2021
What steps he is taking to increase the number of prosecutions relating to domestic violence.

This Government has introduced the landmark Domestic Abuse Act 2021.

Coordinated multi-agency action and supporting victims are key components of the CPS’s ambitious programme of work published in January, which will help narrow the disparity between reporting and criminal justice outcomes.

The CPS recently hosted a virtual domestic abuse conference with the police and the courts, sharing best practice and innovation.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Attorney General, whether any (a) employed and (b) indirectly employed Crown Prosecution Service support staff have been furloughed.

The CPS has not furloughed any support staff that it a) employs or b) indirectly employs.

21st Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will extend the offer of a free portrait of King Charles to churches.

The Government does not currently have any plans to extend the offer of a free portrait of The King to churches or other places of worship.

The UK Government launched an Official Portrait scheme in November 2023 to enable certain Public Authorities across the UK to apply for a free, framed official portrait of His Majesty The King for display in their buildings.

The scheme is ongoing and is due for completion by mid year 2024. His Majesty’s accession has marked the beginning of a new reign and the UK Government considers it is right that public authorities, as part of the fabric of our nation, have the opportunity to commemorate this moment, strengthen civil pride and reflect the new era in our history.

A portrait will be available for purchase in due course for those not eligible for this scheme and details will be communicated at the time.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
20th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to tackle pension irregularities in the Defence Fire Rescue Project.

The Cabinet Office, acting as the Civil Service Pension Scheme Manager, has met on a number of occasions with representatives of Unite the Union (Unite), Capita Land Services and MyCSP to discuss issues surrounding Pensionable Pay for members of the Defence Fire and Rescue Services that were transferred to Capita Fire and Rescue. The work is expected to be completed no later than July 2024.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the Prime Minister plans to call the next general election.

Under the Dissolution and Calling of Parliament Act 2022, the precise timing of the next general election is a matter for the Prime Minister. A general election must take place by January 2025.

As the hon. Member will be aware, the Prime Minister has indicated recently that his working assumption is that a general election will take place in the second half of this year. Although, of course, this remains a matter for the Prime Minister's discretion.

In the meantime, the Government is working to deliver a brighter future for Britain, with long-term economic security and opportunity: where hard work is always rewarded; where ambition and aspiration are celebrated; where young people get the skills they need to succeed in life; where families are supported, where those who have worked hard all their lives have the dignity they deserve in retirement; and, with security at home and abroad.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if his Department will take steps to ensure that civil servants who have retired since 1 April 2022 are able to receive the £1500 cost of living award.

I refer the Honourable Member for Warrington North to the answer given on 25th October 2023 in response to PQ 203635.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
12th Jul 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department is taking steps to prevent public contracts being awarded to companies that blacklist workers.

The Employment Relations Act 1999 (Blacklists) Regulations 2010 prohibit the compilation, usage, sale or supply of blacklists. The Public Contracts Regulations 2015 contain exclusion grounds which allow contracting authorities to exclude suppliers from procurements where their tender does not comply with labour law or where the supplier is guilty of grave professional misconduct. A breach of the Blacklists Regulations on a particular tender would render the supplier liable to exclusion and a breach more widely may amount to grave professional misconduct.

In all cases, individual departments and other public sector bodies are responsible for their own decisions on these matters

The Procurement Bill introduced by the Government, currently in the final stages of debate in Parliament, builds on and clarifies the exclusions measures in the existing regime. This includes specific measures enabling the exclusion of suppliers for labour market misconduct and professional misconduct.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent steps the Government has taken to engage with the UK Covid-19 Inquiry.

The Government is fully committed to constructive engagement with the Covid-19 Inquiry and has been since its establishment.

Government officials and lawyers meet with the Inquiry on a regular basis, both as part of a regular series of meetings and on an ad hoc basis to discuss specific issues. We have disclosed over 55,000 documents to the Inquiry to date.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
30th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure veterans can access well-paid employment.

Veterans employment in this country is strong, with 87% securing employment in 6 months after service, helping to deliver on the Government’s priority to grow the economy.

DWP’s 50 Armed Forces Champions across the JobCentre Plus network, a 12-month National Insurance Relief for employers recruiting veterans into their first civilian role, and recruitment pathways for veterans into Civil Service careers, such as Going Forward into Employment and a Great Place to Work, are all making a difference to veterans across the country.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of legal fees for judicial review of the notice from the UK Covid-19 Inquiry to his Department under section 21 of the Inquiries Act 2005.

The government’s work on the Inquiry requires legal support which departments will procure at their own discretion from approved internal and external sources. The Judicial Review is ongoing, and as such the Cabinet Office does not yet have an estimate of the cost of the judicial review in this case.

25th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make it his policy to require ministers to resign if they are found to have made an minor breach of the ministerial code.

The Ministerial Code is clear that graduated sanctions are in place for breaches of the Code; this is set out in paragraph 1.7. This has formally been part of the Code since May 2022 when the Code was amended, but this approach has just reflected actual practice from previous Administrations under successive Prime Ministers.

That formal amendment to the Code followed recommendations from the Committee on Standards in Public Life in 2021. The Chair of the Committee noted: “The current expectation that any breach of the Ministerial Code should lead to resignation is disproportionate. We recommend that there should be a proportionate range of sanctions” (Lord Evans correspondence to the Prime Minister, 15 April 2021).

The (then) Prime Minister agreed with this recommendation in his reply of 28 April 2021, explaining: “I agree with your recommendation... this has always been the case, but over time, an expectation has arisen that any breach should lead automatically to resignation, which I agree is disproportionate.”

The (then) Independent Adviser on Ministerial Interests, Lord Geidt, also concurred in his Annual Report of May 2021, noting: "I believe its [the Code’s] status is likely to be enhanced by a more proportionate approach to sanctions”.

The Committee repeated this recommendation in their ‘Standards Matter 2’ final report published in September 2021.

I would also observe that both Houses of Parliament takes a similar approach to breaches of the Code of Conduct by Parliamentarians, as do employers in their HR processes across the public and private sector.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
19th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much his Department has allocated for (a) marketing and (b) related activities for the Unicorn Kingdom campaign in the 2022-23 financial year.

The Cabinet Office publishes expenditure, including on the GREAT campaign, on a rolling monthly basis on gov.uk as part of routine government transparency arrangements. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cabinet-office-spend-data.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
19th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much his Department has spent on (a) marketing and (b) related activities for the Unicorn Kingdom campaign.

The Cabinet Office publishes expenditure, including on the GREAT campaign, on a rolling monthly basis on gov.uk as part of routine government transparency arrangements. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cabinet-office-spend-data.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
9th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the processes were for appointing Government contracts to Infosys Limited.

Public sector contracting authorities are required to purchase products and services through competitive tender in accordance with public procurement legislation, and are responsible for their own commercial decisions, including the award of contracts.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
9th Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if the Prime Minister will amend the ministerial code to require all new Ministers to publish their tax returns.

The Ministerial Code was last updated on 22 December 2022. There are no plans for any further updates.

In submitting their ministerial interest form Ministers are asked to declare their relevant interests in a number of categories. One such area on which information is required is Ministers’ tax affairs. The Prime Minister has recently re-affirmed the importance of ensuring this duty is undertaken conscientiously.

As stated in the answer of 2 February 2023, Official Report, PQ 135428, the Prime Minister has stated his intention to publish his own tax return, which will be published in due course.

However, as has been the case under successive administrations, it is not the intention of the Government to require all Ministers to publish their tax returns. In public life, a balance must be struck between reasonable expectations of privacy and accountability. This reflects that Parliament has previously legislated to maintain the principle of taxpayer confidentiality.

7th Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the Prime Minister was first made aware of the allegations of bullying made against the Rt hon. Member for Esher and Walton.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given by the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 1 February 2023, Official Report, Columns 335-336.

30th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the Prime Minister first became aware that the Rt hon. Member for Stratford-on-Avon had not (a) declared to his permanent secretary and (b) disclosed in his ministerial declaration of interests the investigation by HMRC.

I refer the Hon Member to the Prime Minister's comments to the House on 25 January (https://hansard.parliament.uk/commons/2023-01-25/debates/CC1C6066-E0E7-4BF6-84D4-BB5C11BC1EBA/Engagements#contribution-2261E821-4652-4AE6-A3D4-43A2323BE174 )

As the Hon Member will be aware, the Independent Adviser on Ministers’ Interests provided his findings to the Prime Minister in a letter sent on 29 January 2023. The findings detail the relevant facts in relation to the disclosures made by the Rt Hon Member for Stratford-on-Avon. The advice was published in full on GOV.UK on the day it was received by the Prime Minister, and a copy has been placed in the Library of the House. Correspondence relating to the tax affairs of individual taxpayers is subject to statutory requirements on taxpayer confidentiality.

10th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reasons he took a private jet on a journey to Leeds on 9 January 2023 instead of other forms of transport.

All Ministerial travel is undertaken using efficient and cost-effective travel arrangements.

As a whole, domestic flights within the United Kingdom allow Ministers to visit more parts of the United Kingdom in the time available, particularly areas further away from London, and reduce the need for overnight accommodation for Ministers and accompanying staff. Security considerations are also taken into account.

Details of departmental business travel are published in the Cabinet Office audited annual report and accounts.

8th Dec 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to update the List of Ministerial Responsibilities.

The List of Ministerial Responsibilities has been published and placed in the Libraries of both Houses. It can also be found on GOV.UK at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/government-ministers-and-responsibilities.

2nd Dec 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Government will publish its complete response to the Sir Robert Francis KC Infected Blood Compensation Study before Christmas this year,.

I recognise the importance of the issue and the desire of the honourable lady to receive an update on Government work in relation to Sir Robert Francis’ recommendation.

It is my intention to provide an update to the House as soon as possible.

24th Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what his planned timetable is for the launch of the emergency alert system.

The government remains committed to launching the emergency alerts capability this winter and is in the final stages of validating it is ready for this to happen. The initial focus will be on extreme weather scenarios and, subject to a review of the trial period, we will look to expand its use in the spring of 2023.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when an Ethics Advisor to the Prime Minister will be appointed.

I refer the Rt. Hon Member to my earlier response (PQ79302).

The Prime Minister has confirmed that he intends to appoint an Independent Adviser and that further details will be announced in due course.

The process to appoint an Independent Adviser is already taking place. It is an important role which needs to be considered carefully; this is happening at pace.